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  • Johnny Harris on TV

    Don't get too excited now, but did anyone else spot Johnny Harris conducting the orchestra on that clip of Adam Faith they showed at the end of TOTP 2 last night?
    Endless Tripe

  • #2
    Oh yes! For anyone who didn't see it, it was a clip from the 'Pop Goes The Sixties' show from December 1969. Johnny - sorry, Mr Harris - was resplendent in a white polo neck and was giving it some in front of a pink-shirted orchestra. Isn't this the show that he claims to have no memory of? And why doesn't the BBC show the programme in its entirety?
    The Pop Music Library

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    • #3
      Yes, indeed it is. Johnny also does a brilliant performance of '(I can't get no) Satisfaction', done in his usual innovative style, though I've heard this bit is often cut when it's shown on satelite.
      I saw the clip on the end credits of 'Room 101' of all places, where they were taking the mick, the idiots.
      Shame the Beeb wiped 'Uptight' too.

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      • #4
        Was J.H. the musical director on the Lulu Show?Have you seen the clip of Jimi Hendrix on that.His guitar goes madley out of tune.Must have freaked out the oldies in the audience.

        Also check out the Nancy Sinatra web site.There is a photo of her in the studio with Johnny Harris.I never knew he worked with her.
        Back to Neuuuuuuuuuu!

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        • #5
          </span>
          Originally posted by [b
          Quote[/b] ]Quote: from Mumbles on 6:43 pm on Mar. 13, 2003
          Was J.H. the musical director on the Lulu Show?
          <span =''>

          Lord Thames is probably your man for the definitive, deep knowledge here, but I understand that he was indeed musical director on the Lulu show, and wrote and arranged the smashing (and imaginatively titled) theme tune 'Lulu's Theme' as discussed in a previous thread on this forum.

          (Edited by vibra at 1:26 am on Mar. 14, 2003)
          Let him have the lot for £2.00 - we were only going to throw 'em out anyway...

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          • #6
            I retract that earlier statement - in this instance I'm your man for the deep knowledge:

            &quot;This led to him being invited to act as musical director for Lulu's series &quot;Happening For Lulu&quot;. Here Johnny used the same highly visual conducting style and quickly became very popular with audiences and received almost as much fan mail as Lulu. He also conducted the orchestra for Lulu's appearance at the Eurovision Song Contest in Madrid where she won. This made further impact with the public and even influenced comedian Benny Hill to stage his own spoof &quot;European Song Contest&quot; with Benny playing all the contestants as well as the British conductor &quot;Jet Pacey&quot; which was an obvious reference to Johnny's kinetic conducting!&quot;

            Taken from a superb article on the man, to be found here http://www.rfsoc.freeserve.co.uk/jim7.htm
            Let him have the lot for £2.00 - we were only going to throw 'em out anyway...

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            • #7
              Do you know the story behind the discovery of the Hendrix clip?  Some BBC lackey was going through hours of tapes prior to destroying them - they seemed to consist mostly of footage of steam trains, from what I recall - and found this morsel tucked away at the end of one of them.  Despite the popularity of the clip and the number of times it's been shown since his employers never actually thanked him, the poor bloke remarked ruefully.

              Just in case we haven't worked over the topic sufficiently, Lulu's Harris-produced version of 'Show Me' opens with the intro to 'Lulu's Theme' from the TV show before going into the song proper.  'The Most of Lulu vol 2' on MFP is a good way of picking up this beauty for mere kopeks.
              The Pop Music Library

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              • #8
                The BBC want a slap, to be honest. The things they've sat on/ lost don't bear thinking about.

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                • #9
                  </span>
                  Originally posted by [b
                  Quote[/b] ]Quote: from Big Nick on 1:26 pm on Mar. 14, 2003
                  The BBC want a slap, to be honest. The things they've sat on/ lost don't bear thinking about.
                  <span =''>

                  Yeah, well if you ever want proof of a class bias at the BBC you need look no further than the stuff they kept and the stuff they wiped in the 50s and 60s. They've got every Gardener's Question Time from R4, for example, yet they managed to wipe Plays for Today by Dennis Potter. They had/have no respect for popular culture because they saw/see it as transient.
                  http://www.djhistory.com

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                  • #10
                    No argument here, LBG - but I suppose the Beeb weren't alone, as a good portion of those making pop-culture saw it as for-the-cash-hackery to fund their 'serious' contributions...you know, orchestral classics, 'real' jazz etc. Don't know for sure, but I'd be surprised if the Hawkshaws, Harrises, Heaths etc, back in the day, expected the stuff we're all into round here to constitute their lasting legacies. Which is part of its strength: they didn't mess about or take it too seriously, they knocked it out by the yard - often brilliantly, as it happens. Why the BBC figured future generations were going to need complete records of 'Gardeners Question Time' is a mystery in itself, though...

                    (Edited by wayne at 6:57 pm on Mar. 14, 2003)
                    a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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                    • #11
                      </span>
                      Originally posted by [b
                      Quote[/b] ]They've got every Gardener's Question Time from R4, for example, yet they managed to wipe Plays for Today by Dennis Potter. They had/have no respect for popular culture because they saw/see it as transient.
                      <span =''>

                      well put. and they spend all the licence fee money on stupid gimmicky wildlife programmes made out of computer graphics (what was wrong with old-school wildlife programmes anyway?) and robbie williams tv specials. they shut down the radiophonic workshop in 1997 which was one of the most musically creative teams ever. they just don't have a sodding clue.

                      no wonder i don't watch any telly anymore.

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                      • #12
                        </span>[QUOTE=[b]Quote[/b] ]Quote: from wooly on 7:13 pm on Mar. 14, 2003
                        they shut down the radiophonic workshop in 1997 which was one of the most musically creative teams ever. they just don't have a sodding clue.
                        <span =''>

                        And in a ludicrously ironic twist, I recently listened to a great play about Delia Derbyshire in which she complained about being marginalised by the BBC (dramatised speech rather than interview). And it was broadcast by.... the BBC.
                        http://www.djhistory.com

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                        • #13
                          </span>
                          Originally posted by [b
                          Quote[/b] ]And in a ludicrously ironic twist, I recently listened to a great play about Delia Derbyshire in which she complained about being marginalised by the BBC (dramatised speech rather than interview). And it was broadcast by.... the BBC.
                          <span =''>

                          that play was a definite pre-xmas treat.

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                          • #14
                            I've heard that, in spite of the vandalism they inflicted by wiping so many pop / comedy classics, they've kept every single year's trooping the colour (think of the repeat fees there.... did 57's really have the edge on 74's...etc, the debate still rages).

                            Another thing,  I have in my posession a whole bunch of library lps which were evidently just skipped by the bbc when they moved over to cd. I thought these people were supposed to have some kind of overview of the cultural interest of the nation?
                            Endless Tripe

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