Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Of late I have mostly been reading...

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by space debris View Post
    Hey Babycart - whatever happened to **SPOILER ALERT** ??

    Whoops, sorry. Go for Oedipus instead, then. You'll never guess who he ends up shagging!
    Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by J.R View Post
      The classic I always recommend is Vile Bodies. A book which completely floored me on reading it. It's a book of two halves: the first: high farce the second: bitterness & bleakness. It's obviously subjective and an opinion which is not commonly shared but I think it's one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. Actually, 100% of the people I force it upon disagree with me. The majority don't even like it.
      I like it, but I would argue for 'A Handful Of Dust' as Waugh's greatest. Waugh is very under-rated as a writer these days, people write him off because he was a reactionary right wing bigot that made his kids watch him eat the first banana after rationing. I think he's a genius.
      SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

      Comment


      • #18
        I'm reading Richard Thompson's "Strange Affair" biography, which is flawed but still pretty good. Just got to the Richard and Linda break-up tour, oof!

        I started reading this to have a break from reading Sherlock Holmes which I got a bit obsessed with. My girlfriend bought me the facsimile version of the original Strand magazines in two omnibus editions (omnibi?). I've read all the ones that Sidney Paget illustrated now and both the stories and illustrations are amazing.
        Last edited by Hooded Claw; 28-01-2010, 02:48 PM.

        Comment


        • #19
          always liked Zola. 'Germinal' is well worth a read.Ahead of his time - predicted what thatcher would do to coal industry 100 years later!

          Now reading Richard Dawkins 'the god delusion'. The documentaries were very good also.
          "THIS IS A FINE TAPE AND BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF YESTERYEAR WHEN THE MUSIC WORLD WAS GOOD AND NOT FOULED UP BY THE LONG HAIR SCURVES WHO JUST BEAT WILDLY ON ANYTHING AND COME UP WITH A LOT OF STUPID NOISE THat only damnfools and liars say they like it"

          Comment


          • #20
            bit of an elmore leonard tip right now. Read Freaky Deaky (see sad story of book left on train) and just finished Out Of Sight last night. as much as I love his style of writing, i need a break so I''m going to wander into the book shop at Euston tonight and buy a different kind of book for my 2.5 hour journey home.
            I know your game Lionel! I can see what you really are!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by babycart View Post
              Whoops, sorry. Go for Oedipus instead, then. You'll never guess who he ends up shagging!
              Bruce Willis?
              I know your game Lionel! I can see what you really are!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                I like it, but I would argue for 'A Handful Of Dust' as Waugh's greatest. Waugh is very under-rated as a writer these days, people write him off because he was a reactionary right wing bigot that made his kids watch him eat the first banana after rationing. I think he's a genius.
                I like Dust, too, although it loses its way in the jungle at the end. I think Decline and Fall is his other really good book, and as relevant as ever today now that we're all about to be screwed over by the Bollinger Club.

                Brideshead, Scoop, Black Mischief and the first of the war trilogy did nothing for me, though. I blame conversion to catholicism, which more or less did for Greene and Chesterton too.
                Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by babycart View Post
                  I like Dust, too, although it loses its way in the jungle at the end. I think Decline and Fall is his other really good book, and as relevant as ever today now that we're all about to be screwed over by the Bollinger Club.

                  Brideshead, Scoop, Black Mischief and the first of the war trilogy did nothing for me, though. I blame conversion to catholicism, which more or less did for Greene and Chesterton too.
                  The Sword Of Honour gets better as it goes along. 'The Ordeal Of Gilbert Pinfold' is worth reading too, although the ending is a bit forced. I've never read any of his travel books - I'm terrified of the way I think he would describe Abyssinians and other races.
                  Last edited by ginghamkitchen; 29-01-2010, 01:06 PM.
                  SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I'm juggling the new James Ellroy "blood's a rover" and Jan Morris' "Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere". Polar opposites, in some ways, but both utterly absorbing and transporting.
                    Tracks & Grooves - Last Thursday of each month at MILK, Merchants Place, Reading. All-style vinyl throwdown.
                    follow the dilletante @tracksgrooves

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      "The Lawyer's Guide To Records Management & Retention"

                      Rivetting stuff I'm sure you'll all agree
                      some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        http://www.collectorsfrenzy.com

                        research for the purpose of pruning.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Best thing I've read recently was the Girl With the Dragon Tatoo by Steig Larson
                          Totally rivetting.
                          Unlike most thrillers its impossible to guess what's coming next

                          On a heavier tip I've just finished Collecting in a Consumer Society by Russell Belk - an analysis of why people collect. Also fascinating in its way

                          If you are looking for a classic can I recommend this:

                          http://www.amazon.co.uk/Life-Users-M...4694736&sr=1-2

                          Since a friend of mine recommended it to me I must have read it about four times. Its not a novel in the sense of a story with a begining middle and end but it is completely absorbing
                          "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

                          Night of the Living Vinyl

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by son of stan View Post
                            I'd also recommend reading Ὀδύσσεια (the Odyssey) - in the original latin, of course....
                            I think you'll find the original is in Homeric Greek. Beware cheap Roman copies!
                            "Ridicule is nothing to be scared of"

                            www.myspace.com/illustratedlondonnoise*********illustratedlondonnoise.blogspot.com

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by pitch View Post
                              I think you'll find the original is in Homeric Greek. Beware cheap Roman copies!
                              dear oh dear, Son of Stan strikes again.

                              whoever will be next?

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Brideshead, Scoop, Black Mischief and the first of the war trilogy did nothing for me, though. I blame conversion to catholicism, which more or less did for Greene and Chesterton too.
                                I lose interest after scoop but before and up to that I love them. I agree he's under-rated. Whenever I bring him up in conversation, it's usually met with "yeah, I tried to read Brideshead Revisited but didn't like it" as though it was the only thing he wrote. But then, I too failed to score with Brideshead and may not have explored his writings further if that had been the first book by him I had tried to read.

                                I've never read any of his travel books - I'm terrified of the way I think he would describe Abyssians and other races.
                                My wife bought me his complete Travel writings a couple of years ago and I've not even browsed through it, for much the same reason. It just sits on the shelf so she thinks I like it.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X