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  • d7bohs
    replied
    Originally posted by AlanP View Post
    I'm liking the enthralled bit, and I can cope with his getting stuff wrong if it's done with a certain style.
    for mine though, the best bit of Maclaren-Ross et al, is discovering a whole new scene I never knew existed. and from a time I've only ever viewed in shoot-bang-fire terms.
    BTW, you probably know this, but book 10 of Anthony Powell's 'Dance to the Music of Time' , 'Books Do Furnish a Room' features as its central character the bohemian author, X. Trapnel, widely assumed to be based on MacLaren-Ross. Unusually, for one of the volumes of the 'Dance', it could be read alone, since many of the continuing characters from the previous volumes have been killed in the war, and the milieu it describes is quite different.

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  • AlanP
    replied
    Originally posted by d7bohs View Post
    I have that somewhere and remember it fondly - can't remember exactly where in the many scattered locations for books in this house it might be though....

    Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion. He could have done with an editor for a start and not just for length - for someone supposedly so clever and 'besotted with language', he gets a lot of stuff wrong......
    I'm liking the enthralled bit, and I can cope with his getting stuff wrong if it's done with a certain style.
    for mine though, the best bit of Maclaren-Ross et al, is discovering a whole new scene I never knew existed. and from a time I've only ever viewed in shoot-bang-fire terms.

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  • Expiry2011
    replied
    Val Wilmer's Mama Told Me There'd be Days Like These
    A very well put together autobiography about her experiences in the jazz world in both the UK and in the US. I can;t recommend this enough

    Daryl Easlie- Everybody Dance - Chic and the Politics of Disco
    Doesn't do what it says on the tin. In fact, despite saying that there would be lots of references to the politics around disco and the disco era there isn't nearly enough to put Chic into context. Having said that its a very thorough biography of an amazing career and it does give a good insight into the music of the period, as opposed to the clubs and the DJs

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  • eine
    replied
    Originally posted by son of stan View Post
    'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.
    Originally posted by AlanP View Post
    just started Barry Miles' London Calling: A Countercultural History of London since 1945.
    Both these look pretty good...

    Originally posted by d7bohs View Post
    Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion.
    Got to read this one day. Size is a drag, man.

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  • d7bohs
    replied
    Originally posted by AlanP View Post

    Now trying to trackdown Maclaren-Ross' 40s memoir which has the makings of a little ripper about it.
    I have that somewhere and remember it fondly - can't remember exactly where in the many scattered locations for books in this house it might be though....

    Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion. He could have done with an editor for a start and not just for length - for someone supposedly so clever and 'besotted with language', he gets a lot of stuff wrong......

    Leave a comment:


  • AlanP
    replied
    just started Barry Miles' London Calling: A Countercultural History of London since 1945.

    damn fine read so far and he's still banging on about the 40s - never heard of Tambimuttu and Julian Maclaren-Ross before but they seem like...well, the likes of Javis Cocker ain't got nothing on them.

    Now trying to trackdown Maclaren-Ross' 40s memoir which has the makings of a little ripper about it.

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  • son of stan
    replied
    You won't be disappointed.

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  • pitch
    replied
    Originally posted by son of stan View Post
    I am reading 'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.

    It's just brilliant. I have never read anything quite like it. Full of marginal historical insights. Hilarious, extended pisstaking, dry, droll deconstruction of Wheatley and his world.
    Looks great - promptly ordered

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  • son of stan
    replied
    I am reading 'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.

    It's just brilliant. I have never read anything quite like it. Full of marginal historical insights. Hilarious, extended pisstaking, dry, droll deconstruction of Wheatley and his world.

    Leave a comment:


  • eine
    replied
    I took a break from murk and read this, which a friend gave it to me. VERY short and really very good. I was surprised by how much it gripped me, actually.



    Been a while since I read any of his, but can also recommend Underworld (to a point) and White Noise (unreservedly).

    Am debating whether to go through with this one:



    It's a book about consciousness. And Rotherham. And it's pretty fucking intense.

    Also started this, and am hoping it will be as good as American Tabloid and the Cold Six Thousand...

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  • mp3000
    replied
    Psychotronic Encyclopedia Of Film. I had forgotten how good and laconic it is. Here is the complete review of Fellini's 8 1/2 : 'Barbara Steele plays Gloria Morin'.

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  • mp3000
    replied
    Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
    I've been reading the Derek Raymond 'Factory' books for the last couple of weeks. That chap veers wildly between dark, brilliant genius and wish fulfiling adolescent from paragraph to paragraph, though, on the whole, the former wins out.
    Fantastic books. I am sure I would like to meet the narrator though.

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  • ginghamkitchen
    replied
    Originally posted by babycart View Post
    "The Devil's Home on Leave" is the only book I've stopped reading because it made me feel nauseous. Something to do with body parts in binliners in the summer heat, but it was more generally oppressive as well.

    Have you read The Crust On Its Uppers, GK? I reckon that might be right up Eine's urban lowlife street, although I found it pretty hard work , to be honest.
    Yes, read the 'Crust' a while ago, there's something fake about it. Going to read 'A State Of Denmark' next - apparently his 1984 - then that'll do me I think.

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  • babycart
    replied
    Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
    I've been reading the Derek Raymond 'Factory' books for the last couple of weeks. That chap veers wildly between dark, brilliant genius and wish fulfiling adolescent from paragraph to paragraph, though, on the whole, the former wins out.
    "The Devil's Home on Leave" is the only book I've stopped reading because it made me feel nauseous. Something to do with body parts in binliners in the summer heat, but it was more generally oppressive as well.

    Have you read The Crust On Its Uppers, GK? I reckon that might be right up Eine's urban lowlife street, although I found it pretty hard work , to be honest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Filthy Rich
    replied
    "I've long been haunted by the memory of Bela Tarr's movie of the central portion of this novel, The Werckmeister Harmonies, and the novel has the same strange power - the words flow like 'liquid lava' according to its translator and it buries the world beneath itself leaving you a stranger in an un-human landscape.
    Some echoes of Sebald and Bernhard, and Kafka - every review mentions Dead Souls, which I've never read....."
    I like Kafka, I love Sebald, I enjoyed Dead Souls and that film... perhaps I should read this book.
    Just started A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving, never read him before but this is a lot of fun - kinda like a less flashy Infinite Jest in its writing style I'd say - a lot simpler but somehow reminiscent. Very funny as well. Laughed out loud a few times which is always a good thing.

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