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  • Originally posted by eine View Post
    What's the 'History of the Analogue Record' book like?
    Expensive! Might be one to order in for the library.

    But I'm enjoying it - it is part 'pure' history (but noticeably it is 'A' history, not 'the' history). It is themed into eight chapters that stop it being chronological, more a series of case studies of aspects of the record. I've had a fair few of these Ashgate books and I'd say (so far) that this is the both the most enjoyable and the most well written.

    the chapters...

    The Groove
    The Disc
    The Label
    Vinyl
    The LP
    The 45
    The B-side and the 12" Single
    The Sleeve

    Sample

    This chapter traces the evolution and development of the grooved recording. it also examines the ways that the groove has been thought about and used. The groove has particular qualities: it is indexical and yet it can exist in its own right. As a consequence, there has been a fascination with its appearance: from the beginnings of recorded sound people have sought to understand its graphic traces. there has also been a fascination with the fact that the groove can be touched: people have taken advantage of the fact that these patterns of sound can be accessed and manipulated.Finally , there has been fascination with the groove's mortality. The groove was the first means of preserving a 'record' of sound; however the groove itself also needed to be preserved. Its aging process has been the source of both frustration and pleasure.

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    • Originally posted by eine View Post
      I started it, but got put off by the fiction bits. It's by the bed for when I'm ready.
      After enjoying Ocean of Sound, I thought Exotica was a big disappointment. Can't really remember much about it now, except that the fiction bits were dreadful and after several years on the Exotica mailing list I didn't really learn anything new

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Deep Down Heavy View Post


        Simultaneously reading these three and trying not to get confused...
        I am intrigued by the Biker book - any good? Also is it written by John Wooley who did that Belgian garage rock tune You're Lying?
        Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

        John Peel

        Comment


        • Originally posted by bongolia View Post
          After enjoying Ocean of Sound, I thought Exotica was a big disappointment. Can't really remember much about it now, except that the fiction bits were dreadful and after several years on the Exotica mailing list I didn't really learn anything new
          I didn't properly read it but I got the impression that the Exotica book wasn't about the genre but a wider take on the exotic and other in music. I think he's a really interesting writer but not someone you go to for information but for ideas and an alternative thoughtful perspective on music and listening. I've been picking at his new one Sinister Resonance in between more serious bookclub related stuff. Currently on Orlando which is nicely written but insofar as its an extended in-joke/love letter I struggle to give a shit.
          Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

          John Peel

          Comment


          • Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
            Also is it written by John Wooley who did that Belgian garage rock tune You're Lying?
            Woolley.
            You freeking scientologists are all the same, quible, dribble and then demand ice creams. Ohhhhhhhhhhh.

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            • Just finished "The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica" by John Calvin Batchelor, appropriate, given the turn of weather.

              This review sums it up well:

              Editorial Review - Kirkus Reviews
              Ambitious, daunting, uneven: Batchelor has assembled a near-satiric, woefully dense forecast of doomsday chaos, blending various Norse myth-sagas with Beowulf, thoughtful attempts at a system of political ethics (cf. The Further Adventures of Halley's Comet, 1980) with sea-fiction à la Melville. In overall design, the book does have grace. It tells the story of one Grim Fiddle, born of a Swedish mother (Lamba Time-Thief) and an American draft-dodger (Peregrine Ide), who lives in late-1980s Sweden, an intriguing land of xenophobic fury--the leading edge of a world-collapse that involves cholera epidemics, a vast sea-borne class of ""the wretched"" (unable to find a land to take them in), and a precipitous moral drop into a new Dark Ages. Batchelor, employing a character named Charity Bentham, a Nobel Prize winner, pegs much of this barbarity on the steady rise of a new utilitarianism: pleasures taken, pains discounted, charities hypocritical. And when Grim Fiddle is exiled, he finds himself involved with one government after another that inevitably slides into barbarity, thanks to ""New Benthamite"" influence. From Sweden, Grim and crew go by sailing ship and finally reach the Falkland Islands, still in turmoil--with fighting between the ex-British Volunteers and the ""Patties"" (Patagonians). Driven from there, and met half-way by encroaching black ice, they make port next in Antarctica--which, by 1999, has become the dumping ground for the world's sick, poor, hopeless, and dissident. But the republic of the title, headed by Grim, is a deplorably murky affair--because Batchelor has by this time so wrapped himself in the resonances of political essay and Norse mythological parallel that he's unable to deliver anything like a clear, vivid narrative. Too pretentious and clotted for most readers, then, especially after the engaging first third; but the sea-scenes are picturesque, the futurology is provocative, and those inclined will appreciate the tart, even moving, ruminations on ethics.
              some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

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              • Originally posted by Rich Hero View Post
                Woolley.
                Could still be the same guy. Biker's are not always good on book learning.
                Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                John Peel

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Rich Hero View Post
                  Woolley.
                  How about for the sake of consistency you start trolling the FB record selling group 'cos a well known record seller spelt it one l there week.
                  Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                  John Peel

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
                    How about for the sake of consistency you start trolling the FB record selling group 'cos a well known record seller spelt it one l there week.
                    Erm, pardon?
                    You freeking scientologists are all the same, quible, dribble and then demand ice creams. Ohhhhhhhhhhh.

                    Comment


                    • A friend has just alerted me to this, which I will definitely be reading:

                      "Turn on, tune in, but don't drop out: The impact of neo-liberalism on magic mushroom users' (in)ability to imagine collectivist social worlds."

                      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20810266
                      Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by eine View Post
                        A friend has just alerted me to this, which I will definitely be reading:

                        "Turn on, tune in, but don't drop out: The impact of neo-liberalism on magic mushroom users' (in)ability to imagine collectivist social worlds."

                        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20810266
                        As you seem to be in a mood to read about drugs, have you read Storming Heaven by Jay Stevens? Give a great overview of the rise of LSD use in the US and how it went from opening the doors of perception to being a sure way to go crazy.
                        Haven't picked it up for years - must do when I get home
                        "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

                        Night of the Living Vinyl

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                        • Am always in the mood to read about drugs, saves me from doing any

                          And I have that, but have only dipped in. Sounds worthwhile, will dig it out...
                          Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Expiry2011 View Post
                            As you seem to be in a mood to read about drugs, have you read Storming Heaven by Jay Stevens? Give a great overview of the rise of LSD use in the US and how it went from opening the doors of perception to being a sure way to go crazy.
                            Haven't picked it up for years - must do when I get home
                            Yes, I was impressed with this ,but it has been like 25 years ago since I read it.
                            record licker

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                            • Originally posted by eine View Post
                              A friend has just alerted me to this, which I will definitely be reading:

                              "Turn on, tune in, but don't drop out: The impact of neo-liberalism on magic mushroom users' (in)ability to imagine collectivist social worlds."

                              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20810266
                              Collective social worlds were the furthest thing from my mind the last time I ingested some of those little foul tasting critters.
                              record licker

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by relkeel View Post
                                Collective social worlds were the furthest thing from my mind the last time I ingested some of those little foul tasting critters.
                                Me too. I was too busy burying my shirt to muse on utopia.
                                Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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