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Of late I have mostly been reading...

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  • I've just finished reading this:



    Its billed as a kind of biography of Robert Johnson but its actually a wonderful, insightful look at why the myth of blues as all about men with guitars wandering the Delta is way off. It also works as a great history of the blues as it was actually enjoyed at various points throughout the twentieth century. Brilliant and thought-provoking.

    Has anybody read the author's How The Beatles Destroyed Rock'n'Roll? It seems as if he does a similar thing with that book - myth-busting by looking at what people actually liked.
    Mixes, compilations and the like

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    • Originally posted by medlar View Post
      Nice one Jim, shall investigate
      Its obviously a football book but its more about the Italian love of football and their home-towns that anything else.
      Mixes, compilations and the like

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      • A lot of Richard Brautigan poetry. Someone on here turned me onto him - not sure who. I'm very grateful.

        Can anyone recommend similar poets?
        http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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        • Originally posted by Mr Naga View Post
          A lot of Richard Brautigan poetry. Someone on here turned me onto him - not sure who. I'm very grateful.

          Can anyone recommend similar poets?
          I'm only familiar with some of Brautigan's short stories. Those had shades of Ivor Cutler about them so he might just tickle your fancy.

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          • I've long been haunted by the memory of Bela Tarr's movie of the central portion of this novel, The Werckmeister Harmonies, and the novel has the same strange power - the words flow like 'liquid lava' according to its translator and it buries the world beneath itself leaving you a stranger in an un-human landscape.

            Some echoes of Sebald and Bernhard, and Kafka - every review mentions Dead Souls, which I've never read.....
            Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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            • I've been reading the Derek Raymond 'Factory' books for the last couple of weeks. That chap veers wildly between dark, brilliant genius and wish fulfiling adolescent from paragraph to paragraph, though, on the whole, the former wins out.
              SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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              • "I've long been haunted by the memory of Bela Tarr's movie of the central portion of this novel, The Werckmeister Harmonies, and the novel has the same strange power - the words flow like 'liquid lava' according to its translator and it buries the world beneath itself leaving you a stranger in an un-human landscape.
                Some echoes of Sebald and Bernhard, and Kafka - every review mentions Dead Souls, which I've never read....."
                I like Kafka, I love Sebald, I enjoyed Dead Souls and that film... perhaps I should read this book.
                Just started A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving, never read him before but this is a lot of fun - kinda like a less flashy Infinite Jest in its writing style I'd say - a lot simpler but somehow reminiscent. Very funny as well. Laughed out loud a few times which is always a good thing.

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                • Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                  I've been reading the Derek Raymond 'Factory' books for the last couple of weeks. That chap veers wildly between dark, brilliant genius and wish fulfiling adolescent from paragraph to paragraph, though, on the whole, the former wins out.
                  "The Devil's Home on Leave" is the only book I've stopped reading because it made me feel nauseous. Something to do with body parts in binliners in the summer heat, but it was more generally oppressive as well.

                  Have you read The Crust On Its Uppers, GK? I reckon that might be right up Eine's urban lowlife street, although I found it pretty hard work , to be honest.
                  Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                  • Originally posted by babycart View Post
                    "The Devil's Home on Leave" is the only book I've stopped reading because it made me feel nauseous. Something to do with body parts in binliners in the summer heat, but it was more generally oppressive as well.

                    Have you read The Crust On Its Uppers, GK? I reckon that might be right up Eine's urban lowlife street, although I found it pretty hard work , to be honest.
                    Yes, read the 'Crust' a while ago, there's something fake about it. Going to read 'A State Of Denmark' next - apparently his 1984 - then that'll do me I think.
                    SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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                    • Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                      I've been reading the Derek Raymond 'Factory' books for the last couple of weeks. That chap veers wildly between dark, brilliant genius and wish fulfiling adolescent from paragraph to paragraph, though, on the whole, the former wins out.
                      Fantastic books. I am sure I would like to meet the narrator though.

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                      • Psychotronic Encyclopedia Of Film. I had forgotten how good and laconic it is. Here is the complete review of Fellini's 8 1/2 : 'Barbara Steele plays Gloria Morin'.

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                        • I took a break from murk and read this, which a friend gave it to me. VERY short and really very good. I was surprised by how much it gripped me, actually.



                          Been a while since I read any of his, but can also recommend Underworld (to a point) and White Noise (unreservedly).

                          Am debating whether to go through with this one:



                          It's a book about consciousness. And Rotherham. And it's pretty fucking intense.

                          Also started this, and am hoping it will be as good as American Tabloid and the Cold Six Thousand...

                          Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                          • I am reading 'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.

                            It's just brilliant. I have never read anything quite like it. Full of marginal historical insights. Hilarious, extended pisstaking, dry, droll deconstruction of Wheatley and his world.
                            Endless Tripe

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                            • Originally posted by son of stan View Post
                              I am reading 'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.

                              It's just brilliant. I have never read anything quite like it. Full of marginal historical insights. Hilarious, extended pisstaking, dry, droll deconstruction of Wheatley and his world.
                              Looks great - promptly ordered
                              "Ridicule is nothing to be scared of"

                              www.myspace.com/illustratedlondonnoise*********illustratedlondonnoise.blogspot.com

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                              • You won't be disappointed.
                                Endless Tripe

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