Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Gig

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Gig

    I was just looking at a piece in the Guardian that discussed the idea of the “gig economy”. It said that there is uncertainty about the derivation of the word “gig”. A quick look at some online dictionaries gives a few - to my mind - unlikely examples. No mention of the word “gigue” in the sense of dance.

    This seems pretty obvious. It is easy to imagine musicians talking about an engagement in that way.

    Am I just looking at the wrong line dictionaries?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Grim Lounge Cowboy View Post
    I was just looking at a piece in the Guardian that discussed the idea of the “gig economy”. It said that there is uncertainty about the derivation of the word “gig”. A quick look at some online dictionaries gives a few - to my mind - unlikely examples. No mention of the word “gigue” in the sense of dance.

    This seems pretty obvious. It is easy to imagine musicians talking about an engagement in that way.

    Am I just looking at the wrong line dictionaries?
    Interesting reading here if you've not seen it yet: https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...ement-as-a-gig

    Comment


    • #3
      "Gigue" doesn't convince me because it's pronounced with a soft g, and in etymology you usually need a very good reason for such a phonetic shift.
      Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

      Comment


      • #4
        https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2018/0...e-gig-economy/

        "In the same song where the brilliant lyricist Ian Dury gave the world the couplet, ‘I could be a writer with a growing reputation/ I could be the ticket-man at Fulham Broadway station’, his narrator speaks of ‘first-night nerves every one-night stand’. Perhaps we are now more accustomed to one-night stand referring to a casual sexual liaison, but in the less metaphorical sense, dating from the 19th century and was later used by Bernard Shaw, it simply means a one-night musical engagement, or gig.

        Gig is first recorded in 1926, in Melody Maker. By 1939 it had given rise to the modern-sounding gigster, someone who plays gigs. Now in our day, it has found a new outlet in the idea of the gig economy."

        That article also mentions the word "quangocracy" which I suspect is made-up.
        "White paper inner sleeve is pristine ..."

        Comment


        • #5
          A look-up in the 1991 hardcover issue of NTC`s Dictionary of American Slang offers four definitions as follows:
          1. a onetime job (Musicians.),
          2. to play or perform (Musicians.),
          3. any job of an assignment nature; a onetime job such as when a newspaper reporter is assigned to write a particular story,
          4. a bother; an annoyance (Black.)

          To the best of my understanding, linking infos 1 and 2 to info 3 you got the drift of the 'gig economy' term, which seems but a broader connotational elaboration embracing the concept of one-off wage labor phenomenon.
          More light shed on the word on here http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-gig1.htm
          Last edited by Funky Charly; 03-01-2020, 07:10 AM.
          DANCE TO THE RADIO

          Comment

          Working...
          X