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  • Blighty
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (emperor tomato ketchup @ Mar. 12 2004,17:36)]now I want curry. Maybe we shoudl have a drooling Homer smilie. Surely that'd work for those records that get the juices flowing?
    I want the ability to talk. I spent so much time drinking, smoking and chatting last night that I've been a mute all day. So I guess I'm stuck in all evening working on my PC.

    Time for another honey, lemon and ginger I guess. Woo hoo!! Party.

    Leave a comment:


  • emperor tomato ketchup
    replied
    Which Gentle Giant album - I have the third on which is fun - starts with Ode to Panurge or something like that and then has a silly song about troubadours.

    I know people who are primarily techno heads and so are inclined to trust the Holmes logo when they want some retro funk sounds as they've liked his techno stuff.

    I'm currently playing Nursw With Wound's Spiral Insana and when it finishes I'm logging off and going home for the weekend before I start putting more stupid bids on ebay auctions for scary guitar albums (Randy Holden's Population 2 in this case).

    Leave a comment:


  • ladyboygrimsby
    replied
    Mmm. Well, I thought Gritty Shaker was ace. I also hadn't heard the Edgar Broughton Band tune before I heard his mixes. Was it a bootleg? I don't know. I don't care. I liked it and went out and bought it.

    He's a bit of moody git compared to what he used to be like before he started hanging out with George Clooney and Barbara Stanwyck and Audrey Hepburn, though. I knew you before you were famous, pal!

    PS Just listening to Gentle Giant. Bonkers.

    Leave a comment:


  • emperor tomato ketchup
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Blighty @ Mar. 12 2004,17:11)]I don't think his ability as a DJ is an issue. Obviously there are 'better' DJs (whatever that means) but the fact is that people love what he does. That's why he fills clubs and sells huge amounts of mix CDs. That's why he makes big money. Not because he's the worlds greatest DJ
    There's plenty of people with less time to spend on checking out stuff and so for them he's a mark of quality i.e. not the best but a guarantee of a certain standard. I've friends who if they probably thought about it for 2 seconds would realise he isn't the best funk DJ but he's easy to find. There's only so many hours in the day. Probably forthe same reason I still eat in the thai restaurant across the road even though I know its crap and overpriced comapred to thailand.



    now I want curry. Maybe we shoudl have a drooling Homer smilie. Surely that'd work for those records that get the juices flowing?

    Leave a comment:


  • Blighty
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (emperor tomato ketchup @ Mar. 12 2004,16:52)]I've often heard that he started out more as a northern soul/mod type DJ back in the dark ages before techno.
    Yeah apparently that Johnny Jones track that he comped and sampled to fuck a while back had been in his collection since he was 14. From what I've read he went with the techno thing for a while because he loved it but eventually got bored and went with something that meant more to him.

    I don't think his ability as a DJ is an issue. Obviously there are 'better' DJs (whatever that means) but the fact is that people love what he does. That's why he fills clubs and sells huge amounts of mix CDs. That's why he makes big money. Not because he's the worlds greatest DJ

    As for his ability in the studio, as far as I can see he always gives plenty of credit to those people he works with. Based on interviews I've read he seems to be the sort of person that goes into the studio with a lot of ideas/records/etc but doesn't necessarily know how to work all the equipment and put the tracks together. I don't see anything wrong with that. As long as he's not taking credit for other peoples work.

    The fact is the guy has money/fame/etc because he's spent years working hard and taking risks. He's met the right people, had a few 'lucky' breaks, got a good manager and created a bit of an image for himself. Anyone here who believes they are better than him can go for the same or a similar market and see if they can get what he has. I'm guessing most people don't want to otherwise they would.

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  • emperor tomato ketchup
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (bongolia @ Mar. 12 2004,15:40)]he had a 'head start' from being a respected techno dj before his conversion to this sort of music. so he already had a foot in the door on getting big bookings and radio shows presumably - and he was still featured in dance mags after he stopped playing techno
    I've often heard that he started out more as a northern soul/mod type DJ back in the dark ages before techno.

    Some of his techno-y records are pretty good. I certainly lacked he nutters he sampled in New York. And I'm happy enough that the funk type comps he's done get played by my mates when i go round instead of Dasultimatefacelesstechnobollocks Volume 117.

    Leave a comment:


  • emperor tomato ketchup
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Blighty @ Mar. 12 2004,15:44)]How can someone with such appreciation of quality music make such average music?
    Appreciating it and making it are two very different things.

    I've known musicians who do great stuff but not only like crap music often only listen to a small amount of stuff and have tiny collections of records. (cue horde of flaky musician stories). But that may apply more to instrumentalists than guys like Holmes who do collage/sample stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • wayne
    replied
    Ok, deep breath, I'm going in...

    I quite like some of Holmes' stuff: The Free Association LP was patchy, but no more derivative than 99% of the whole new funk scene...I can see the promotion of that instead of other outfits would rankle, but surely that's true of everything out there.

    As for his comps/mixes, well, can't say I'm a fan of mixes anyway (leave the little pause between tracks, or at least let 'em start and finish as their makers intended) but as choice of tracks go, I'd guess they're aimed at the kind of buyer who's more usually go for a crappy chill-out or chart hits CD than those who dig up new stuff.

    Guess somebody has to bridge the gap between the underground & popular audience, and seen that way he does a reasonable enough job: better than some, certainly no worse than others... As for 'marketing, contacts' etc, well THAT applies to everyone, whether Gilles Peterson or just someone who happened to know the right dealers 5 or 15 years back, so maybe a tad unfair to single Holmes out for being what everyone else is, just higher profile with it.

    I'm guessing he's one of those who people will get into, go beyond, then feel a bit snooty about: like much of the output of the late 80s Acid Jazz boom, or Big Beat, or whatever. Thety turn people onto it, they get left behind. For which indignity they are consoled with fat paydays. Be nice to see popular taste coincide with the best people & music, but we'll be waiting a good while yet...

    Leave a comment:


  • Belson
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (vibra @ Mar. 12 2004,16:06)]Surely that's a bit irrelevant Greg. As the artists and tracks are credited on the shows, if they are registered with the appropriate collecting societies they should still recieve royalties from the play and performance of their music, regardless of origin of the source - I can't understand why they would be unhappy about their music getting played.
    Oh sure they'll probably get the PRS for the radio shows. But it's the spin off compilations that sold 000,s I wonder about. If they're white labels, how on earth did any of those tracks get cleared? That's not to say they didn't, but it would have taken someone a hell of a lot of work.

    Anyways.......beer time and disco jockeying. Huzzah!

    Leave a comment:


  • left hand corner
    replied
    Easy Tiger!

    My original post was about Mr Cherrystones. It's all getting a bit Deepfunk/SoulStrut. Come on, it's Friday afternoon.

    Leave a comment:


  • vibra
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (Belson @ Mar. 12 2004,14:32)]I care very much on this one. He put together 2 Essential Mixes using at least 50% bootlegs. I wonder if any of the artists know anything about that whatsoever.
    Surely that's a bit irrelevant Greg. As the artists and tracks are credited on the shows, if they are registered with the appropriate collecting societies they should still recieve royalties from the play and performance of their music, regardless of origin of the source - I can't understand why they would be unhappy about their music getting played.

    Leave a comment:


  • Belson
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (emperor tomato ketchup @ Mar. 12 2004,15:19)]I dunno - but some of the anti-Holmes feeling might be based on the "I could be doing that so how come he's up to his neck in groupies, cash and free drugs?" factor.

    Answers: luck, marketing savvy, contacts?
    Too right.

    Virtually all the people I've met on this board could do a far better job than Mr. Holmes. Certainly regarding DJing sets. I reckon a few of us would be better than him in the studio too. And considering the quality of engineer he always takes into othe studio with him, I question his talent there also.

    There's no way this fella should be representative of anything of what he does. And there he is winning awards for it and getting paid top dollar.

    You've smacked the bottle top head on Mr. Ketchup

    Leave a comment:


  • Blighty
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] ]Personally, I'm totally jealous. But not of his soundtracks.


    I have to say that 99% of the music he makes is pretty crap. The only thing he's done that I like was that freebie seven inch that came with Jockety Slut many years ago. Although I do love the idea of him and his mates wandering around New York on acid recording people. Shame about that album.

    How can someone with such appreciation of quality music make such average music?

    Leave a comment:


  • bongolia
    replied
    Originally posted by [b
    Quote[/b] (emperor tomato ketchup @ Mar. 12 2004,15:19)]I dunno - but some of the anti-Holmes feeling might be based on the "I could be doing that so how come he's up to his neck in groupies, cash and free drugs?" factor.

    Answers: luck, marketing savvy, contacts?
    he had a 'head start' from being a respected techno dj before his conversion to this sort of music. so he already had a foot in the door on getting big bookings and radio shows presumably - and he was still featured in dance mags after he stopped playing techno

    Leave a comment:


  • Nick Cope
    replied
    Personally, I'm totally jealous. But not of his soundtracks.

    Leave a comment:

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