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It's Brit Bossa 2!

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  • IAN
    replied
    Cheers Sir S

    Lovely version indeed by Sylvia Telles, wonderful guitar work...never heard that before, but have always loved her voice since hearing her do Dindi on that Folklore e Bossa Nova LP (her only UK release I think?)

    I bypassed the Robin Jones track for quite a while too - I guess it's quite subtle compared to other more immediate stuff on the album.

    Thanks for naming a new mini sub genre - the dodgy bossa! There's definitely quite a few in this mix. I can't think of many covers of Samba Saravah...although I did recently come across this wonderful footage of Pierre Barouh singing it Baden Powell...



    That Ike Quebec cut is sumptious. Bilk must have been listening to that (came out one year before Bilk and Bossa)

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  • SirSlim
    replied
    Originally posted by IAN View Post

    My pleasure Sir S, glad your enjoying.
    I'd said I would be back with more comment

    Loved the Tom Springfield version of "estrada do sol" - that flute especially. This version by Sylvia Telles is also wonderful:



    I've had that Robin Jones Lp for 30+ years now - but that track you included, I must have missed somehow - probably my track of the mix!

    Also loved the "dodgy" bossa version of "samba saravah" - had no idea there were any cover versions of this - any other good ones I wonder?

    Other top picks from me included the David & Marianne Dalmour & Harmony Grass cuts and the very Walter Wanderley like version of "oba oba".

    Oh and special shout to the Acker Bilk cut - you lot are turning me into a trad jazzer, though I think Acker may well have been deeply listening to the mighty Ike Quebec's "soul samba" lp to get that particular tone:



    I think I'll be playing this mix again tomorrow - thanks again IAN.

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  • IAN
    replied
    Originally posted by SirSlim View Post
    Just on my 3rd play of this over the last 3 days of fittingly hot and sunny weather - as Babycart says above - possibly even better than volume 1! Back with more comments when I have more time. Thanks again IAN.
    My pleasure Sir S, glad your enjoying.

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  • SirSlim
    replied
    Just on my 3rd play of this over the last 3 days of fittingly hot and sunny weather - as Babycart says above - possibly even better than volume 1! Back with more comments when I have more time. Thanks again IAN.

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  • Tom B
    replied
    Belated thanks Ian, top lockdown Easter listening

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  • IAN
    replied
    Originally posted by babycart View Post

    I think there's a fourth place, probably closest to the jazzers but, rather than looking towards the US and Getz /Byrd etc, you had smart session musicians involved in OSTs and library music who very quickly realised that Un Homme et une Femme had established bossa as part of a distinctly European vocabulary of incidental music. Shabadaba, or whatever you want to call it, was massive in Europe, and some Brits picked up on it fast
    The Kathe Green track seems to come from that.
    I've come across a couple of Scandinavian folk artists tackling bossa, and the results are always engaging. I'd love to find more of that strand of stuff.
    You're right bc, I forgot about the euro bossa soundtrack/library thing. Kathe Green definitely has that flavour. What is it though? Hard to describe, you just know it when you hear it! That sound didn't seem to have too much impact in the UK, apart from on the libraries, with the James Clark stuff on KPM and the odd OST. (After Un Homme it seemed every soundtrack was contractually obliged to have at least one bossa on it).

    The Scandanavian bossa thing has always intrigued me, I think they probably did the best stuff outside of Brazil. There seemed to be some kind of connection and cross fertilisation - some Brazilian artists recorded there, like Sivuca. They had a lot of Sergio Mendes type outfits like The Gimmicks and so on. And like you say their folk/bossa crossover is interesting. I've been listening to some Cornelis Vreeswijk recently and liking his bossa type stuff.

    I guess the fifth strand is the early 60s novelty pop one, (when everyone from Elvis to Jimmy Saville piled in) - I've given this one a bit of a wide berth which is why none appeared in the chart.

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  • babycart
    replied
    Originally posted by IAN View Post

    Interesting that you mention the folk angle. As I've put this mix together I've come to the conclusion that the UK Bossa stuff seems to come from 3 distinct musical places - you have the jazz guys, who perhaps get closest to getting the swing and groove right.

    Next you have the cabaret/strict tempo crowd, who saw Bossa as just another latin rhythm to get involved with - they kind of get the rhythm, but not the swing. Then you have folk people approaching it as just another strand of world folk music - they seem to get the feel/atmosphere/mood right (like Crowdy Crawn), but without concentrating so much on the rhythm.
    I think there's a fourth place, probably closest to the jazzers but, rather than looking towards the US and Getz /Byrd etc, you had smart session musicians involved in OSTs and library music who very quickly realised that Un Homme et une Femme had established bossa as part of a distinctly European vocabulary of incidental music. Shabadaba, or whatever you want to call it, was massive in Europe, and some Brits picked up on it fast
    The Kathe Green track seems to come from that.
    I've come across a couple of Scandinavian folk artists tackling bossa, and the results are always engaging. I'd love to find more of that strand of stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • IAN
    replied
    Originally posted by babycart View Post
    Creme Caramel is the first convincing Mendes-alike I've heard from Britain.
    They even went for the four guys two girls line up...

    Click image for larger version  Name:	R-5673629-1399635546-4571.jpeg.jpg Views:	1 Size:	102.3 KB ID:	1053724

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  • IAN
    replied
    Originally posted by babycart View Post
    Crowdy Crawn is a real stand out that reminds me vaguely of some steel-string and flute north-eastern Brazil stuff – already one of my favourite versions of Dindi, and a song that hints at a fascinating potential for a blend of British folk and bossa that was never picked up on.
    Thanks a lot for sharing your thoughts Bc.

    The Crowdy Crawn is one of my favourites on the mix. I think they make it their own in not trying too hard to make it a bossa but just re-interpreting it in their own way.

    Interesting that you mention the folk angle. As I've put this mix together I've come to the conclusion that the UK Bossa stuff seems to come from 3 distinct musical places - you have the jazz guys, who perhaps get closest to getting the swing and groove right.

    Next you have the cabaret/strict tempo crowd, who saw Bossa as just another latin rhythm to get involved with - they kind of get the rhythm, but not the swing. Then you have folk people approaching it as just another strand of world folk music - they seem to get the feel/atmosphere/mood right (like Crowdy Crawn), but without concentrating so much on the rhythm.


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  • babycart
    replied
    Originally posted by babycart View Post
    Oh wow. This looks amazing. Thanks, Ian.
    This is amazing. Third play and I already think this is even better than the 2015 mix, which I revisited earlier today as well. I honestly reckon there's material for a really good, distinctive compilation album in among the two mixes.

    Slinky Alan Moorhouse opener; Tom Springfield's Jobim tune is an early highlight, but the Crowdy Crawn is a real stand out that reminds me vaguely of some steel-string and flute north-eastern Brazil stuff – already one of my favourite versions of Dindi, and a song that hints at a fascinating potential for a blend of British folk and bossa that was never picked up on.

    Robin Jones is wonderful, too, thoughtful jazzy bossa. Another reason why I finally need to get hold of this record and still regret passing up a cheap copy years back.

    Samba Saravah really needs to be a bit cheesy to work best, I think, and I especially like the fruity trumpet parping on this one.

    David & Marianne Dalmour is just gorgeous. Top after-hours torch vibes with lovely vocals and pure Don Rendell class. I've never heard of these two before, but I'll be looking closer.

    Kathe Green has that dreamy continental OST vibe and Harmony Grass also has a shabadaba library vibe to it before turning into something really surprising and enjoyable.

    The Chris Parmenter track is lovely, despite not quite managing that ginga swing, like your mum doing the samba. Meanwhile while Les Sans Nom do seem to weirdly nail that pulsating rinky-dink Walter Wanderley organ shuffle

    Peggy O Keefe's vibes guy is brilliant, and Creme Caramel is the first convincing Mendes-alike I've heard from Britain.


    Thanks for this, Ian. It's quite clearly a labour of love, with plenty of research and time involved, and it deserves a lot more views than it'll get here. I remember about 10 years ago when the Loronix blog was going full force and he'd sometimes put up odd stuff from round the word. It was almost always received well, and I bet they'd have absolutely loved this.

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  • eine
    replied
    Nationalise this and pipe it at 3pm over all broadcast channels.

    Thank you.

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  • IAN
    replied
    Originally posted by bennyboy View Post
    This is excellent, great work. Already obsessed with the Harmony Grass track.
    Thanks bennyboy. Their album is well worth tracking down. Glad you enjoyed.

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  • bennyboy
    replied
    This is excellent, great work. Already obsessed with the Harmony Grass track.

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  • babycart
    replied
    Oh wow. This looks amazing. Thanks, Ian.

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  • Saint Jude
    replied
    This looks great. Will listen later. Thanks Ian!

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