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  • #76
    Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
    Blur are from Colchester in Essex, as am I. We don't have a big music hall tradition there.
    Pop goes my theory then.

    McInnes tells this story, which I liked:

    Lloyd's songs, although perfectly harmless by modern standards, began to gain a reputation for being "racy" and filled with double entendre, ("She'd never had her ticket punched before" for example) largely thanks to the manner in which she sang them, adding winks and gestures, and creating a conspiratorial relationship with her audience. She became the target of Vigilance or "Watch" committees and others opposing music-hall licenses. She liked to claim that any immorality was in the minds of the complainants, and in front of these groups would sing her songs "straight" to show their supposed innocence. In one famous incident, she was summoned before one of these committees and asked to sing her songs. She sang "Oh! Mr Porter"; and "A Little of What you Fancy" in such a sweet innocent way that the committee had no reason to find anything amiss. She then rendered the drawing-room ballad "Come into the Garden Maud" in such an obscene way that the committee was shocked into silence. She did herself no favours.
    Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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    • #77
      Just round the corner from me

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      • #78
        And, totally unrelated, but still kind of cool, my friend lives in this house

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        • #79
          I'm struggling through a Sonic Youth biography. It's not bad but they're not exactly the most rock n' roll for Danny Sugarman style excess stories. Most interesting bit so far (300 pages in) is they got paid a (low) seven figure amount for doing Loolapalooza in 1995. A million dollars!? Sonic Youth? Madness.

          I think I need a new book...
          http://www.matpringle.co.uk

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          • #80
            Derek Raymond - How The Dead Live. Picked up a copy after a reccomendation here on the board. Excellent stuff, that nameless narrator is a great character and he always has something offensive to say.

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            • #81
              I've been reading David Kynaston's books about Britain: Austerity Britain (2007) and Family Britain, just out - I believe his ultimate plan is to cover our post-war history up to the present day. They're excellent, full of surprising detail.

              Why is it that you start getting more and more interested in history as you get older? Is it a counterbalance to death awareness syndrome?
              SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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              • #82
                Currently re-reading:



                Apparently ghost-written by an NME journalist and factually questionable, but still fun.

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                • #83
                  Re-reading Parade's End by Ford Madox Ford. Perhaps not the best novel in English of the last century, but I'd argue for it as the best novel by an Englishman.
                  Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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                  • #84
                    Been enjoying a few record related reads of late-

                    Vinyl Junkies by Brett Milano

                    The Long Player Goodbye by Travis Elborough

                    The Fallen- Searching for Missing Members of the Fall by Dave Simpson

                    Have thoroughly enjoyed each of these- I have to go and do some work now, maybe say a bit more about them later. All highly recommendable though

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                      I've been reading David Kynaston's books about Britain: Austerity Britain (2007) and Family Britain, just out - I believe his ultimate plan is to cover our post-war history up to the present day. They're excellent, full of surprising detail.

                      Why is it that you start getting more and more interested in history as you get older? Is it a counterbalance to death awareness syndrome?

                      Maybe it's because you stop focusing on what is immediately around you, the contemporary, as it becomes less targeted at you, and you start wondering more about where you've come from. Related to having kids maybe?

                      Last book finished - A Fighter's Heart by Sam Sheldon. Very literate and thoughtful account of the author's training in various different (hard i.e. mostly full contact) martial arts around the world. Fascinating stuff - includes an eye-opening final chapter on dog-fighting!).

                      Otherwise, been wading into the ocean of Indology reading again, starting with the wonderful David Kinsley.
                      "As technology has advanced, vinyl records are outdated as they are music from the 19th Century so only hipsters and elderly people buy vinyl records".

                      Mixes for your delectation: http://www.mixcloud.com/danmatic/

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                        I've been reading David Kynaston's books about Britain: Austerity Britain (2007) and Family Britain, just out - I believe his ultimate plan is to cover our post-war history up to the present day. They're excellent, full of surprising detail.
                        I really enjoyed "Austerity Britain" which I read a while ago. Picked up "Family Britain" the other week and that's next in the pile.

                        Just finishing off this, which is in similar vein and a very absorbing read:

                        http://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Heat-H.../dp/0316724521

                        Also enjoyed this recently:

                        http://www.amazon.co.uk/Operation-Mi.../dp/0747598681

                        (Why is it that I find myself getting more interested in the Second World War as I get older...?)
                        Endless Tripe

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                          Blur are from Colchester in Essex, as am I. We don't have a big music hall tradition there.
                          Two ample Edwardian (ex-) variety theatres within a few hundred yards of each other? In a town, then, as now, full of squaddies? I bet there was a bit of it about.....
                          Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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                          • #88
                            Rip it up and start again (Simon Reynolds)
                            Excellent post-punk primer
                            http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rip-Up-Start.../dp/0571215696

                            American Gods - Author's preferred text (Neil Gaiman)
                            Neatly plotted, interesting, deep and engaging modern day fantasy novel
                            http://www.amazon.com/American-Gods-.../dp/0380789035

                            Adventures on the wheels of steel (Dave Haslam)
                            Enjoyable, entertaining and knowledgeable history of the UK clubbing and DJ circuit
                            http://www.amazon.co.uk/Adventures-W.../dp/1841154326

                            a certain Mr Votel makes a legendary guest appearance in the last title
                            http://www.blaxploitation.com
                            Chops for show, groove for dough.

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                            • #89


                              Mendacious sweeps, footpads, filthy London rookeries full of low-life, con artists, shoe thieves, pickpockets, cracksmen, bent coppers, mountains of horseshit two-stories high...

                              It's brilliant.

                              I also read some of Kate Atkinson's recent crime books, which are great fun, and a couple by Frances Fyfield, who's a bloody excellent writer.
                              Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                              • #90
                                Originally posted by d7bohs View Post
                                Two ample Edwardian (ex-) variety theatres within a few hundred yards of each other? In a town, then, as now, full of squaddies? I bet there was a bit of it about.....
                                Well, it passed me by. But I did notice a local tendency to Mockney which, I think, is more like it. You know your Essex towns, my friend.
                                SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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