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  • just started Barry Miles' London Calling: A Countercultural History of London since 1945.

    damn fine read so far and he's still banging on about the 40s - never heard of Tambimuttu and Julian Maclaren-Ross before but they seem like...well, the likes of Javis Cocker ain't got nothing on them.

    Now trying to trackdown Maclaren-Ross' 40s memoir which has the makings of a little ripper about it.

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    • Originally posted by AlanP View Post

      Now trying to trackdown Maclaren-Ross' 40s memoir which has the makings of a little ripper about it.
      I have that somewhere and remember it fondly - can't remember exactly where in the many scattered locations for books in this house it might be though....

      Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion. He could have done with an editor for a start and not just for length - for someone supposedly so clever and 'besotted with language', he gets a lot of stuff wrong......
      Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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      • Originally posted by son of stan View Post
        'The Devil Is A Gentleman (the life and times of Dennis Wheatley)' by Phil Baker.
        Originally posted by AlanP View Post
        just started Barry Miles' London Calling: A Countercultural History of London since 1945.
        Both these look pretty good...

        Originally posted by d7bohs View Post
        Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion.
        Got to read this one day. Size is a drag, man.
        Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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        • Val Wilmer's Mama Told Me There'd be Days Like These
          A very well put together autobiography about her experiences in the jazz world in both the UK and in the US. I can;t recommend this enough

          Daryl Easlie- Everybody Dance - Chic and the Politics of Disco
          Doesn't do what it says on the tin. In fact, despite saying that there would be lots of references to the politics around disco and the disco era there isn't nearly enough to put Chic into context. Having said that its a very thorough biography of an amazing career and it does give a good insight into the music of the period, as opposed to the clubs and the DJs
          "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

          Night of the Living Vinyl

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          • Originally posted by d7bohs View Post
            I have that somewhere and remember it fondly - can't remember exactly where in the many scattered locations for books in this house it might be though....

            Just finished Infinite Jest with a sort of enthralled annoyance being the governing emotion. He could have done with an editor for a start and not just for length - for someone supposedly so clever and 'besotted with language', he gets a lot of stuff wrong......
            I'm liking the enthralled bit, and I can cope with his getting stuff wrong if it's done with a certain style.
            for mine though, the best bit of Maclaren-Ross et al, is discovering a whole new scene I never knew existed. and from a time I've only ever viewed in shoot-bang-fire terms.

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            • Originally posted by AlanP View Post
              I'm liking the enthralled bit, and I can cope with his getting stuff wrong if it's done with a certain style.
              for mine though, the best bit of Maclaren-Ross et al, is discovering a whole new scene I never knew existed. and from a time I've only ever viewed in shoot-bang-fire terms.
              BTW, you probably know this, but book 10 of Anthony Powell's 'Dance to the Music of Time' , 'Books Do Furnish a Room' features as its central character the bohemian author, X. Trapnel, widely assumed to be based on MacLaren-Ross. Unusually, for one of the volumes of the 'Dance', it could be read alone, since many of the continuing characters from the previous volumes have been killed in the war, and the milieu it describes is quite different.
              Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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              • Have been reading almost more than I've been listening to music of late.
                The last four books I have read were these:



                All highly recommended if any of the subject matter should be of interest.
                To infinity - and beyond!

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                • The Berman most definitely. Have been meaning to read that for an age, but just cant get past Rob Young's Electric Eden. It's massive and I can only manage about a page a night before I'm asleep.
                  Back and to the left... back and to the left... back and to the left

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                  • I can't recommend this enough:



                    It's a book about the OG Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich 1916... about DaDa, the twentieth century, art, socialism gone awry, poetry, funny haw-haws, state oppression, words, all framed around an imaginary chess game between Lenin and Tristan Tzara (the daddy of DaDa). Sounds in danger of being po-faced wanky shit?? It does, I give you that... but it's a quick, fun, entertaining, enlightening read. And cheap - get hold of a copy!!
                    Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                    • ...and I haven't been reading this. But new Michael Chabon US cover looks like this:



                      And for the promo

                      The novel, planned for a Sept. 11 release, is set in Oakland, Calif., in 2004, and in it, main characters Nat and Archy run a used-records store called Brokeland Records that is threatened by plans for a new megastore nearby on Telegraph Avenue.

                      To launch the book, the Harper imprint's marketing team plans to convert Oakland bookstore Diesel into a pop-up store called Brokeland Records. From Sept. 7 to Sept. 14, the pop-up store will sell used jazz records provided by an independent record dealer named Berigan Taylor.

                      Harper is creating exterior Brokeland Records signs to temporarily replace the Diesel signs, as well as Brokeland Records bags, buttons, and stamps for book purchases made during the week. There will also be a landing page for "Diesel in Brokeland" on Diesel's website.

                      On Sept. 12, the pop-up store will host a launch party for Mr. Chabon that will also serve as a fundraiser for 826, a nonprofit organization that provides writing classes and tutoring for students. Mr. Chabon will donate an 8-track player and a "Telegraph Avenue" mixtape that will be raffled off as prizes.
                      Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                      • Originally posted by eine View Post
                        It's a book about the OG Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich 1916... about DaDa, the twentieth century, art, socialism gone awry, poetry, funny haw-haws, state oppression, words, all framed around an imaginary chess game between Lenin and Tristan Tzara (the daddy of DaDa). Sounds in danger of being po-faced wanky shit?? It does, I give you that... but it's a quick, fun, entertaining, enlightening read. And cheap - get hold of a copy!!
                        From when Tom Stoppard was good, Travesties is great fun and covers Tzara and Lenin in Zurich, stirring in Joyce who was also knocking around at the time, for good measure.



                        I read this again. Himes' last Coffin Ed and Grave Digger book, and the one in which the lid finally bursts off the pressure cooker.
                        Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                        • Never read any Chester Himes, although I have a few 'to read'. Recommendations?

                          Originally posted by babycart View Post
                          From when Tom Stoppard was good, Travesties is great fun and covers Tzara and Lenin in Zurich, stirring in Joyce who was also knocking around at the time, for good measure.
                          Yeah the book mentions that play, and throws in a little Joyce as well. I seriously recommend it - best book I've read in ages.

                          Have just read this for the Sheffield connection



                          Not bad, and will be useful to teach KULTUR to new students in Sheffield, but you have to be either a fan of Pulp or Sheffield to really dig it. It could also have done with a proofread. Am onto his latest now,



                          I am very jealous of his writing style. It's effortless and yet clever and funny.
                          Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                          • Also dipping back into this on the side --



                            Judge Anderson rules man! Big up!
                            Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                            • Recommended reading.....The Chitlin' Circuit and the Road to Rock n Roll by Preston Lauterbach...... entertaining and educational history of the characters and the network of venues that sprang up from the 1920s onwards allowing black artists and especially black entrepreneurs to thrive. It doesn't go much beyond the 1950s but it will appeal to most fans of American music. A thumbs-up from me.

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                              • Originally posted by eine View Post
                                Never read any Chester Himes, although I have a few 'to read'. Recommendations?
                                .
                                The Real Cool Killers is about my favourite of his 'normal' crime novels, although they're all fun. Blind Man is just chaos.
                                Never read his straight novels, but I have read his short stories, some of which are excellent and stick in the mind.

                                I get my books mostly off aeroplanes these days, and have been enjoying a few of Jo Nesbo's crime novels, which are well-translated and genuinely funny.

                                Swedish and Danish plussers, please rep your favourite national crime novelists to change my opinion that Norway is whupping your asses in the 'blood and snow' genre.
                                Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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