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  • Just started Infinte Jest (David Foster Wallace) which is 980 pages long followed by another 100 pages of footnotes - so I guess I'll see you all in a couple of months.

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    • I've been getting stuck into Simon Reynold's Retromania.

      Part one (Now) is very interesting about how the internet /blogs /youtube /ebay/ popsike etc have altered how we experience music and the world in general. Section two (Then) seems to be a history of retro and has maybe less insight so far but is still interesting. Especially on the vast array of backward looking influences on punk and how they still seemed to eventually yield something new that wasn't what people wanted at all e.g. Greg Shaw of Bomp being disgusted at how ugly and political it was and so inventing Power Pop as a way of revisiting the lost teenage eden of rock and roll.

      Section three is titled Future.

      To be honest I've been barelling through it so will probabyl miss ideas and need to go back.
      Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

      John Peel

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      • Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
        I've been getting stuck into Simon Reynold's Retromania.
        Thanks for the quick review Mark, this is on my hit list...
        If you're looking for a pristine copy then this isn't the one for you. The vinyl looks like someone has polished their brickwork with it and the label has been ruined by some fool with a pen.

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        • Originally posted by babycart View Post
          am always surprised at how overlooked he is
          I couldn't believe, when I was reading The Insult, that I hadn't heard of the author - the prose was amazing, so well written, just my thought of thing, and it was published at a time when I was buying and reading a lot... well I will definitely read another. Do you know what 'The Five Gates of Hell' is like, or his recent memoir 'This Party's Got To Stop'?.

          Keep us updated Rich... I've only read Brief Interviews... by Wallace and would love to get stuck into Infinte Jest - but I need short sharp shocks right now, as I'm ploughing through lots of words in the daytimes.

          Started this last night in bed, and couldn't put it down. Lots of bittersweet sleepy lolz:

          Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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          • Been reading a lot of jazz stuff that I've picked up in various second hand shops
            I would recommend:
            John Sangster - Swining from the Rafters - his autobiography which gives a very good account of the drink-fueled Oz jazz scene. I particularly like the part when he is in New York and trys to get his band-mates to listen to Sun Ra

            JC Thomas - Chasin' the Trane - early biography of the great man. I never knew he was addicted to sweets and lost his teeth

            Norman Weinsteni - A Night in Tunisia - a fascinating but slightly flawed book that exposes the links between US jazz and US ideas about Africa

            Philip Larkin - Larkin's Jazz: Essays and Reviews - more from the trad-jazz loving, modern-jazz hating, poet. Some amazing writing and insightful comment and lots to challenge my notions of jazz
            "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

            Night of the Living Vinyl

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            • Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
              I've been getting stuck into Simon Reynold's Retromania.

              Part one (Now) is very interesting about how the internet /blogs /youtube /ebay/ popsike etc have altered how we experience music and the world in general. Section two (Then) seems to be a history of retro and has maybe less insight so far but is still interesting. Especially on the vast array of backward looking influences on punk and how they still seemed to eventually yield something new that wasn't what people wanted at all e.g. Greg Shaw of Bomp being disgusted at how ugly and political it was and so inventing Power Pop as a way of revisiting the lost teenage eden of rock and roll.

              Section three is titled Future.

              To be honest I've been barelling through it so will probabyl miss ideas and need to go back.
              This is one of the titles I am reading slowly in the daytime as I'm doing a review. I was going to post something about it in the thread once I'd finished it, but since you've mentioned it here, I think you're spot on with the ideas thing - it's packed with them. Reynolds complains about ipodification but he rips through theory like a 14 year old surruptiously checking out his older sister's iPod.

              It's a brilliant book though, and doesn't deserve the drubbing it got in the other thread about it here. I can't imagine anyone who posts here not being interested by it's contents: big recommend!

              Also, 45cat gets a mention in it!!!
              Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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              • "Keep us updated Rich... I've only read Brief Interviews... by Wallace and would love to get stuck into Infinte Jest - but I need short sharp shocks right now, as I'm ploughing through lots of words in the daytimes."
                That's the only one I've read so far - a mixture of the brilliant/hilarious and the irritating to my mind - but this is quite different (going by the first 100 pages or so) while obviously still springing from the same pen.
                Never heard of Rupert Thomson - sigh, another one for the list.

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                • Originally posted by eine View Post
                  Do you know what 'The Five Gates of Hell' is like, or his recent memoir 'This Party's Got To Stop'?.
                  ]
                  I can't really remember Five Gates, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. There's loads of good books I can't remember much about, and I read that one years ago.

                  I'm a bit wary of memoirs, too, but I'd be willing to give his a go.

                  His lack of recognition is probably to do with the way literary Britain hypes young writers. He was never one of the Granta mob, or any other movement.He just keeps popping up with coolly delirious books that are well-reviewed and then politely forgotten.
                  He lived abroad for years and that distance is apparent in his books, in a way that it isn't in, say, Mitchell, Geoff Dyer and even Davis Peace, who all adopt foreign influences but write about Britain as natives. Thomson's Britain was always foreign - an exile's illusion.
                  I think the last novel showed a change, though.
                  Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                  • Originally posted by eine View Post
                    This is one of the titles I am reading slowly in the daytime as I'm doing a review. I was going to post something about it in the thread once I'd finished it, but since you've mentioned it here, I think you're spot on with the ideas thing - it's packed with them. Reynolds complains about ipodification but he rips through theory like a 14 year old surruptiously checking out his older sister's iPod.

                    It's a brilliant book though, and doesn't deserve the drubbing it got in the other thread about it here. I can't imagine anyone who posts here not being interested by it's contents: big recommend!

                    Also, 45cat gets a mention in it!!!
                    Indeed - though he is pretty self aware and ambivalent. I was relieved that I never got as bad as him for hitting the blog/rapidshare downloads of albums things. He says at one point he had 30 downloading simultaneously. Roughly a days music accumulated in an hour. So hard not to realise you're grabbing more than you can ever digest.

                    The other thread was largely based on the blurb, nobdoy had read it, so I reckoned time for a more nuanced discussion.

                    And I saw the US edition - a MUCH better cover.
                    Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                    John Peel

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                    • Just checked the US edition. Not hard to be an improvement as the UK is "maximum cover shit".
                      Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                      • A Chris Ware collection - beauty and misery all in one huge book.

                        The Rusty Brown obsessive collector character reminded me of ALL of you.

                        http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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                        • "Keep us updated Rich... I've only read Brief Interviews... by Wallace and would love to get stuck into Infinte Jest - but I need short sharp shocks right now, as I'm ploughing through lots of words in the daytimes."
                          Oh yeah, finished it a week or so ago but forgot to say. I could write a lot about it but simpler to say - just read it it's fantastic.

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                          • Just finished reading the Culture Club which is based on the radio shows some art history buff does in Australia - his schick is to connect fringe art/ philosophical movements with more mainstream music/ pop culture elements.

                            really enjoyed it, and I can now hold a very brief conversation on the impact/ aims of Fluxus and Throbbing Gristle. well maybe, I might need a little refresher first.

                            among other subjects he makes a compelling case for the inspiration behind John Cale's musical direction and the path that lead the Beatles to Number Nine.

                            and to think, the author's an Aussie...who knew?

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                            • The Crane Bag by Robert Graves
                              Collection of diverse 60s essays on poltergeists in Scotland, bullfighting, and various other subjects.
                              In The Idiom of the People he discusses coded references in English folk music, 'plucking flowers' for having sex, 'wearing ones apron up to the chin' for being pregnant, and he comes up with a typically erudite alternative Gaelic explanation for why 'foggy dew' means old maidhood/spinsterhood.

                              I realised one of the songs he quoted was very similar to a Shirley collins one I d/led from Folkishienne's great folk chart

                              The song is probably a massive folk riddim that has been versioned more times than Sleng Teng, but i enjoyed making the link.
                              Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                              • I'm about 50 pages in to this one and am hooked:

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