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Herman Melville in a sand dune

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  • Herman Melville in a sand dune

    I hope you'll excuse the plug but as a few people have enjoyed some things I've written recently, I thought some of you might like this - an article I've just had published about Herman Melville and Nathaniel Hawthorne, one windy November day in 1856, sitting in a sand dune in Southport, Lancashire, complaining, while they smoked a cigar.

    For fans of backwater seaside towns and literary greats feeling suicidal.

    http://therealstory.org/2017/06/08/a...y-jp-robinson/
    Mixes, compilations and the like

  • #2
    Well I'm glad you blew your own trumpet. I'm a fan of the slim pamphlet-as this would be if it were in print- and there really aren't enough around these days. I can see that little piece nicely printed up, with a little wood engraved frontispiece, and sewn into a cover of thick, sage green, Fabriano Murillo paper. Excellent work.
    "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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    • #3
      enjoyed that, thanks Jim.
      I'm a big fan of Melville and recently read Billy Budd again. I also studied Hawthorne's story Young Goodman Brown a couple of years ago, which is OG puritan folk horror and recommended to anyone who enjoyed that Witch film recently.
      Sand dunes are unnerving, too. Stay still, landscape!
      Vardy.....¬°¬°¬°PELIGRO!!!

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      • #4
        Thanks for reading it Shere Khan and babycart - I'm glad you liked it.

        As you could probably guess, my favourite thing I've read by either of them is Nathaniel Hawthorne's Passages from the English Notebooks, his diaries from the time. Loads of the detail is from there but they are a great read all round. They are full of the folk horror stuff he saw, and snidey asides about English culture.

        I've not read Billy Budd but I've just started rereading Moby-Dick at the moment. I also really enjoyed Melville's Redburn. Most of it is really an account of Melville's journey to Liverpool as a young man, in the guise of a novel. There's a whole chapter where he just describes a (real) old guidebook, and loads about sightseeing.
        Mixes, compilations and the like

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