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  • Fragment of fear

    About 5 years ago I saw a copy of the Fragment of Fear soundtrack on a list, and stupidly I passed on it. To this day I've never even seen a copy of this record or heard it mentioned in "polite" conversation, and I'm starting to wonder if it actually exists...

    Can anyone shed any light on a full soundtrack (and I don't mean the Movements album) and if the other music on it is up there with the main theme and Stepping Stones?
    There MUST be a Hymns-A-Swingin' in this box...

  • #2
    i talked to JH's son a little about this several years ago and i think he said that johnny had only done a couple of tracks for the movie, not a whole album's worth of material.

    maybe you saw the 45 issue? there's a fragments of fear 45 with the theme and stepping stones on it. could be wrong though - maybe there is a full LP issued somewhere in the world (it's not in any of the major OST reference guides by the way)
    http://www.blaxploitation.com
    Chops for show, groove for dough.

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    • #3
      Hmmm, I was hoping you'd be the one with the answers...

      I'm sure it was a full length Fragment of Fear soundtrack album I was offered, not a 45. But, like you, I've never found any record of its existence. At the time i thought "the best tracks will be on Movements, I don't need the soundtrack" and am now thinking that was very foolish indeed...

      Anyone else with any more info?
      There MUST be a Hymns-A-Swingin' in this box...

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      • #4
        Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the situation was that JH wanted 'Movements' to be a 'Fragments Of Fear' soundtrack, but Warner insisted on it having a load of the cover versions he'd been doing on the Lulu TV show, with only a couple of original compositions.

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        • #5
          As far as I'm aware he wanted to do an album of original material but WB wanted him to cash in on the popularity of the arrangments he did on Lulu's show. Doing a couple of 'Fragments Of Fear' tracks was his way of getting some of his own compositions on the album. I've read about this a couple of times and I'm pretty sure he talks about it in the interview posted on Boogiejuice's Johnny Harris site.

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          • #6
            ok, here's some more info courtesy of Robert Farnon Society. the fragments of fear tracks were re-recorded for Movements - looks like there was a complete score written so maybe it was released somewhere? all the 45s of those tunes that i've heard are taken from Movements and are definitely not from a different recording.

            Robert Farnon Society original article

            The turning point in his career came in 1969 when his manager Daniel Secunda signed a deal with Warner Bros to record two albums, the first being the cleverly-titled "Movements" which is now considered by many to be a classic. There has been a lot of renewed interest in this album in recent years and Warners have now reissued the album on CD complete with bonus tracks. The album was preceded by a single, the hauntingly beautiful "Footprints On The Moon", which was Johnny's tribute to the Apollo moon landings. The single received a lot of radio airplay during the summer of 1969 and film director Richard Sarafian was suitably impressed and decided that he wanted Johnny to write the score for his new film, the psychological thriller "Fragment Of Fear". "The director said it was a movie about drug addicts and said that he wanted the music to be spikey" Johnny revealed, which led him to pen the hypnotic title theme and the fast and furious "Stepping Stones" which was used in a chase sequence. The score was recorded in London with a small 10-piece orchestra and a rhythm section including Mickey Gee on guitar, Herbie Flowers on bass, Harold Fisher on drums, Johnny Dean percussion with the addition of Roger Coulam on organ and Harold McNeil who played the distinctive screaming flute solos.

            The result was a highly original and strikingly beautiful score which Johnny thought was too good to remain hidden away and so decided to re-record some of the material for the album. To achieve the same sound he used the same musicians who had recorded the score plus a larger string section. Originally he had wanted to fill the album with his own compositions but Warners also wanted him to duplicate the type of stuff he had performed on the Lulu show where he famously rearranged pop hits of the day in his own unique style. So the set includes impressive arrangements of The Beatles' "Something", The DoorsÂ’ "Light My Fire" and The Rolling Stones' "Paint It Black". The latter is especially memorable as it features elements of "Night On A Bare Mountain" but each and every track is an audio delight combining elements of rock, jazz and classical resulting in a truly memorable musical melange. As well as the fine blend of pop and orchestrations and the distinctive arrangements, many of the tracks were linked with tiny flute motifs. "'We wanted to make it like a trip" Johnny said and revealed that the effect was created by getting engineer Bob Auger to play the tapes of Harold McNeil's flute pieces back-wards during the mixing which gave the whole album a very haunting, almost psychedelic feel.

            "Movements" received enthusiastic reviews and was a huge success in the UK and overseas and remained on WarnersÂ’ best sellers list for several years. However the public had to wait over three years until the next Harris solo album as he was busy on other projects. Eventually he found time to work on a worthy follow-up and the result was the enigmatic and energetic "All To Bring You Morning". Although not as memorable as the first album it contains blissfully delicate versions of John Lennon's "Imagine" and Leslie Duncan's "Love Song", plus one incredible suite (the title track) where over a 13-minute period Johnny takes the orchestra from a hard edged brass filled stomp to a beautiful finale of crying strings. During the sessions for the album Jon Anderson and Alan White from the rock group Yes got involved as they were in the studio next door and were fans of Johnny's work. As well as adding to the rhythm section they also provided vocals resulting in a nice mix of rock and orchestra.
            http://www.blaxploitation.com
            Chops for show, groove for dough.

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