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Of late I have mostly been reading...

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  • #31
    Originally posted by mendoza View Post
    The Sheffield / Manchester bit defintley fell into this category. I liked the bit about Scousers and Pink Floyd (& Love) but that's intersted me since i lived there in the early 90's. Never knew Chatham in Kent was that rough but have checked this with a mate who confirmed his take on it.
    Yes, I agree - he seems like he wanted to write a book about Cornish folk music (via one of the bands he put out on his label), then included someone esle who he put out and tried to justify it further. I thought he could have made a lot more of the Sheffield noise bits. He does visit Dulcimer in Manchester though, home to b-Music.

    I thought the Liverpool bit was terrible. Going to Liverpool and only talking to Ian McCulloch and Ian Brodie is a bit daft.
    Mixes, compilations and the like

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    • #32
      Originally posted by J.R View Post
      You don't need to be clever to read the Odyssey, you just need to be patient.
      I think you need to get past the very start and be prepared for endless repetition but its infinitely more than the seven Books about Odysseus' journey.

      As for translation, I'm a fan of EV Rieu's Penguin Classics prose translation. Its clear, simple and is the easiest one to follow the story. There are more elegant translations - the Robert Fagles is a brilliant modern verse translation - but the Penguin Classics is ideal if you don't already know the story well.
      Mixes, compilations and the like

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      • #33
        Originally posted by alanmck View Post
        dear oh dear, Son of Stan strikes again.

        whoever will be next?

        I wish people would stop showing more than a modicum of intellect, together with a well rounded knowledge, on this forum. It's bloody annoying and leads to just this kind of disrespectful misunderstanding. Son of Stan - you are my Ζεύς.
        "Ridicule is nothing to be scared of"

        www.myspace.com/illustratedlondonnoise*********illustratedlondonnoise.blogspot.com

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        • #34
          Originally posted by alanmck View Post
          http://www.collectorsfrenzy.com

          research for the purpose of pruning.
          Is this as good as Popsike? I note there is a iphone ap for it
          "Ridicule is nothing to be scared of"

          www.myspace.com/illustratedlondonnoise*********illustratedlondonnoise.blogspot.com

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          • #35
            Originally posted by pitch View Post
            Is this as good as Popsike? I note there is a iphone ap for it
            More immediate, more up-to-date, less archived auctions, pretty US-centric.

            Use them both! And the iphone app works very well...

            I've been re-reading the works of Michael Innes, after having a great stack of green Penguins returned after a long-term loan.

            So far read three (The Daffodil Affair, Operation Pax, The Secret Vanguard) - very entertaining in a kind of John Buchan/Oxford don sort of way...
            We know when a mate buys it for you too.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by babycart View Post
              I like Dust, too, although it loses its way in the jungle at the end. I think Decline and Fall is his other really good book, and as relevant as ever today now that we're all about to be screwed over by the Bollinger Club.

              Brideshead, Scoop, Black Mischief and the first of the war trilogy did nothing for me, though. I blame conversion to catholicism, which more or less did for Greene and Chesterton too.
              Heresy!
              Even though I relish the stories about the great man's character, I profoundly dislike his early work for precisely that very reason- he was a thoroughly objectionable snob even then.
              I very much prefer his later writings once he had reinvented himself as crochety ultramontane, and 'Brideshead Revisited' for its uncharacteristic (for Waugh) mood of Verklärung.

              Reading Gregor von Rezzori's 'Memoirs of an Anti-Semite' at the moment.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by radtradCat View Post
                Reading Gregor von Rezzori's 'Memoirs of an Anti-Semite' at the moment.
                Odd how many of his worries and observations from then are appropriate today

                I want to live in Mahrebinia
                new SPOKE release: >>> SEE HERE <<< RKM LIBRARY BEATS

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                • #38
                  Been slumming it, reading-wise, recently: 'Regan and the Lebanese Shipment' (Joe Balham, 1977) & 'The Miniatures Frame' (Kenneth Royce, 1977).

                  Two great slabs of pulp fiction, the former a - you guessed it - spin-off from 'The Sweeney', the latter from the equally superb Granada Television series 'The XYY Man'.
                  A leaping rocker with a strong mood, a moderate beat and a safari feel.

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                  • #39
                    Are people familiar with this site?

                    Been using it for the last six months and it`s great

                    http://www.readitswapit.co.uk/TheLibrary.aspx
                    "I`m not saying that i think guitars are better than women, but i don`t know too many guys who fell out of love with their guitar" - Les Paul

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Teessider View Post
                      Are people familiar with this site?

                      Been using it for the last six months and it`s great

                      http://www.readitswapit.co.uk/TheLibrary.aspx
                      I tried it for a bit but it seems like it's just full of gumph and anything worth having involved endless emails and rejection.
                      http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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                      • #41
                        We've got some of these in Bristol which are pretty good....



                        We know when a mate buys it for you too.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by john stapleton View Post
                          We've got some of these in Bristol which are pretty good....



                          Unfortunately, the library pictured is in America which is a bit of a trek for a two week loan...
                          SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Mr Naga View Post
                            I tried it for a bit but it seems like it's just full of gumph and anything worth having involved endless emails and rejection.
                            Nah, it`s piss easy. Find something you want (Over 300,000 books so shouldn`t be too hard). Press a button and they get sent your list of books to either say yes or no to. If it`s yes you automatically get their address to post your book to. If it`s no you don`t. Don`t see how you can get endless e-mails.
                            "I`m not saying that i think guitars are better than women, but i don`t know too many guys who fell out of love with their guitar" - Les Paul

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                            • #44
                              Just read "Fat Bloke Thin Book" by Arturo Bassick. It's about the life and times of Arturo Bassick in the music industry. If you have no idea who Arturo is, he is/was a member of the Lurkers, Blubbery Hellbellies, Pinpoint and 999. A musician/punk who has been around since day one this tells you the story "of his life of total glamour and untold riches in the entertainment industry". Very funny in parts and well worth a read.

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                              • #45


                                Expury70s swap Cd made me dig these two out, both of which are recollections of Drum magazine, which operated in 50s Sophiatown before it was bulldozed and its residents moved forcibly to Soweto.

                                they're both great, full of music and low life, but also expose the daily grind and injustice of apartheid. Tommy Steele is also exposed as an arsehole who got around a regulation requiring performers to perform for a black audience by charging them a huge amount of money. Alma Cogan also didn't like performing for blacks. Tony Scott, on the other hand, comes over as agreat bloke.
                                Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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