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  • Do you flip?

    Label owners such as DJ Shepdog, the well-known London-based selector and collector behind soundsystem primed label Nice Up! “I collect records, I buy records and every now and again I do just buy certain things to flip,” says Shepdog, real name Jon. “Not often. But I have, in the past, got two copies of an album, sold one and got mine for free. Or I’d trade it for something else. I’ve sold things for way more than I bought them for, so I can’t be too preachy about this. But if you’re buying 10 or 20 copies just to flip when the price peaks? That’s the same as ticket touting.”

    Jon explains how he seldom buys doubles to flip or trade now, because they are less likely to increase in value due to the culture becoming so commonplace, and the bandwagon is starting to bulge. He also explains how he’s made a lot more from selling older records that have naturally gone up in value, like his old collection of hip-hop 45s, some of which he’s sold for five or six times the price he paid for them in the early 2000s. “I’d had my fun with the record, and was happy to let them go to someone who will continue to enjoy it, everyone wins,” says Shep. “If they wanted it when I bought it, they’d have paid less, too.”
    Reasonable article on a pretty widespread practice—https://djmag.com/content/discogs-sc...g-investigates

    Do you flip. Now and again, if I see the opportunity I will buy a double if I know the record is going to likely sell for more. Then I will sell it.

    This is offset, however by the amount of new records I buy that I don't buy doubles of. An anyway, most of them a) don't sound as good as the soundfiles did on my computer and b) no one wants anyway.

    Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

  • #2
    That's cute.

    I sell to buy and so on, further down the drain.

    I don't pick up new releases that often because I am usually too late for the party anyway and the cheapest option is usually hhv and I hate them with a passion so I rely on handmedowns from friends and I found it's usually a better strategy to wait for the hype to die down and pick up what's left.

    Personally I think that most hype records are already well known (played out) so by the time you get it, it's not that special really and you are just trying to copy whatever set you heard it on. Dropped @ Boiler Room is a running joke here.

    Second hand stuff I don't need gets the Discogs median pricetag unless I feel that the record should be worth a bit more based on gut feeling and weather.
    I wonder where the threshold is when a mark up is considered malicious. Double the RSVP?

    I've been following the secondary market on the collectable card game Magic the gathering for a while now (yeah I just said that) and that's another level of crazy. Kids with BitCoin wealth get to play stock market on a small scale but quite a lot of money involved. A post on reddit recently showed a 16 year old "investing" 100k in 18 or so cards (Dual lands iirc). There's insider trading, buyouts a lot of fun stuff but records are still miles from that away thankfully.

    All the Wolpertingers

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    • #3
      ive always sold, going to bootsales / charity shops id buy stuff that i knew i could sell, mainly to get money back from spending so much on records.
      its good selling all the stuff mounting up from 20 years ago for a lot more than i paid for them. to buy more, always
      instagram.com/vinylhoard

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      • #4
        Never a record dealer, I`ve long had a regular way of buying thrift/used records (including doubles) cheap enough to get some 'buffer money' so as to buy expensive never-to-be-found-in-the-wild records, thus being more lenient to the 'official' human employmemnt budget we are all used to sparing, A pretty common strategy I`d guess.
        DANCE TO THE RADIO

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        • #5
          there's a big difference between buying a second hand bargain to sell, and the "scalping" practice of buying new releases simply to sell on immediately to people who lost out on the 500 copies pressed (or whatever). I read that article the other day, and I think it mostly was about the latter practice. Really annoying when new releases are immediately sold out and listed up on Discogs by people who had no intention of actually listening to it.

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          • #6
            Yes, that's exactly what I'm really asking bongolia... with it so easy to sell records do you ever get tempted to game the market by getting a couple of a limited new issue?

            Although it seems the hot action is with Magic The Gathering these days...
            Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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            • #7
              No, I don't flip. I'm not much of a businessman. I think even if I bought something and didn't like it I'd find it difficult to turn it over for twice the price straight away. I know it's market forces and all that but I don't want to be part of those markets.
              "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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              • #8
                I've bought to sell in the past, only duplicates. And then never sold. Nothing too exciting but I should sort it all out... I don't think I've ever bought something purely to sell on as if I had no interest in it myself.

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                • #9
                  I think there's a distinct line between being "a junkie who deals a bit to fund their own addiction" and a proper "don't get high on your own supply" straight-up dealer. I think if you still have a passion for music, records and digging you'll inevitably dabble selling bits and bobs - the minute it's just about profit, well, you're a dealer. I had a chance to buy a spare Rendell-Carr box-set and it would've been a guaranteed easy £100 - but I pointed a mate in its direction and have had some good vinyl karma since!
                  Club stuff: www.facebook.com/DivineGlasgow

                  Mixes: https://www.mixcloud.com/andrewdivine/

                  Photos: www.instagram.com/divine_glasgow/

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                  • #10
                    I buy to sell to buy to sell to buy to sell to buy to sell.

                    I've occasionally flipped, but not often - prefer to acquire my Discogs merchandise second hand at car boot sales / record fairs / second hand vinyl emporiums. I'm unsure why, but I find a lot of 'new' record shops (e.g. Bristol Rough Trade, which has replaced Rise, which I liked) cold, antiseptic spaces, and hence I'm not really picking up much new stuff, or indeed new old reissue stuff.

                    I think my biggest ever flipping venture was buying 50 sealed copies of 'The Feedback' reissue from the label to punt on. I finally managed to sell most of them ... after 5 years Gambling on 'limited editions' is a bit of a risk, especially a full price - I'd much rather be taking 50p punts on interesting singles plucked from a sunny field. Thus one ends up with cheap unsaleable tat, instead of costly unsaleable tat. Or - heaven forbid - buys something one actually wanted in the first place, instead of buying you didn't want to acquire something you thought you did.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by eine View Post
                      Yes, that's exactly what I'm really asking bongolia... with it so easy to sell records do you ever get tempted to game the market by getting a couple of a limited new issue?

                      Although it seems the hot action is with Magic The Gathering these days...
                      If this is what`s behind the question, my answer is NO reissues (bought to be sold).
                      DANCE TO THE RADIO

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                      • #12
                        I don't flip in the sense that you mean Eine.

                        Who is more ethically/ morally compromised?

                        (a) Grim Lounge Cowboy who buys LPs for $1-2 from charity shops often selling them for 10 times that and, occasionally, for far more?

                        (b) Hypothetical Lounge Cowboy who buys LPs new to sell for a few extra $?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Grim Lounge Cowboy View Post
                          I don't flip in the sense that you mean Eine.

                          Who is more ethically/ morally compromised?

                          (a) Grim Lounge Cowboy who buys LPs for $1-2 from charity shops often selling them for 10 times that and, occasionally, for far more?

                          (b) Hypothetical Lounge Cowboy who buys LPs new to sell for a few extra $?
                          'a' is serendipitous, and 'b' is just cynical so I'm saying 'b'.
                          "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                          • #14
                            I'm guessing most collectors are in an ongoing circle of picking up items - some you want for your own collection, some a friend has been after, some are bargains worth more which you sell on at a profit of some kind to help fund future purchases. Mine are almost always a selective mix of charity shop finds, car boot buys, opportunistic eBay/Discogs items and the odd local auction. I don't buy much in the way of reissues, unless it's something I particularly want and where the original is eye-wateringly expensive.
                            Last edited by Mactheruss; 16-01-2019, 08:46 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Discog sales details are starting to show up now for Jazzman’s Rendell Carr boxset. 10 copies have been sold so far. Given the RRP was about £90 some flippers have made a killing on this one:
                              • £316.37 Average
                              • £308.89 Median
                              • £441.64 Highest
                              • £265.52 Lowest
                              very annoying as Phonica let me down badly and i’m now left with paying silly prices if i want it.

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