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  • #61
    The reviews of the Dave Eggers novel of Wild Things have been poor. But his first novel/memoir is truly great and should be read.

    The film of Wild Things I actually liked. But if you think of it as a film of the book then you won't be pleased. They are two very separate things; Sendak was closely involved with the film.

    Recently seen the Gruffalo (TV and on stage) and the Snowman (stage production, heavy on the ballet). All expanded versions of what are originally very small, short stories. Wild Things I reckon was the most imaginative use of the source material.

    There is an animated version of Wild Things; Czech I think and dates from the 70s. Good, but a very literal transition.
    Last edited by piglit'n'rolf; 02-02-2010, 11:02 PM. Reason: poor sentence construction

    At first I bought records, then I started to collect records; now I merely accumulate records.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by piglit'n'rolf View Post
      But his first novel/memoir is truly great and should be read.
      Absolutely. The po-mo stylings are much less irritating than might be expected.
      Mixes, compilations and the like

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      • #63
        with "Heartbreaking work..." make sure you read from the very first word. Some hilarious stuff buried in the small print pages.

        At first I bought records, then I started to collect records; now I merely accumulate records.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by piglit'n'rolf View Post
          with "Heartbreaking work..." make sure you read from the very first word. Some hilarious stuff buried in the small print pages.
          His pirate supplies shop in San Francisco is pretty hilarious too
          MUSHRUMPS Daily party-prog MP3 blog

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          • #65
            I like Colin McInnes' Absolute Beginners and, especially, City of Spades, so when I saw Sweet Saturday Night, a book by him about music hall, I bought it.

            It's pretty good and covers 80 years of British popular music in a necessarily concise manner, although McInnes stresses that he's no expert. What is surprising is the amount of songs that you still recognise today.

            Something else that occurred to me is that music hall was, by and large, a London phenomena, and a strong whiff of it seems to linger on in London-based acts

            The Kinks, Ian Dury, Madness, Blur, even Lily Allen all came from London and all do bittersweet or humourous slice-of-life lyrics set to jaunty tunes, a bit saucy, a bit sentimental. Dury, especially, seems to be pure Dan Leno-style music hall. I can't really think of too many bands from the provinces with the same attitude.
            Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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            • #66
              Originally posted by MPFlapp View Post
              This is a classic - I gave up counting how many second hand guitars they bought...
              I found it really annoying. It conveyed the tedium of being on tour by being really tedious. But badly written and dull. Bruce Thomas' "The Big Wheel" is much better.
              Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

              John Peel

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              • #67
                Originally posted by babycart View Post
                The Kinks, Ian Dury, Madness, Blur, even Lily Allen all came from London.
                Can I be the first to point out the factual incorrectness of this statement.

                With geography skills like that, you'll be telling me Birmingham isn't in the north next.
                To infinity - and beyond!

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                • #68
                  It's been a busy week this last week

                  Polished off Peter Hook's "The Hacienda: How Not To Run A Club" which was bought with Birthday Tokens but wasn't worth the price paid - the Record Collector review tells you all you need to know.

                  Quickly finished Robert Harris's "Fatherland" after being drawn in with the sub title of "What if Hitler had won?" and also being particular to a bit of German war fiction.

                  And on the train this morning I have just started Peter Lehman's "Roy Orbison: The Invention of an Alternative Rock Masculinity" which was been on my wants list for a while.

                  I need to chase Waterstones as well for my Rick Rubin book's.

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by jakartajive View Post
                    Can I be the first to point out the factual incorrectness of this statement.

                    .
                    Which ones aren't eel noshers then?
                    Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                    • #70
                      Just had to give up on Vonnegut's 'Galapagos' which was failing to hold my interest. Shame as I love Slaughterhouse 5, Bluebeard and Breakfast
                      of Champions - think my brain has broken down in the cold.
                      http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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                      • #71
                        1984
                        Time to say peace...

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                        • #72
                          "Just had to give up on Vonnegut's 'Galapagos' which was failing to hold my interest. Shame as I love Slaughterhouse 5, Bluebeard and Breakfast
                          of Champions - think my brain has broken down in the cold."
                          Really? I thought that that was one of his best - although I guess it does take a little while to get going and to reveal what's going on - and has some of his most interesting ideas in it.

                          "At the moment MWQ is on my list of books I realise I will never get round to (see also Clarissa) but if I really enjoy Young Torless I might revise that."
                          I quite enjoyed Young Torless but not enough to embark on the doorstop. Next for me is The Late Mattia Pascal by Pirandello or possibly a biography of Monte Hellman which promises to be really good.

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Filthy Rich View Post
                            Really? I thought that that was one of his best - although I guess it does take a little while to get going and to reveal what's going on - and has some of his most interesting ideas in it.
                            Sometimes I find his stuff is a bit hard-going to start off with and I'm probably not giving it a fair chance - I'm going to read a couple of ladybird books and work up to it again at some point.
                            http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Mr Naga View Post
                              Sometimes I find his stuff is a bit hard-going to start off with and I'm probably not giving it a fair chance - I'm going to read a couple of ladybird books and work up to it again at some point.
                              I agree with Rich, Galapagos is brilliant. Does take a while to get going though.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by babycart View Post
                                Which ones aren't eel noshers then?
                                Blur are from Colchester in Essex, as am I. We don't have a big music hall tradition there.
                                SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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