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Thread: November 2015 finds

  1. #31
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    My guess is that Alan Parsons was a 'response' to Pink Floyd. Didn't he twiddle knobs on DSoM? Probably someone thought that would be a sufficient selling point.

  2. #32
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    A few on line bits from the same seller (long time wants crossed off) Nothing super rare but nice to have

    Austin Gravelding - Restless Winds on GWP. Same label as the Sarofeen and Smoke Lp.... lovely Don Cooper Style SSW stuff

    On Wings Of Song - On Wings Of Song . Debut Lp from the Femme vox (natch) commune rock for a lovely price.

    Reilly & Maloney - At Last Cheapo Original that has been comped on the Numero Women of the canyon comp.



    Reba Rambo - Resurrection Christian music mainstay's second album ... what a cover. For fans of Bonnie Koloc



    And top of the pile.

    Marcus Allen And Summer Raven - Seeds - Hymns For A New Age

    New age float-folk with femme vox, flute , vibes and synths..... Heavenly





    Thats my lot.... happy me good now
    Rock on Penderyn

  3. #33
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    Just add herd mentality.

    APP's dearth of decent tunes (he says, having heard almost nothing by them) doesn't bother me half as much as the lapels on that jacket up the page. Are those stars!! Jeepers!
    Last edited by Funktionnaire; 07-11-2015 at 05:59 AM. Reason: Tinkering

  4. #34
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    He's still twiddling, current 'Prog God' Steven Wilson was asked who he wanted to engineer his 'Raven...' album and he said 'Get me Parsons now...' well probably not those exact words but you know what I mean, step down too for AP I guess engineering opposed to producing and his 'Project' but the sound is lush on it, true analog spirit to the whole thing:



    I find the Parsons gags on here amusing (spit out my coffee funny on the other thread) but he does know his onions, guy has mad skillz none of this whack it through a new-fangled virtual compressor and be done with it. He be climbing under tables plugging in cables and everything!

    We'd love him if his name was 'Alain Parsonne' and he'd released an obscure french soundtrack.

    Quote Originally Posted by Funktionnaire View Post
    My guess is that Alan Parsons was a 'response' to Pink Floyd. Didn't he twiddle knobs on DSoM? Probably someone thought that would be a sufficient selling point.
    Last edited by amidar; 06-11-2015 at 03:59 PM. Reason: Steven not Stephen of course...

  5. #35
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    Oh dear, I'm now regretting my Alan Parsons gag, largely because it says as much about my ignorance as anything else, since most of their albums were actually released on Arista and not EMI as I thought (and no, I haven't actually heard a great deal of them either, I confess.)

    In my defence, it was an easy mistake to make since the APP served largely as a source of alternative employment to many of those EMI backroom boys and girls, not just Parsons himself. but Kate Bush's producer Andrew Powell, all the lads from Pilot, the sadly missed Chris(topher) Rainbow and a touch ironically, Clare Torry, Jaki Whitren and Lesley Duncan (who I continue to confuse with the actress Lindsay Duncan...) amongst many others.

    I think it's just that I instinctively avoided them as the word 'Project' in their name seemed to strongly imply something that had a high percentage chance of failure....so I'm sorry - the seventies were rather a long time ago and my memory isn't perhaps what it was....
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

  6. #36
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    Nothing to regret GC, despite my respect personally for Mr Parsons engineering skills 'The Alan Parsons Project' are on the whole pretty pants. I have to confess having had a few AP albums pass through my hands and I never noted what record label they were on as they just aren't memorable. The early ones have some good parts as you would expect and they get gradually worse just 'going through the motions AOR' but never had one that's a keeper.I think the Robot one has 'that track' that's his kind of 'tubular bells' on it, could be wrong as I say they aint memorable.

    Its like poor football players become great football managers and great players make crap managers. There are always exceptions but you know what I mean. I guess what I'm trying to say is that AP is the Graeme Souness of music! Anyway gratuitous excuse for parsons 80's pic alert:




    Quote Originally Posted by giantchicken View Post
    Oh dear, I'm now regretting my Alan Parsons gag, largely because it says as much about my ignorance as anything else, since most of their albums were actually released on Arista and not EMI as I thought (and no, I haven't actually heard a great deal of them either, I confess.)

    In my defence, it was an easy mistake to make since the APP served largely as a source of alternative employment to many of those EMI backroom boys and girls, not just Parsons himself. but Kate Bush's producer Andrew Powell, all the lads from Pilot, the sadly missed Chris(topher) Rainbow and a touch ironically, Clare Torry, Jaki Whitren and Lesley Duncan (who I continue to confuse with the actress Lindsay Duncan...) amongst many others.

    I think it's just that I instinctively avoided them as the word 'Project' in their name seemed to strongly imply something that had a high percentage chance of failure....so I'm sorry - the seventies were rather a long time ago and my memory isn't perhaps what it was....

  7. #37
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    APP’s ‘Tales’ was one of my early vinyl purchases. Some family members like their Floyd, so I was hearing and coming to enjoy DSoM. Part of the selling point for ‘Tales‘ was the single. But a big part was his role in DSoM. I recall not being given a firm idea of exactly what that had entailed. Clearly, we were just meant to know.

    You can imagine my surprise when I found almost nothing on the LP to interest me. For a while I simply assumed that it was in some way too advanced for my tastes.

  8. #38
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    Amidar’s comment reminds me that I keep meaning to go again to Youtube for Francois De Roubaix. I haven’t ruled him out from the little bits I have heard; but I’m certainly not pursuing any for now. Any vinyl/cd acquisition would have to be very wallet-friendly for me to think about it.

  9. #39
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    Is there anything to be said about our willingness to revisit unfashionable music and our (my) unwillingness to revisit fashions from the same periods?

  10. #40
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    One you can do mostly in private or discreetly with like minded friends. The other maybe is a bit more public, and more of an overt statement, plain for all to see and cast judgement upon. Having said that, who gives a f**k what anyone else thinks? Well obviously not me anyway. Trouble is, I spend all my money on one and none on the other.

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    Bill Evans: Waltz for Debby LP.
    Dutch press and not top nick but still.

  12. #42
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    I think that just about sums it up TB, I'm one for talking aloud in my day job of repairing computers, I get constant 'What?' from people but rarely give a shit unless I'm deep in thought. I am revisiting the 80's a lot of late and my mix will hopefully reflect this a bit, sadly no AP from that period made the grade yet but screw it I may just cheat a bit download his discography excluding anything pre-1979 and stick some part of him in there, I think I owe it to him now! Its happening! Bastards added more work now!

    As for DSOM I know Syd is great and as a young stoner I avoided DSOM after a few listens because its too depressing and too close to home but revisiting it years ago now I'm one of these saddoes who always reaches for it to test new HIFI setups. The production on it is astounding in my opinion and its pretty much the perfect concept album in length, running order how it flows etc, Waters and the rest never bettered it. Its beautifully realised and executed. The 'Hard Talk' interview with Roger Waters is a real eye opener.

    And yes I've tended to think aloud on here a bit recently, recording, editing, sampling, downloading and records and music in general are sending me a bit cuckoo at the moment! but like yourself I don't give a shit these days, now how am I going to whittle down over 50 gb of vinyl sampling??!?!??

    Quote Originally Posted by treeboy View Post
    One you can do mostly in private or discreetly with like minded friends. The other maybe is a bit more public, and more of an overt statement, plain for all to see and cast judgement upon. Having said that, who gives a f**k what anyone else thinks? Well obviously not me anyway. Trouble is, I spend all my money on one and none on the other.

  13. #43
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    My assertion on the whole Alan Parsons thing is that a great engineer is not necessarily even a good songwriter. APP albums have always felt like the apotheosis of style over substance. I spin I, Robot occasionally (excellent synth action) but have got rid of the others.

    There's a reason why DSotM tests hi-fi setups though and I'm sure Alan Parsons had a lot to do with that.

    No pictures at the moment (sorry), but a trio from a more expensive charity - the flipside being that people overlook things they're not willing to punt on blind at those prices.

    $11 got me:

    Frank Evans - Stretching Forth
    Private press guitar trio (recently comped on Jazzman). The rhythm section is mixed -way- back, and are just barely credited in the sleevenotes. It's really Frank's show. Not really my sort of thing but the style is intriguingly busy and I'm sure he has a few devotees.



    Harry Nilsson - The Point
    Classic, and glad to pick up cheap since he's not quite so bargain bin over here in Aus. Me and My Arrow is the standout after a couple of listens.

    Stockton Riley - World of Babies...
    A very intriguing 1981 (?) private disco single by a saxophonist I cannot find any information on, and his even more obscure funk backing group. The A side Waterworld is disco tempo where everybody takes their own solo turn by turn - wonderful - while the titular B side is a less interesting ballad that's heavier on the sax.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Funktionnaire View Post
    Is there anything to be said about our willingness to revisit unfashionable music and our (my) unwillingness to revisit fashions from the same periods?
    Waist size? Certainly true in my case.
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  15. #45
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    Found this in among a load of fodder in a local charity shop.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B86I_wDmWW4

    Cover bit bashed but after a whirl in the okki nokki plays with hardly any surface noise. Says on the cover that it's the first ever british film score on lp. Pass...

  16. #46
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    Ditto!

    Edit: I have the Parsons discography, I wont use anything obvious as 'Spacefin' says 'IRobot' has lots of cool analog synth action on it, too easy, I'll edit out some bits from his 80's oeuvre. I'll have to call my mix 'Where's Parsons?' now! NOT!

    Quote Originally Posted by Plainstone View Post
    Waist size? Certainly true in my case.

  17. #47
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    Alan Parsons manifesting himself Palmer Eldritch-style in every VG+ thread.

    Soon to be a film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.

  18. #48
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    I'm thinking more along the lines of a 'Brian Blessed' , 'Robbie Coltrane' or 'Geoffrey Rush' (He'd have to bulk up for the part.) as AP. I'm there on opening night! EDIT: A young 'James Brolin' has him down to a tee!

    Maybe we could change the logo of the forum to just a picture of AP's head. I dunno what it is at the moment but since that other thread every time I hear his name or see one of his albums I get the chuckles.

    Parsons update: Working late and clicked on a quiz chat room for a break and someone posted a YouTube to link to 'Eye in the Sky' I swear I'm being stalked by AP now.


    Quote Originally Posted by Funktionnaire View Post
    Alan Parsons manifesting himself Palmer Eldritch-style in every VG+ thread.

    Soon to be a film starring Arnold Schwarzenegger.
    Last edited by amidar; 08-11-2015 at 02:17 AM.

  19. #49
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    More finds from various charity shops, record shops and the ritawebb.....(nothing on EMI though....)



    Ruthann - 'Carry On (Glittering Dancer)' - my birthday treat from a few weeks back - threw a bit of money at it as they tend not to hang around, but it's a damn fine copy - don't think I'm the first to big this up on here, but in case you don't know. the 'Ruthann' in question is Ruthann Friedman, best known as writer of 'Windy' and for her excellent 1969 psychefolk album. 'Constant Companion'. Only available as a promo. this, from 1970. is quite a giant sidestep from those things though, a twisting, turning latin jazz flavoured confection with sweet multi-layered vocals over an impossibly intricate interwoven arrangement by producer/arranger Kirby Johnson, one of 'executive producer' Van Dyke Parks' sometime collaborators. Clocking in at 2:28 it leaves you always wanting more....play it loud....





    Various - 'Capitol Classics 1942 - 1958' - A passable soundtrack to the US postwar boom, and a trip down Memory Lane for anyone like me who was weaned in a Light Programme/Radio 2 household - the standout is Nellie Lutcher's racey 'Hurry On Down', but since I'm well stocked up on Nellie (as you all should be), the main points of note for me are the tracks featuring Ella Mae Morse, 'Cow Cow Boogie' and 'Blacksmiths Blues' which do for the cowherd and blacksmith respectively what 'Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy' did for the reveille blower...hit it, 1940's DJ!....





    Bloodstone - 'Natural High' - As discussed on the '70's guilty pleasures' thread. I was hoping the flip, 'This Thing Is Heavy' would be a full on funk workout, but it's an odd hybrid of soul and reggae that can't quite decide if it wants to be on or off the beat...

    Karina - 'En Un Mundo Nuevo' - I believe there's the odd Karina track worth owning, but this Eurovision entry isn't it...



    Tony Ac Aloma - 'Dim Ond Ti A Mi' - Yaaaay! - once again it's time for THE WELSH CONNECTION! This collection of the best songs of Tony and Aloma compiles three of their late 60's EPs as part of the 'Daffodil Series' on Qualiton, which seems to have been some sort of Decca subsidiary. Tony and Aloma's songs don't really rock in any way, but they harmonise sweetly enough on their self written efforts which sit somewhere between The Seekers and Tony Hatch & Jackie Trent. They became very popular in the clubs of North Wales and immortalised in song the legendary 'Caffi Gaerwen' on Anglesey, epicentre of the swinging North Welsh psychedelic 'tea drinking' scene. Unfortunately, their lasting popularity would make them something of a target for the unruly future generations of Welsh musical youth...



    ...and finally....



    The Phase One Steel Orchestra - 'Task Force EP' - It's rare enough to find a record that includes both versions of Rossini's 'Wedding Dance' and John Miles' 'Music', and even rarer to find them performed by a Steel Band*. This 1983 record by the long running Coventry based community band Phase One ticks all boxes, as well as providing some more traditional banging carnival fare - It's a shame I can't find a Youtube link for these tunes - they're brilliant!

    *STOP PRESS - there always has to be one smartarse to prove you wrong, eh?





    More to come....
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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    Quote Originally Posted by giantchicken View Post

    swinging North Welsh psychedelic 'tea drinking' scene.

    Ah, mushroom tea...I remember it well.

  21. #51
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    Ruthann well nice. But best if I don't listen to her too much. I've enough on my plate with my recent jazz-tinged forays into the early-mid 60's.

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    Secoded, Ruthann 45 is a beauty. Sounds like a lost Tropicalia number. Thanks for making my wants list a little bit longer GC. No really, thanks, I love that

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    Strange isn’t it? You know, how all these threads within threads converge on a single point?

    The year is 1976….

    We don’t yet know it, but it will prove to be something of a watershed…

    We are bona fide rock stars…

    We are living in America…

    We play stadia and can compete with Kiss and Johnny Winter and Aerosmith and Blue Oyster Cult…

    We do lots of drugs…and lots of hookers…

    We have heard the great god EMI proclaim how everything will be ‘A Night At The Opera’…

    We hear our studio neighbours sing of ‘Hotel California’ as we clean out their wasted cocaine from the mixing board…

    We have heard our manager tell us we must be more ‘Opera’, more ‘California’, more ELO…

    We are working on new songs, they are about the things we know, managers and hookers and drug dealers…

    We are adding new experimental dimensions to our sound…

    We have employed a keyboard player and like the Eagles, encouraged our drummer to sing…

    We are expanding in all directions, covering all options…

    We have heard the future and believe it will be influenced by southern-fried blues boogie…

    We are, more or less, more 'more' and less 'less'...

    We are working on a new look for our output – more like Pink Floyd or The Alan Parsons Project…

    We do not realise that as we work, the great god EMI has already contracted the virus that will change everything…

    We are BLACK SABBATHand we are not feeling ourselves today….



    Black Sabbath - 'Technical Ecstasy'
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

  24. #54
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    It's been a fair weekend record wise. Started out when I had the opportunity to leave the office at noon on Friday, which meant I could take the opportunity to visit a tip shop that I read about, it's in a suburban industrial estate and is only open midday a few days a week. Council run, providing employment for the unemployable.
    I turned up, followed the signs and stepped into the typical warehouse tip shop setup. No one was about though. I took a walk around assuming someone would emerge. In a corner I found a box of 45s, many without sleeves and looking beat up. I browsed through the box and found 15 that were not too badly damaged. When I walked towards what looked like the counter a woman emerged with a surprised look. She wondered what I was doing there, as they're not open this Friday, and didn't I see the sign on the door? She was still kind enough to sell me the records, and wanted £2 for the lot. As I left I took a look at the door. There was no sign besides the regular sign "Open Fri 11-15".



    This is the best of the lot. A few spares going to a friend are not pictured.
    The curiously looking A440 record is by a blind pop group that made a record in 1969. Apparently they were on the Saturday evening show at the time.
    The Don Fardon - I'm Alive in a tattered Swedish pic sleeve is the star for me, along with the Scott Walker - Joanna/Always coming back to me.
    The black label is by Swedish group Annabee-Nox - Where have you been.

    The following are from the record fair that was here in Malmö today. I was mostly disappointed about what was on sale. A large number of cheap bins that mostly had stuff that wouldn't sell at charity shops. And some not so cheap bins still containing stuff that barely would sell at a charity shop. And some very overpriced crates.
    I went for 45s and managed to find a few reasonably priced wants, and some that I didn't know that I wanted.



    Nothing that is really unusual here that I need to point out, just that it shows my penchant for picture sleeves, most of them are Swedish issues. The Shangri-Las is in red vinyl.



    The 2 top right I actually found in a record shop on Saturday.
    Örjan is actor Örjan Ramberg who made this 45 in 1969 with Göran Lagerberg of Tages who wrote and produced. From what I read now, Lagerberg actually does the vocals as well as when Ramberg was about to lay down the vocals, they found out that they had recorded the song in the pitch natural to Lagerberg, a quite different pitch than Ramberg was singing in.
    So Örjan is actually just on the cover picture.
    We 4 was bought without sleeve as the shop had 2 copies, with sleeve was £20, without sleeve £2. This was a good deal for me as I had a spare sleeve at home, albeit with a tear.
    Of the rest, the Scott Walker - Plague has been a want for a long time.



    I'm sure I've read about The Hobbits here on VG+. At 5£ for a very nice copy of their 2nd album I thought it was worth taking the punt. I think it's a mixed bag, some very good songs with some that just sound like any pretty-vocal-soft-rock that was so abundant.
    And they are always marketed as PSYCH.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "This is Modpowerpopsouljunkierock´n´roll so stop post shit like Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Grace Jones , Led Zeppelin and some other boring blues stuff, that kind of music don´t belong in this group, if I´ll ever see shit like that posted in this group again that person will be banned from this group forever!!!!"

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by giantchicken View Post
    Strange isn’t it? You know, how all these threads within threads converge on a single point?

    The year is 1976….

    We don’t yet know it, but it will prove to be something of a watershed…

    We are bona fide rock stars…

    We are living in America…

    We play stadia and can compete with Kiss and Johnny Winter and Aerosmith and Blue Oyster Cult…
    Time to nit pick!

    Sabbath were much bigger than Kiss or Blue Oyster Cult in 1976 and would have headlined over both, and probably over Johnny Winter.

    They'd already used keyboards (and synths and orchestration) on several previous albums, particularly since Sabbath Bloody Sabbath.

    They were in slow decline since the highs of Vol.4, and Technical Ecstasy is arguably their worst 70s record, along with Sabotage. The cover (Hipgnosis, naturally) is supposed to be two robots having sex, a literal 'technical ecstasy'.
    Never Say Die! was far better and altogether showed signs of recovery - but then they fired Ozzy.

    It was Tommy Iommi rather than the manager Don Arden who was pushing for the band to keep pace with current trends and 'sound more like Queen' or try other approaches, because he seemed to have a fear of the band repeating itself and it all falling apart, a paranoia not helped by the copious drugs they were all inhaling. It is true that Don Arden's seemed to have turned his attention away from Sabbath, who were probably a pain in the arse to deal with, and was concentrating on other bands such as ELO who were just starting to take off in the USA.

    BTW in 1976 I was 11-12, and none of this meant anything to me yet.

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milesago View Post
    Time to nit pick!

    Sabbath were much bigger than Kiss or Blue Oyster Cult in 1976 and would have headlined over both, and probably over Johnny Winter.
    it's OK to head out for wonderful, but on your way to wonderful, you're gonna have to pass through all right. When you get to all right,
    take a good look around and get used to it, because that may be as far as you're gonna go.

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    I can't wait for the Kiss LP thread.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milesago View Post
    Time to nit pick!
    Bloody nitpickers... - yes, I realise that much of what you say is true - I was merely using a little dramatic license to do a bit of a slick Hollywood style summation of the situation and perhaps convey some of my impressions about the album at the same time.

    Now relax everyone - I'm a tough and weathered old bird and had a good idea of what I was getting into by buying 'Technical Ecstasy' - it was the only Sabbath album from their original run on sale in Kingbee on Saturday, and the price was about right - I was just kind of curious to hear it, that's all.

    I've also ordered a reissue of their self-titled debut which should be on it's way soon. To continue the Hollywood theme, in my personal version of the Black Sabbath story, we're beginning with the car crash and then going back through the years to see how it all came about....
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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    LOOK OUT! SCARY MAN COMING OUT OF THE BLOODY TREE.....AAAAAAAAAAAARRRGH


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    Quote Originally Posted by treeboy View Post
    LOOK OUT! SCARY MAN COMING OUT OF THE BLOODY TREE.....AAAAAAAAAAAARRRGH


    Scooby Doo & Shaggy: "YOIKS!"

    The Gang: "GENESIS P. ORRIDGE!!!???'

    Velma: "So it was you who invented Black Sabbath to scare the relatives away - so you could inherit the Manor House and the family fortune!"

    GPO: "Yes, and I'd have gotten away with it too - if it weren't for you meddling kids!"
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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