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  • Mr Naga
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    I've been reading a lot of comics recently and Harrow County is worth a look if you like horror comics. It's beautifully drawn too.

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  • ginghamkitchen
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    No replies as yet.

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  • Sonovox
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    The Last Policeman trilogy by Ben H. Winters. So, a giant asteroid of dinosaur-killer dimensions is going to hit the Earth shortly, civilization is falling apart, and you're a detective in a murder mystery trilogy. Is it even worth bothering? Yeah, it's cheesy as hell, but it's great fun - I love a bit of apocalypse fiction, me, and I went straight through the lot. Nice genre mash-up.

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  • Sonovox
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    Byzantium: The Apogee - John Julius Norwich. The central book of a trilogy (I haven't read either of the others) covering roughly the years 800 - 1100 when the Byzantine empire was at its height, an era I was previously very hazy on. This is an epic and compelling sweep of history encompassing serial usurpation, treachery, blinding, castration, more blinding, religious slugfests, poisoning, conniving, battle, blinding, enforced tonsure, and above all, blinding (they were quite keen on blinding). And a great read.

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  • Sonovox
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    Huysmans - Against Nature.

    Ripped through this one super fast (by my present day standards) laughing all the way. This is hilarious, and one of the reasons is the absolute accuracy with which he nails aesthetic snobbery / mindset of the collector. From the liqueur organ that Des Esseintes devises, to the description of his botanical acquisitions, to the relentless cataloguing of his collection of Latin books including extensive description of his favourite florid, "degenerate" and stylistically convoluted writers, it seemed to me that I was seeing all the follies and foibles of the record collector.

    I also feel like I don't need to ever read another book featuring a neurotic jaded dissipated antihero figure, I am hoping this lets me off the hook for Robert Musil's "The Man Without Qualities" at least.

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  • Headless mermaid
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    Just found some Old Danish issues of MM from '84 feat. Grandmaster Flash and D.St. Still remember Melle Mel's interview. Good stuff.

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  • Shere Khan
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    Originally posted by Sonovox View Post
    Despite years of pounding the second hand SF paperback beat, I pulled a fair wodge from Oxfams vintage SF 2-for-a-pound table today to add to the reading queue...


    That Keith Roberts Pavane is classic. I introduced my son to Keith Roberts when he was at school and he wrote a concept CD based on Roberts' Kiteworld book! Some of it is here on the old myspace page. I miss the old myspace days.

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  • eine
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    I do, or at least I'm a member. I don't really use it to be honest.

    I've read three of late:



    David Foster Wallace—The Pale King

    An incredible book about capitalism, boredom and concentration, set in a tax office where there is a plot afoot about psychics and computers. Except the plot never really manifests becasue DFW committed suicide before he finished. It doesn't make the book any less readable. DFW proves that realism in fiction is impossible by making every moment potentially endless. I love the style, and attempted to ape it myself in this post (apologies to candiman). Recommended to plusses who like big books and lots of words.



    Sarban—The Sound Of His Horn

    An alternate history of time travel where Nazis won the war. Written by a British diplomat in 1952, there is a lot in this short book about fascism, technology, nature, love, sex and violence. Richly deserves it's cult status appellation. What you see here is the second printing of the Amercian paperback edition from 1960, itself quite an expensive book. OGs cost a fortune. I totally recommend this to plussers.



    Michael Fisher—The Captives

    A well written thriller from the turn of the 70s, published in paperback here by the mighty New English Library. What if a scientist captures humans and experiments on them but doesn't and they fall in love and have orgies and then they reverse the imprisonment and paint patterns on each other and pretend to be bears. It's like a pencilface dark hippie swap CD. Good book, recommended.

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  • Mr Naga
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    Anybody on here use Goodreads?

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  • Sonovox
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    Those books are the 70s incarnation of New Worlds, what they migrated to after the original magazine folded. Looks like plenty of experimental stuff from the usual suspects - Ballard, Sladek, Disch, Moorcock etc etc. Never seen any of em before!

    I like Harlan Ellison, wildly variable and hyperbolic in style, but when he hits it he hits it! Most pleased with the copy of Pavane, been after that forever and a half.

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  • Tsundoku
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    Wow. Those New Worlds are quite a find. Presumably they are collections of experimental SF from the magazine that Moorcock used to do. I'd be interested to hear how good they are, and how avant garde. I've read quite a bit of the Jerry Cornelius stuff that (I think) was first published here quite odd I would imagine. I have the Ellison "Deathbird Stories" - it's an amazing book.

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  • Sonovox
    replied
    Despite years of pounding the second hand SF paperback beat, I pulled a fair wodge from Oxfams vintage SF 2-for-a-pound table today to add to the reading queue...


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  • giantchicken
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    Oddly enough, the only badger I ever saw in the wild was being enthusiastically pursued across a farmers field by a Jack Russell terrier who in turn was being pursued by a couple of kids who lived on the next street from me. Although only about 12 at the time I recall then chasing those lads to tell them that unless they called their dog off, the badger would surely break it's neck, for even at that tender age, I had heard of the fearsome fighting reputation of Brer Brock...the whole scene must have seemed quite a procession....Of course, both badger and terrier left us panting in their wake and I never did learn the outcome.

    You have a 'miniature dachshund', Ginghamkitchen? Is that like an even smaller version of an already fairly small dog? By Babycart's logic wouldn't that be a Chipolata Hound, or in German, 'eine wurstchenhund'?

    Anyway, the badger incident I witnessed was on the outskirts of Sheffield, so there's hope for you yet - the thing that surprised me most was that the badger was more brown and white than black and white....

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  • ginghamkitchen
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    A standard dachshund will dig into a sett and kill the occupants dead in double quick time. I don't condone it, but it's a documented fact. I have a miniature dachshund, so he might struggle, especially as he's a right Mummy's boy. I suppose you'd call him a cocktail sausage with your stone age 'call something what it looks like' naming practices.

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  • babycart
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    Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
    He's a Badger Hound. Dachshund. He looks like a sausage, though, I'll give you that. What do you call your car, the metal box fast go go?
    these days I call it a heap of shit, mostly. "Fast" certainly doesn´t come into it, and "go" is by no means guaranteed, either.
    I always try and use the German word for hovercraft, though. it´s Luftkissenfahrzeug, which means "air cushion go thing".

    I don´t believe sausage dogs were ever used for badgers, It´s like setting a hamster after a wolverine.

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