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May 2005 Chart

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  • May 2005 Chart

    45 REVIEWS:



    BLACK HEAT
    No Time To Burn/Supercool (Atlantic 73)
    This 45 is from the No Time To Burn LP. The song itself is a real basic, yet enticing Funk track mixed with some nice soulful vocals. Supercool is much better however with a little drum break intro and a catchy, bouncy bass line behind the rhythm.



    JAMES BROWN
    Gittin A Little Hipper (Part 2)/Part Two (Let A Man Come In And Do The Popcorn) (King 69)
    This 45 completes my James Brown 45 collection. Gittin A Little Hipper (Part 2) is an instrumental that starts off on the Funk tip before going into a long jazzy interlude in the middle, and then returning to the opening refrain. Let A Man Come In is one of those James Brown jams where the band just plays and Brown throws some lyrics and encouragements over the top, good stuff.



    RAY CHARLES AND HIS ORCHESTRA
    I Don’t Need No Doctor/Please Say You’re Fooling (ABC-Tangerine)
    I Don’t Need No Doctor is a hard hitting RnB/Soul tune with a driving beat and some nice back-up singing by the Raelets as usual. Please Say You’re Fooling is a power ballad with strings.



    RAY CHARLES
    Let’s Go Get Stoned/The Train (ABC-Paramount 66)
    Let’s Go Get Stoned is a mid-tempo RnB number with loud, almost Pop-inspired back-ups by the Raelets on the chorus. Billy Preston also appeared on organ on the track. The Train is a little harder hitting and more of a dance tune.



    RAY CHARLES AND HIS ORCHESTRA
    Unchain My Heart/But On The Other Hand Baby (ABC-Paramount 61)
    Unchain My Heart is a great upbeat RnB tune from 1961 that was a big hit for Charles. It’s got a swinging beat, some nice horns and back-up singing by the Raelets. But On The Other Hand Baby is a soft and subtle Blues number.



    JOE CHOPPER AND THE SWINGING 7 SOUL BAND
    Soul Pusher/For The Good Times (Lanor)
    Soul Pusher is a great upbeat Funk instrumental with the organ holding down lead duties backed by some sharp horn stabs. For The Good Times is a ballad.



    LEE DORSEY
    I Can Hear You Calling/What You Want (Bell)
    What You Want is a great funky Soul tune penned by Allen Toussaint with a pounding bass line supported by the drums. I Can Hear You Calling is a love song that sounds almost like a Country tune that actually fits well with Dorsey’s delivery.



    FLAME AND THE SONS OF DARKNESS
    Solid Funk/Something (P&P)
    Solid Funk is just that, a blazing Funk instrumental anchored by the rhythm guitar, but that starts off with just the bass. Something is a cover of the Beatles classic with female and male vocals trading off with a low-key rhythm-backing track. I actually like the mellow B-side better than the fast paced instrumental.



    FUNKADELIC
    Back In Our Minds/Can You Get To That (Westbound 71)
    This 45 is from the Maggot Brain LP. Can You Get To That features acoustic guitar and Gospel influenced male and female group vocals in a great mid-tempo number sure to make you nod your head and sing along. Back In Our Minds also has group vocals, but instead of reminding you of the church, it takes you to closing time at a bar with a couple guys in a drunken stupor. Not that that’s bad at all by the way.



    FUNKADELIC
    I Got A Thing, You Got A Thing, Everybody’s Got A Thing/Fish, Chips & Sweat (Westbound 70)
    I Got A Thing has a fast wah wah guitar line although the rhythm is actually slow for the first quarter until the band suddenly takes off into a jam. That’s broken up a soulful vocal breakdown in the middle that closes things out. The song appeared on Funkadelic’s first LP. Fish, Chips & Sweat was a 45 only track and actually sounds like an old Parliaments tune. The roots of the song are definitely in Soul and RnB as heard in the singing, although the muddy mix gives it a much harder accompaniment.



    FUNKADELIC
    I Wanna Know If It’s Good To You?/Instrumental (Westbound 70)
    I Wanna Know epitomizes the early Funkadelic Funk-Rock mix with a dark sounding intro with just drums and bass before the guitar and vocals join in. The instrumental flipside is all reverb, feedback and some scorching guitar play. Half way through the band takes it down a notch and the keys take over. I think this is a different mix than used on the Free Your Mind LP.



    BIG JOHN HAMILTON
    Big Fanny/How Much Can A Man Take (Minaret)
    I just rediscovered this 45 listening to an old mix CD that O-Dub gave me a couple years ago. I was able to pick up a copy on a recent trip to the East Coast for Spring Break. Big Fanny is a mid-tempo Soul number with a walking bass line, laid back delivery, and catchy chorus. How Much Can A Man Take is a power ballad.



    BILLY SHA-RAE
    Do It/I Found The One (Hour Glass)
    Do It has a nice and rough early Funk sound similar to Dyke & The Blazers. I Found The One is a nice power ballad.



    SLY & THE FAMILY STONE
    Family Again/Nothing Less Than Happiness (Epic 76)
    This single comes from the Heard Ya Missed Me, Well I’m Back LP. Family Again is a lesser-known Sly Stone song, and there’s a reason for that. It’s not that noteworthy besides a nice drum break in the middle. Not that it’s bad, it’s just not as good as Sly’s other work. Nothing Less Than Happiness harkens back to an earlier RnB sound with Sly and a woman sharing vocal duties.



    SLY & THE FAMILY STONE
    Remember Who You Are/Sheer Energy (Warner Brothers 79)
    Remember Who You Are is one of my favorite late Sly Stone songs. The airy melody and feel combine perfectly with Sly’s singing. Sheer Energy has a little bluesy feel to it with real nice instrumental parts and Gospel influenced group vocals. This is from the Back On Track LP.



    SLY STONE
    Crossword Puzzle/Greed (Epic 75)
    Another recent obsession of mine has been collecting all of Sly Stone’s 45s. A trip to Val Shivley’s in April finished the task. Crossword Puzzle and Greed come from the High On You LP. I first heard the former as a sample for De La Soul’s Say No Go. It has a catchy bass and drum line with horns coming in and out. Greed has a similar upbeat sound to it.



    WHATNAUTS & THE WHATNAUT BAND
    Dance To The Music/Message From A Black Man (A&I)
    Message From A Black Man is a dark sounding number with a bare rhythm track consisting of a walking bass line and a subtle guitar line backed up by the drums as an intro. Eventually a talk over baritone voice begins the singing led by the falsetto lead and some horns. The flipside is an instrumental version of Sly Stone’s Dance To The Music played nice and fast with two long drum breaks.



    LEE WILLIAMS & THE CYMBALS
    L.C. Funk/What Am I Guilty Of (Rapda)
    What Am I Guilty Of is actually the plug side of this 45. It’s a nice sweet Soul tune. That makes the flipside, L.C. Funk, all the more surprising. Beginning with a nice drum break the tune goes into an early-Funkadelic sounding jam.

    LP REVIEWS:



    1910 FRUITGUM CO.
    Hard Ride (Buddah 69)
    The 1910 Fruitgum Co., who was famous for their Pop-Rock hits, wasn’t even a real band. Rather they were studio musicians put together by Buddah Records producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz. On Hard Ride there are hints of that Pop background, but harder hitting tunes as well like the light Psyche of Beggars Epitaph. On the Rock to Blues tune (a) Eulogy (b) Seulb there’s a drum solo that leads into a very short but sweet open drum break. There’s an even shorter break on The Train. The best songs however are the instrumental Creations Of Simon that has a nice bass line, strong drumming and lots of organ, the catchy Rock of Collections Of Thoughts, and the funky instrumental (a) In The Beginning (b) The Thing with horns. This turned out to be a surprisingly good record.



    AFRICA
    Music From “Lil Brown” (Ode)
    It only took me 13 months to listen to this record. I bought it last Spring Break in NYC, but it’s been sitting on the shelf with a bunch of its “cousins” waiting for me to take the time to put needle to vinyl. Africa was a five-piece outfit from Los Angeles. Most of the album consists of covers of Rock hits mixed with a little Afro-Latin percussion and a little Psych for good measure. The results are impressive on cuts like an instrumental version of Paint It Black, Light My Fire, which mixes acoustic guitar with some folkish vocals. With a little rough sounding Sweet Soul on Here I Stand and Savin All My Love, plus a funky little original called Widow, you’ve pretty much got a winner with Music From “Lil Brown.”



    MASASHI AKIYAMA
    Bruce Lee Big Special (Tam)
    All the Martial Arts movie records I see are out of Japan and Bruce Lee Big Special is no exception. It’s a double album produced and directed by Masashi Akiyama with tracks from all four of Bruce Lee’s major movies, Way Of The Dragon, Big Boss, Fist of Fury and Enter The Dragon. In total there are 24 tracks. What’s cool about this compilation is that interspersed amongst the songs are long pieces of dialog in English from the movies themselves, which makes great fodder for mixes, especially as they have ample fight scenes. For example, from Way Of The Dragon they have a great scene where Bruce names off techniques like Dragon Seeks Path and Dragon Whips His Tail while he makes that famous yelp of his. The side on Fist Of Fury, aka The Chinese Connection, is almost all dialog from the movie with Bruce hunting down the Japanese that killed his master. In terms of music there are actually some good cuts like the funky Big Band number The Big Boss (Main Theme) with plenty of wah wah guitar. The same music is used again and again on Fists of Justice (Main Theme), Battle At The Factory and To Be A Man, which has vocals. There’s also the Enter The Dragon Theme, originally composed by Lalo Schifrin. The best however, is the funky Life Or Death Struggle with some fuzz guitar and piano that was sampled by Dilated Peoples.



    KERRIE BIDDELL
    Kerrie Biddell (Bootleg73)
    Kerri Biddell was an Australian female vocalist. Most of her self-titled album is light Folk-Rock. That makes her cover of a Sly Stone song all the more surprising. Biddell does an admirable job on Sing A Simple Song with her high-pitched screams at the end putting the topping on the cake. She also does a good cover of Aretha’s Spirit In The Dark.



    CHARLES BROWN
    Blues N Brown (Jewel)
    Charles Brown was a Blues player, born in Texas, but moved to Los Angeles in 1943 as part of the Second Great Migration of blacks out of the South West to California. He was known for his laid back singing and piano playing. He eventually passed away in Oakland in 1999, working all the way up to his death. Most of Blues N Brown is laid back Blues, but then Brown is able to get down on the more upbeat numbers such as I Don’t Know. It even gets better when the guitar player gets down and funky on Graveyard Song and Jilted.



    AL COBINE
    Hate To See You Go (Studio P/R 75)
    Al Cobine and his big band were out of Indiana where Cobine went to Indiana University where he started his band originally in 1955. Most of the their album is traditional Big Band Jazz. The one stand out track is a funky rendition of Hikky Burr where the band really gets to use their horns to good effect.



    PATTI DREW
    Wild Is Love (Capitol 70)
    Wild Is Love was Patti Drew’s third release for Capitol. It was recorded in Chicago with Richard Evans producing. Most of the record is highly orchestrated, cabaret/Jazz numbers like the title track. In the midst of all this Drew comes with the hard hitting Soul number Hundreds And Thousands Of Guys with a little Gospel inspired get down with hand claps at the end. There’s also the Funky-bluesy Beggar For The Blues with a drum and flute breakdown towards the end.



    RUBY JONES
    Ruby Jones (Curtom 71)
    Ruby Jones might be the only Rock record released on Curtis Mayfield’s Curtom label. The five-piece group had a Hard Rock sound with plenty of power chords, blasting horns, organ and Jones’ belting vocals. Those can best be heard on tracks like 99,000 Times that features a drum break, and a cover of Tightrope that let’s the bass player get down while the horns blast away.



    LOST GENERATION
    Sly, Slick And The Wicked (Brunswick 70)
    I found this record by mistake a couple years ago searching for a James Brown produced act called Sly, Slick and Wicked. Lost Generation were from Chicago and had their only LP produced by Eugene Record from the Chi-Lites, and directed by Willie Henderson, a musician in his own right. This album contained their biggest hit to date, the title track, a sweet, sweet piece of vocal group Soul. The song became such a big hit, it generated enough money for Brunswick to buy its independence from Decca. Also in the Sweet Soul category are Sorry I Can’t Help You and Someday. Stealing the show however, are the covers of Love On A Two Way Street, Give Me Just A Little More Time. And Didn’t I Blow Your Mind. All are better than the originals, other than the great title track. Unfortunately, soon after this release the group disbanded with the members joining various other Chicago acts, with lead singer Lowrell Simon having a big 1970s hit with Mellow, Mellow Right On.



    NEW LONDON RHYTHM & BLUES BAND
    Soul Cookin (Vocalion)
    As their name would suggest, The New London Rhythm & Blues Band were from England. Soul Cookin is based entirely upon covers of American Soul hits recorded pretty much close to the originals. There are some cuts with vocals like Harlem Shuffle and instrumentals like the Rock tinged Soul Mate and grooving Soul Stream. See See Rider also has a funky drum and bass beginning, but the rest of the song is just okay, and there’s also a short drum beak at the beginning of Uptight (Everything’s Alright).

    OLD RECORDS OUT THE CRATES:



    MARVIN GAYE
    Here, My Dear (Tamla 78)
    Hear My Dear is a double LP written, produced and arranged by Marvin Gaye. The title cut sets the mood for the entire album with its laid back intro, group back-up vocals singing the melody, and a light keyboard line hovering in the background. It’s that kind of brooding and soulful mix that characterizes all of the songs on Here, My Dear. The best are the slow but funky Soul of Anger and A Funky Space Reincarnation, and the slick Falling In Love Again, Is That Enough, and Time To Get It Together


    MARVIN GAYE
    I Want You (Tamla 76)
    I Want You features an Ernie Barnes painting of a juke joint going crazy with a live band and dancers on the cover. Leon Ware produced and co-wrote all of the songs. As for musicians, Gaye had his pick from Chuck Rainey, Wilton Felder, James Gadson, David Walker, Dennis Coffey, amongst others. The mood for I Want You is set with the sensuous title track. That groove is continued with Come Live With Me Angel, After The Dance (Instrumental), All The Way Around, Since I Had You, Soon I’ll Be Loving You Again, and After The Dance (Vocal Version). This album really captures Marvin’s mid-70s sound from beginning to end.



    MARVIN GAYE
    Let’s Get It On (Tamla 73)
    Let’s Get It On is obviously one of Marvin Gaye’s most classic albums. Gaye and producer/writer Ed Townsend were responsible for the great success of the LP. The whole piece of work can be seen and heard as one long exaltation on love and relationships. Beginning with the title track, which needs no introduction, Gay goes through the seduction, hurt, loss and yearning that can happen between a man and a woman. There’s the pleading Please Don’t Stay (Once You Go Away), If I Should Die Tonight and Distant Lover to the jazzy and sex induced You Sure Love To Ball.



    MARVIN GAYE
    Live! (Tamla 74)
    After the great success of Let’s Get It On, Marvin Gaye took a two year long break from recording in the studio. Live! was released in the middle of this sabbatical, probably as a way to keep his name in the public’s mind. On the track listings, the songs are broken up into three parts: The Beginning, Fossil Medley and Now. The Beginning consists of early 70s tunes like Trouble Man, Inner City Blues, Distant Lover and Jan. Fossil Medley is a collection of his early 60s hits played with a slow groove such as Can I Get A Witness and Stubborn Kind Of Fellow. Now finishes the LP off with an energetic rendition of Let’s Get It On and What’s Going On. Together, Live! presents a great look into Gaye’s career up to that point. Also don’t miss the inside pictures, especially the large format one as it features Gaye in some huge, hi-heeled 70s boots.



    MAVIN GAYE
    Live At The London Palladium (Tamla 77)
    Live At The London Palladium is the better of Gaye’s two live albums, simply for the fact that it’s a 2-record set, which allows more opportunities to hear one of Gaye’s fine performances. The record contains Gaye’s full range of material, beginning with the height of his 70s work like Let’s Get It On with a sexy little breakdown towards the end, Distant Lover, Trouble Man, plus a big medley consisting of Inner City Blues, God Is Love, What’s Going On and Save The Children. Next he moves into his 60s material with a long medley including Ain’t That Peculiar, You’re A Wonderful One, Stubborn Kind Of Fellow, Pride And Joy, Little Darling (I Need You), and an especially strong version of I Heard It Through The Grapevine with a little rougher delivery than usual. Even his best duets are included with a medley done with Florence Lyles that includes You’re All I Need To Get By, Ain’t Nothing Like The Real Thing, Your Precious Love, It Takes Two, and Ain’t No Mountain High Enough. Of course, there’s also the added bonus that Live includes the 11-minute studio recording of Got To Give It Up, probably Gaye’s best dance tune. All in all, you get a great listen as well as little tidbits of Gaye’s personality as he stumbles and rambles through his little spoken interludes between numbers.
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v2...k-LP%20Covers/

  • #2
    Originally posted by Motown67

    Hear My Dear is a double LP written, produced and arranged by Marvin Gaye. The title cut sets the mood for the entire album with its laid back intro, group back-up vocals singing the melody, and a light keyboard line hovering in the background. It’s that kind of brooding and soulful mix that characterizes all of the songs on Here, My Dear. The best are the slow but funky Soul of Anger and A Funky Space Reincarnation, and the slick Falling In Love Again, Is That Enough, and Time To Get It Together .
    Really enjoy these reviews.
    Here, my Dear is a long standing fave of mine and I know the story of all the royalties going to his ex is well known (hence 'Here' rather than 'Hear').

    My personal fave is the laid back easy groove of Anna's Song...particularly the repeated and anguished cry of 'Anna.'

    Goosebumps me every single time I hear it!!
    <<Soul Strut 100>>Collectable CDs 1 Forumusic: April 2014 Collectable CDs 2<<'95 WOF>>

    Comment


    • #3
      Enjoyed the chart

      Love the track "Nom time to Burn" especially the intro....got the LP and as always happens with me it's a VERY wobbley rubbery vinyl that is only a few steps away from a flexi disc...Atlantic and other labels sure did get it wrong around that time....
      The Kerrie Biddle is always a winner and i'm sure i have the New London RnB LP but under a different name...really rings a bell with me,

      I'd Love to hear the two live Marvin LP's

      and the Ruby Jones....you got a little known gem there for sure...

      That was a great and very informative chart CHEERS
      Country be dyin like poor people do
      Hospitals be closing...doors to me and you (Lopazz - Blood)

      And here's some other stuff that i get up to...

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Serio...796469?fref=ts

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Motown67
        45 REVIEWS:


        JOE CHOPPER AND THE SWINGING 7 SOUL BAND
        Soul Pusher/For The Good Times (Lanor)
        Soul Pusher is a great upbeat Funk instrumental with the organ holding down lead duties backed by some sharp horn stabs. For The Good Times is a ballad.
        Also worth noting that this is basically the same tune as Cold Bear by The Gaturs, and in my opinion, this one has way more punch comapred to the somewhat boring Gaturs arrangement. Dunno which one came first... It's dirt cheap, can find it anywhere and it's long enough for a quick trip to the bogs for a piss when you're DJing with it. Plus people familiar with the Gaturs may well not know this tune, so you might turn a few heads - maybe... See Motown, your reviews need more of a DJ perspective!
        http://wakeupanddie.com
        http://weirdgearnyc.com
        http://makethingsmatter.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Nick Cope
          Also worth noting that this is basically the same tune as Cold Bear by The Gaturs, and in my opinion, this one has way more punch comapred to the somewhat boring Gaturs arrangement. Dunno which one came first... It's dirt cheap, can find it anywhere and it's long enough for a quick trip to the bogs for a piss when you're DJing with it. Plus people familiar with the Gaturs may well not know this tune, so you might turn a few heads - maybe... See Motown, your reviews need more of a DJ perspective!
          I never knew about the comparison between the 2 songs. I'll have to break out my Gaturs 45 and listen to them back to back now.
          http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v2...k-LP%20Covers/

          Comment

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