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  • #16
    Treated the sheds with preservative stuff yesterday and today. Never done that in December before.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Little Jimmy Oddman View Post
      Curlews are waders so they are normally on the coast but I've seen them way land in the Dales on flooded farmland so it was probably drawn into Leeds by the floods I guess. From the air a lot of the city would have looked like a river delta.
      Curlews can breed inland, including on moorland. We get loads round here in springtime - house across the way is called "Curlew's Rest" - always lovely to hear their calls.

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      • #18
        Sonovox - excellent curlew knowledge. Yes, seen them up in the Dales. Amazing looking creatures.
        Mixes, compilations and the like

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        • #19
          Couple of hellebores out now. Also Rosa Bonica flowering, and snowdrops. As Treeboy says-" (tugs forelock) 'tain't roight sir, 'tain't roight I tell you". I'm sitting here in shirtsleeves for God's sake. I should be saying to Mrs Khan, "It's Christmas, shall we just turn the heating up a notch".
          I'm hoping Relkeel's injured curlew was rescued by someone. I cannot hear the word Curlew without thinking of the beautiful,haunting, piece by the barking mad Peter Warlock.

          "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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          • #20
            Melianthus Major, if it can survive until November, might flower in our garden- but it usually gets killed off before it can. Here it is flowering yesterday.

            "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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            • #21
              WHAT? I take it you didn't get that frost yesterday then? Hellebores have been out for a while here. Some of the early snowdrops are threatening to flower imminently. I've got Cerinthe major "purpurascens" over a foot high in the front garden. Months too early. No purple bracts on them yet, but even so. Probably end up getting hammered. Do you have these SK? I get loads of seed off them every year.
              Bring on the VG+ seed swap
              Everyone tear down your own little wall
              That keeps you from being a part of it all
              Because you've got to be one with the one and all
              You've just got to be close to it all

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              • #22
                Originally posted by treeboy View Post
                WHAT? I take it you didn't get that frost yesterday then? Hellebores have been out for a while here. Some of the early snowdrops are threatening to flower imminently. I've got Cerinthe major "purpurascens" over a foot high in the front garden. Months too early. No purple bracts on them yet, but even so. Probably end up getting hammered. Do you have these SK? I get loads of seed off them every year.
                Bring on the VG+ seed swap
                Frost? What frost? Yes, we have the Cerinthe- once planted never lost- but they aren't doing anything just yet. Some things which grow easily elsewhere just don't get on at all here. For instance we just cannot grow Verbena Bonariensis even though we are in the driest part of the country. It's a mystery. It should be perfect for them but they just don't grow. I grew a bunch of Paulownias from seed. I planted about 5 in different parts of the garden and gave one to my mum in Essex. Five years later hers is about 10ft high (cut down each year, natch) whereas all mine dwindled and died, never attaining more than two feet. We have better luck with tender shrubs. though. Acers though-no way; but who needs acers when you can have Cornus, or Euonymous, or Picrasma. To be honest I'd like some acers but it's pointless. We have three- two dissectums which have done surprisingly well, and a lovely Shishigashira but others have snuffed it and I won't plant any more. Parrotia persica is the star of our garden in autumn; that and Liquidambar 'Worplesdon.
                "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                • #23
                  Love Parrotia. Had to cut one down once. Certainly lives up to its (common) name. So you just grow the Paulownia for foliage? I'd have to let it flower if I had one. We've got a Cornus kousa,, but it doesn't like us. Really flags in the summer, so it's probably a combination of me frying it in the sun, and its toes not liking our soil. I'm in Essex too, and at the moment my garden is really soggy. Come the summer and its cracking wide open.
                  Everyone tear down your own little wall
                  That keeps you from being a part of it all
                  Because you've got to be one with the one and all
                  You've just got to be close to it all

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by treeboy View Post
                    Love Parrotia. Had to cut one down once. Certainly lives up to its (common) name. So you just grow the Paulownia for foliage? I'd have to let it flower if I had one. We've got a Cornus kousa,, but it doesn't like us. Really flags in the summer, so it's probably a combination of me frying it in the sun, and its toes not liking our soil. I'm in Essex too, and at the moment my garden is really soggy. Come the summer and its cracking wide open.
                    Well I'd like to grow the Paulownia for foliage if the bloody things would grow! Our Cornus Kousa is not great either but the 'Satomi' version does really well. Are you near Hyde Hall? It's terribly dry around there isn't it. Our garden was, formerly, a sandpit which is great for winter drainage but a bugger in the summer. It doesn't crack open so much as turn to dust. That's a Myrtle behind the Melianthus, by the way.
                    "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                    • #25
                      So you can grow all that lovely stuff that Beth Chatto has in her arid garden. That's interesting. I'm right across in the West of Essex. Mostly heavy clay, really prone to shrinkage as soon as the sun pops it's head out from behind the clouds. I'm on the side of a shallow valley, so it's a bit gravelly when you get down deeper. I'd say, essentially, a soil which is slow to warm up (North facing back garden doesn't help), but bakes when it gets going. I'm not a big fan of watering things too much, so things have to tough it out to survive here. They're getting plenty of water at the moment though! Front garden faces South, and is really gravelly after about 4 inches. Lovely big old flints when you get digging. A plant which really loves the front is Bugglusoides purpurocaerulea, (might be Lithospermum now) has those intense vipers bugloss blue flowers. Bit of a thug if the truth is known, but that just tells me it's in the right place. Looks great with California poppies dazzling through it.
                      Everyone tear down your own little wall
                      That keeps you from being a part of it all
                      Because you've got to be one with the one and all
                      You've just got to be close to it all

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        We have/had that Lithospermum. Mrs SK saw it in a garden and was seduced by the blue. It was pretty much swamping a whole border but she still wanted to buy it. I made sure we put it somewhere it couldn't do much harm and that was the last we saw of it! Occasionally it rears it's head, but you have to look hard. I have an 'Umbrella plant' indoors, I've had it for about 30 years. It gets big and I cut it down and it grows again. This year I thought I'd get rid of it so, in summer, I put it outside in readiness to compost it at the end of summer. Here it is this morning making new growth and going great guns. We don't water either because we are on a meter (here when we came, once on you can't get off).
                        "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                        • #27
                          Carrying on from your Umbrella plant, some years back I rescued a money plant that had been discarded in some woods. I kept potting it on...it kept growing. I put it out in the garden every summer, and bring it back in for the winter. When I say "I bring it.." I actually mean me and my mate around the corner bring it in. We can't lift it any more it's got so big. I have to keep it on a little platform on wheels that I made, and we construct a ramp through the patio doors into the living room. It just about made it through this year. Everyone who comes in does a sharp intake of breath when they see it for the 1st time. Hope that goose is still laying those golden eggs, I'll be on my way up it at this rate
                          Keep thinking of the Room Of Roots in Gormenghast
                          Everyone tear down your own little wall
                          That keeps you from being a part of it all
                          Because you've got to be one with the one and all
                          You've just got to be close to it all

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                          • #28
                            Me and Mrs Amidar have built a herb garden this year mostly made up of those herbs you get in pots from supermarkets. Our rule has been they must be reduced but not dead. We've rescued the Veg patch we haven't been able to use for the last few years too. Lots of plants new and old are coming on alongside and excess of Yukkas as usual.

                            Anyway my 99p carboot Rhubarb plant I bought years ago is now huge but it's coming to the end of it's run for this year and I want to do something with it instead of giving it the MIL for one of her rank crumbles. I was thinking a jam or chutney using some of the strawberry crop too. NRR but anyone have any ideas that are non booze related? I love Rhubarb and the plant has been massive this year so loads of it.

                            Other gardening tales welcome, I'm a late bloomer to this gardening lark and through no fault of my own have been kind of forced into it but I've been enjoying it this year. Yet another thing alongside Country music that indicates I'm getting old!

                            Just rescued the suicidal sparrow from the Greenhouse, he/she must have got locked in there last night or crawled through one of the missing panes. Next door have had Blue Tits in their nesting box complete with inside camera and the Pigeon couple are back. Less good news is we seem to have a family of Magpies invading our patch, not a fan of the magpie.

                            https://twitter.com/blackcurrantmoo/...54282416644096
                            Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                            Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                            Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                            Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

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                            • #29
                              Not sure about rhubarb, but made some cherry vodka last summer with cherries from father-in-law's tree. Using various old bottles of vodka that were lying around in cupboards not being drunk, we managed to make about 2 1/2 litres. Super easy - just put the cherries in a jar, pour in the vodka, leave for 6 months. Even better, just realised that a third of it wasn't drunk or given away at Christmas, so have been enjoying it again this week.

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                              • #30
                                I don't drink anymore so it would be wasted on me unfortunately. I'm thinking a chutney/jam with maybe some vanilla pod or cheapskate essence to add a bit of a custard edge.

                                Originally posted by bongolia View Post
                                Not sure about rhubarb, but made some cherry vodka last summer with cherries from father-in-law's tree. Using various old bottles of vodka that were lying around in cupboards not being drunk, we managed to make about 2 1/2 litres. Super easy - just put the cherries in a jar, pour in the vodka, leave for 6 months. Even better, just realised that a third of it wasn't drunk or given away at Christmas, so have been enjoying it again this week.
                                Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                                Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                                Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                                Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

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