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  • You Are the Teacher

    Shit's just got real. My wife has been marking her student's exams on the subject of car boot sales.

    She asked me "Is this right?"

    Student had written "At car bootsales you can buy old clothes, antiques, vinyls, CDs and sport equipment."

    Tick or cross? Pass or fail? YOU ARE THE TEACHER.
    Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

  • #2
    English exam? Let's accept that the term is becoming more common. Has it reached the stage of being accepted in formal writing? Seems unlikely.

    A cross from me.

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    • #3
      Vinyl records. Or what's wrong with just bloody 'records'? Vinyl is either an adjective or an uncountable /mass noun. Pay no heed to this stupid 'vinyls' plural bastardization!
      "THIS IS A FINE TAPE AND BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF YESTERYEAR WHEN THE MUSIC WORLD WAS GOOD AND NOT FOULED UP BY THE LONG HAIR SCURVES WHO JUST BEAT WILDLY ON ANYTHING AND COME UP WITH A LOT OF STUPID NOISE THat only damnfools and liars say they like it"

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      • #4
        I argued with one of my sons teenage friends a few years back and I ended up being made to feel wrong which still smarts. Will it become the accepted term as Lounge Cowboy alludes I agree it's unlikely so it's a spiteful cross from me with an extra Bah and harumphth for good measure.
        Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

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        • #5
          There used to be a fair few teachers (and the odd head teacher) on this site - where are they when they're needed eh?

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          • #6
            I teach a course called 'English for writers, editors and publishers', all about copy-editing.

            As babycart's question suggests, we are in the midst of language change.

            Until it is absolutely clear that the language use has changed unambiguously for everyone, we have to assess this on the basis of context.

            What is the context of the exam? If it is an English exam in Spain... I personally think 'vinyls' would be fine. Tick.

            If it is testing more formal English for publication in non-fiction/research then it's wrong, it should be 'vinyl records' or just 'records'.

            What do we see in journalism? That's usually a good barometer of change. I suspect 'vinyls' will be acceptable in some chatty pieces in broadsheets. If not now, then soon.

            I also don't think that this is a thing that people should get angry about. Nouns, verbs and adjectives change their meaning and appearance over time: that's what they do.

            Vinyl(s) is present as a term because it stresses the physicality of the recording format in a time when this is what people see as important.

            If the student had written 'At car bootsales you can buy old clothes, antique's, vinyl's, CD's and sport equipment.' then that would be a much more serious error. Big cross.

            Finally, I would question 'car bootsales' — 'car boot-sales' surely?
            Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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            • #7
              I'd go for car-boot sales if anything.

              A google trends search suggests the use of the word vinyls in searches has not increased significantly in recent years. In fact it's usage has tailed off. I think it's still a stand worth taking.



              Explore search interest for vinyls by time, location and popularity on Google Trends

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              • #8
                Originally posted by babycart View Post
                Shit's just got real. My wife has been marking her student's exams on the subject of car boot sales.

                She asked me "Is this right?"

                Student had written "At car bootsales you can buy old clothes, antiques, vinyls, CDs and sport equipment."

                Tick or cross? Pass or fail? YOU ARE THE TEACHER.
                Funnily enough it is quite common in Greek; we say "vinylia" or "diskoi" instead of records and it's perfectly acceptable. But in English it's wrong, isn't it? It's a cross from me as well.
                Everything in Greece is arpa kolla

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                • #9
                  This image is on my phone case so I can keep people in check at all times!

                  Click image for larger version

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Skip View Post

                    A google trends search suggests the use of the word vinyls in searches has not increased significantly in recent years. In fact it's usage has tailed off. I think it's still a stand worth taking.
                    That's pretty interesting. Australia leads, UK second, Europe seems to be strong on vinyls and the US is quite far down the list.
                    I like the way the searches peak at christmas in recent years.
                    You'd have to take streaming and d/ling into account to explain the high early results, I guess.

                    Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                    • #11
                      I like "vinylia". Shame it doesn't mean anything in English. 'Vinyl related paraphernalia', perhaps? Would anyone care to start that ball rolling?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by babycart View Post

                        Student had written "At car bootsales you can buy old clothes, antiques, vinyls, CDs and sport equipment."

                        Tick or cross? Pass or fail? YOU ARE THE TEACHER.
                        I would be inclined to point out the potential repercussions of not inserting an Oxford comma. Cross.

                        Click image for larger version

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                        • #13
                          Can you not buy styrenes at boot-sales, or shellacs?
                          "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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