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Pickin\' Up On The E String

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  • Rich Hero
    replied
    </span>
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]
    Rich, how can you compare Adam Yauch to Ron Carter??!
    <span =''>

    Dunno, I've always thought that MCA seems cool. Maybe he's not technically that gifted but I love the fact that the Beasties make use of an acoustic for one track then go for the fuzzy hardcore on the next. I just can't think of that many groups apart from jazzers make use of an upright and I love the sound of that instrument. (Oops, I'm forgetting Sneaky from Fingathing...). He doesn't get mired in the noodling that many great players indulged in (because he can't) and plays from a hip hop perspective, whereas so many of the great hip hop basslines come from disappointing tracks. Which is also the reason why Ron Carter get props for the Moondog Lp let alone anything else.

    'Ron Carter is on the bass...'

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  • Matt Hero
    replied
    or how can anybody suggest Pino Palladino..... Paul Young's 'No Parlez' anybody ? That bass sound makes my teeth grind. And not in that good way

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  • Nick Cope
    replied
    Just out of interest and a general lazy aversion to finding out for myself - Does Carol play on Detroit, the Paul Humphrey 45 on Lizard - as there's a version of the same composition on that 10&quot; ...

    and Rich, how can you compare Adam Yauch to Ron Carter??!

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  • Belson
    replied
    Time to add Henry Franklin to the list.

    Provider of bass to some of Ramseys more funkier sides as well as the killer open bass for Gene Russells 'Get Down' on 'Talk to my lady'.

    Whilst sticking with the Black Jazz theme, I think Cleveland Eaton should get an honorable mention.

    And I didn't see Donald 'Duck' Dunn on the list either. Ever wondered who created the bassline for 'Melting Pot'?. Booker T's backbone and played bass in the OG Blues Brothers film.

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  • theeman
    replied
    more bassists:

    jannick top
    chuck rainey
    that bloke out of the headhunters - paul jackson?

    oh, and King Thumb off Rockschool is Henry Thomas. he's still around on the London session scene - my drum teacher gigged with him recently and was saying he's one of the most solid 'in the pocket' players around. quite happy playing a simple groove but making it rock solid for a whole gig without mucking around - so many talented pro's can't resist showing off (anyone who's been to one of the dep gigs at Jazz Cafe will know what i mean!)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Noel Redding.
    If he's good enough for Jimi, he's good enough for me.
    And nobody's mentioned the late great John Entwhistle, either. Shame on you.
    Oh, and how could I forget Tab Martin?

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  • Rich Hero
    replied
    Leroy Sibbles
    Robbie Shakespeare
    Ron Carter
    Adam Yauch
    Tony Butler...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    What about Geezer Butler from Black Sabbath ?
    Or whatever the Bass player from Black Sabbath's name is.
    He was really good.

    I saw a 3 man hard rock band called WILD TURKEY open up for Sabbath in 1971 at Winterland, SF CA, that featured the Bassist for Jethro Tull and he was a freakin' monster.

    Saw Jaco with Weather Report also at Winterland when Heavy Weather came out. Al Dimeola was who I went to see and I think it was his 2nd LP, ELEGANT GYPSY just came out and Lenny White opened up the show.
    That was a really good show and well worth the
    &#365.50 for the ticket :-)

    YES, I AM VERY OLD !

    Jack

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  • wayne
    replied
    Have to put in props on the bass front for Kim Deal (Pixies, 'Cannonball') Tina Weymouth (Genius Of Love, Talking Heads), and the bloke from Queen whose name I don't know on just ONE of whose basslines (Another One Bites The Dust) Sugarhill built an empire! Just think: without the poodle-permed crap-anthem peddlers, no Kurtis Blow, Gradmaster Flash...

    Jah Wobble's had his moments, as well, if you like that sort of thing. And Ashley Hutchings on the early Fairport Convention LPs... Sly or Robbie, too (whichever one of them isn't drumming on all those classic Jamaican records). Can never remember which did what...





    (Edited by wayne at 7:30 pm on April 9, 2003)

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  • Raj Mann
    replied
    </span>
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Quote: from cell on 6:58 pm on April 9, 2003
    What about Herbie Flowers!  'Can I Kick It' wouldnt have rocked without him
    <span =''>

    Doh! It's always the obvious ones!

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  • cell
    replied
    What about Herbie Flowers!  'Can I Kick It' wouldnt have rocked without him

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  • Raj Mann
    replied
    </span>
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Quote: from Mumbles on 9:30 am on April 9, 2003
    His name escapes me (shame) but the bassist with Free was incredible.I think he was only 16 when they recorded 'All Right Now' and the way he plays the 4 string turns that tune around.Everyone knows that bassline.
    <span =''>

    Andy Fraser, what a tasteful bass playa!  All of Free were quite young, Paul Kossoff was barely out of his teens and was playing like a seasoned old blues man.

    Benicio, I only mentioned Pino because of something funny Manzo said about the influence of &quot;Wherever I Lay My Pissing Hat!&quot;  But you are right, he has done stirling work over the years, highlights for me being the last Terry Callier album, John McLaughlin's The Promise LP and the new Common LP (which I think is quite spiffing and very bass heavy).  But being a session muso, you do have to play the odd turkey in order to earn a crust.

    Talking of session musos, another British bass player who I think is very underated is Guy Pratt, last heard playing on the lurvly ducky Lemon Jelly single.

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  • Benicio Del Toffo
    replied
    Cheers for the info fellas.

    Raj, I actually considered Pino for his sterling work over the years (and for appearing on D'Angelo's 'Voodoo' LP), but I had my teens ruined by various people playing Paul Young's 'No Parlez' LP which is a Pino jamboree. I actually liked the fretless bass too, thanks to Mick Karn, but after hearing 'Wherever I Lay My Pissing Hat' constantly, one tires.

    Benicio

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  • Mumbles
    replied
    His name escapes me (shame) but the bassist with Free was incredible.I think he was only 16 when they recorded 'All Right Now' and the way he plays the 4 string turns that tune around.Everyone knows that bassline.

    In my jazz/rock days I would have rated Stanley Clarke at number one.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I just bought that on Cassette from her site a couple of weeks ago for like 7 bucks or something, less than 10 with shipping.

    The site will tell you everything I imagine and she answers her e-mails very quickly, so e-mail her.

    I think it's [email protected]

    Obviously the site is carolkaye.com

    I met her in Santa Monica about 2 years ago, when she was doing as live on the air interview for the Internet station I was doing my show at, which has been reincarnated, but is nowhere near the same station.
    Luxuria Music, so www.luxuriamusic.com

    I asked her a TON OF STUFF, which she answered without missing a beat.

    She, Tommy Tedesco-Guitars, Bud Shank-Flutes/Reeds,
    Larry Knechtal-Keyboards and Shelly Manne-Drums were THE BAND for sooooooooo many killer soundtracks, IT'S CRAZY !

    Like, &quot;Lady in Cement&quot; for instance. ROCKIN' !
    Get that soundtrack if you don't have it.

    Jack

    Leave a comment:

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