Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bollywood Funk

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bollywood Funk

    Posted before but lost in the archives
    Bollywood records that have a funky side, all subjective of course

    01. SHALIMAR, RD BURMAN (POLYDOR, 1978)
    Welcome to the first port of call in Bollywood funk soundtracks. This has it all: deep jazz, groovy
    Latin, catchy funk, traditional Hindi music...if you have to get one Bollywood funk LP, then get this one. The original gatefold cover comes with a psychedelic, kaleidoscopic fold out insert – truly mind blowing.


    02. Dharmatma Kalyanji Anandji (EMI INDIA, 1975)
    Alongside ‘Shalimar’, this LP is one of the most sought after Bombay soundtracks. The main attraction is the instrumental track ‘Cabaret Dance Music’, which accompanies a psychedelic club scene featuring black painted Indians as savages. The music?Mad Hindi psych-funk with a heavy conga beat, frantic Moog, hysterical screaming, manic laughing and sexy giggling. To top it all, there are six instrumentals on this album. Some are breakbeat pieces with Morricone-like melodies; others are heavily influenced by Middle Eastern music, swamped with fuzz guitar. Lots of fuzz guitar.


    03. CARAVAN, RD BURNMAN (EMI INDIA, 1971)
    The quintessential Burman score and a true testament to his off-kilter genius. The rock ‘n’ roll flavoured Cabaret scene had been a standard in Bollywood movies since the ‘50s, but with the song ‘Piya Tu Ab To Aja’, Burman invented a whole new revolutionary style of music - featuring surf guitars, sleazy jazz sax, moody vibes, Spanish trumpet, eerie organ playing, a big band and a ridiculous number of breaks, bridges and rhythm changes. A total classic.


    04. GUMNAAM, SHANKAR JAIKISHAN (EMI INDIA. 1969)
    Possibly the greatest, hardest rockin’ 1960s Bollywood track ever. Used recently in the film Ghost World, ‘Jan Pechechan Ho’ brings the house down with crazy horns, while Lesley Godhino goes animal on the drums and Dilip Naik cranks up his surf guitar to the max. By Shankar Jaikishan, the unchallenged kings of 1960s Indian R&B.


    05. SOUL OF BOBBY, LAXMIKANT PYARELAL (EMI INDIA, 1973)
    One of the most sought after and difficult to find LPs in on our Top 20. As a rule, Bollywood soundtracks contain very little instrumental music, but because of this film’s popularity, they also released its background music, providing one of the biggest trips ever issued on Indian vinyl. Whirling violins, dramatic thumping brass, drum rolls, groovy psyche snippets in a continuous soundscape. Sample heaven basically...


    06. BURNING TRAIN, RD BURMAN (EMI INDIA, 1979)
    In 1979 B. R Chopra decided to make “the most spectacular, colossal, breathtaking, suspenseful and star-filled film ever made in India”. RD Burman’s score is equally as ambitious, featuring helicopters, explosions, synthesised FX and Burman himself on vocoder(!). This has to be one of the most insane and hip electro-Moog, Kraftwerk-esque bit of title music ever made.


    07. BOMBAY 405 MILES, KALYANJI AMANDJI (POLYDOR, 1980)
    This LP contains the sexiest, sleaziest and fattest Indian funk track ever, ‘Na Na Na Yeh’, Bollywood’s answer to Gainsbourg’s ‘Je t’aime moi non plus’. It begins with devastatingly groovy horns and a light tabla rhythm, over which a sexy Indian lady starts whispering, teasing, laughing, giggling and panting! Then the break kicks back in, and all hell breaks loose.


    08. APRADH, KALYANJI ANANDJI (EMI INDIA, 1972)
    This is the only seven-inch included in this Top 20. It contains the original track that Black Eyed Peas lifted and covered on their ‘Don’t Phunk With My Heart’ hit. It’s also one of the best stripped-down Bollywood funk tracks ever made, featuring a frantic sitar riff that BEP failed to pick up in their version.


    09. NAGIN, HEMANT KUMAR (EMI INDIA, 1954)
    This is the earliest release on our list and is an example of an evergreen Bollywood soundtrack. Famous for it’s snake charmer track ‘Been Music’, this features the first use of a rudimentary synthesiser, the clavioline, in Bollywood film, played by a very young Kalyanji! Mesmerising and beautiful from start to finish.


    10. HARE RAMA HARE KRISHNA, RD BURMAN (EMI INDIA, 1972)
    This is one of most well known Bollywood LPs on our list. Once again, RD Burman provides the soundtrack. The film deals with the hippie invasion in India in the early- 70s, and is full of caricatures of loose westerners smokingtheir heads off who are corrupting the country. The music is classic Bollywood funk, featuring two versions of the disco hit ‘Dum Maro Dum’ (‘Take Another Hale’).


    11. HUM KISISE KUM NAHEN, RD BURMAN (EMI INDIA, 1977)
    Another classic funky RD Burman outing with an amazing colourful gatefold cover. ‘Bachna ae Haseeno’ has the grooviest intro ever and is a whole instrumental in itself, featuring a funky brass section and a spacey Miles Davis-like sax solo. ‘Chand Mera Dil’ is an amazing psychedelic Indiantuned percussive beat track... my first Bollywood LP.


    12. SACHAA JHUTHA, KALYANJI ANANDJI (POLYDOR, 1970)
    Whoopie! This is one of the most infectious and happy 1960s soundtracks to have ever come out of the Indian Subcontinent. Words cannot do justice to how bouncy and groovy this is: rock ‘n’ roll, Bollywood-style.


    13. ANAMIKA, RD BURMAN (EMI INDIA, 1973)
    Yet another RD Burman release during his best period in the early-’70s. This contains one of my favourite Asha Bhosle songs, ‘Aaj Ki Raat’, which starts off with her saying, “Oh please darling,
    come quick, come soon darling!” before the sound of thunderstorm breaks into a funky groove and a sublime, dreamy flute riff. It doesn’t get more beautiful than this.


    14. HABARI, SAPAN JAGMOHAN (EMI INDIA, 1974)
    Yes, Bollywood goes safari! Shot on location in Kenya, the film features “the magnificent world of wildlife”, but strangely noAfricans whatsoever. This is a very difficult one to find as it flopped at the Box Office at the time, meaning there aren’t many copies arround now. The unique music, by Bollywood funk genius Uttam Singh, contains the very sought after killer background track, ‘Giraffe Trapping Music’.


    15. MUQQADAR KA SIKANDAR, KALYANJI ANANDJI (EMI INDIA, 1978)
    If you’re planning a Bombay funk dance night, you need this record. The song ‘Pyar Zindagi Hai’ is so damn hard and sleazy. Composers Kalyanji Anandji ripped Lalo Schifrin’s theme music for Jaws for the hypnotic groove, adding some funky drumming. In the midst of all manner of deranged sound FX, a sexy female voice asks, invitingly: “Hey, you dig this sort of music? You like it! So why don’t you come join in lovers paradise!” Okay then.


    16. PROFESSOR PYARELAL, KALYANJI ANANDJI (POLYDOR, 1981)
    Wow! Legendary super-funky LP by the composers of ‘Bombay the Hard Way’. The title track is one of the five funkiest cuts available in Bollyland, with a lady singing “Proooofesssoor Pyyyarrelaaaaal” in a horny Indian fashion, but the climax comes in the shape of a drum break beat in a loose Harvey Mason-style.

    17. KASAM PAIDA KARNEWALE KI, BAPPI LAHIRI (EMI INDIA, 1981)
    Top score from Bollywood’s King of Disco with no less than five great tracks. The best of which is ‘Come Closer’‚ with its slow, heavily sampled hip-hop-like intro. Also contains super-kitsch version of Michael Jackson’s ‘Beat It’, disco-style.


    18. KARATE, BAPPI LAHIRI (EMI INDIA, 1983)
    Rare and fairly unknown Bappi Lahiri score. No traditional Hindi music here, instead four ultra-long, ultra-hard, ultrastomping disco tracks, making for an orgy of devastating beats, weird Moogs, cheesy girl choirs, bombastic horn sections and funky bass lines, all in the finest Indian Bond-meets-Bruce Lee-meets- Blaxploitation tradition, of course. One of my favourite covers.


    19. QURBANI, KALYANJI ANANDJI (POLYDOR, 1981)
    Welcome to the cheesiest record ever made...not only that, but this is the English version! Classic early-’80s release with one very catchy electro track by the funk masters Kalyanji Anandji.


    20. COMMANDER, KALYANDJI ANDANDJI (POLYDOR, 1981)
    And to finish in style...yes, the ultimate killer funk album! Unknown and very hard to find, with good reason, this is pretty much one long instrumental that contains everything you want from Bollywood funk: fat slow beats, a sexy panting lady, funky Moogs and plenty of bizarre FX. Oh, and the sounds of strange jungle birds and a choir of zombies!

  • #2
    I own one of those.

    Comment

    Working...
    X