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  • Woolf phillips

    CBS Superstereo LP from 1967, in very cheesy light jazz mode, very enjoyable indeed if you're a fan of the kind of sounds that get played over footage of Rita Tushingham walking by canals, or Julie Christie swinging her handbag down Carnaby Street. Thing is, it's packed with top sessioners like Barry Morgan, Duncan Lamont, Laurie Holloway, Leon Calvert, Jerry Allen, Jud Proctor etc, supervised by Monty Babson and made up of 100% original cuts credited to Woolf Phillips. But who is he? A pseudonym or an actual person? Can be highly recommended to all those on here with a taste for the non-funky end of things, though!
    a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

  • #2
    An excellent LP - Woolf was a British trombonist who played in many of the big bands in the 30s and 40s, before striking out on his own He later moved to America, and the Cry Woolf LP required a special journey back to the UK, which was ultimately worth it!

    Sadly he died in July 2003, aged 84 - towards the end of his life he led the Camarillo Symphony Orchestra in California.

    I think I might go and play Cry Woolf, actually - not heard it for a while!

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    • #3
      Cheers for the info! Very good LP, though - listened to it again earlier today, very nice arrangements and playing throughout. Was it a bit of a one off then? From what you say, his other material would be more traditional big band orientated...
      a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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      • #4
        This is the only solo effort of his that I've come across, actually, though I think he's done some library music - whether any of it's any cop I have no idea!

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        • #5
          The library thing sounds plausible, as lots of the tunes on the LP sound very oddly familiar...no idea where from, but it'd explain the deja vu I keep getting from some of these tracks if they were remakes of library tunes, or tracks licensed from a library. Either that, or they just encapsulate the general sound of 60s/early 70s TV themes etc so well they convince me I know them even when I don't...  
          a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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          • #6
            Speaking of trombonists & CBS records I got an early Don Lusher Quartet LP on CBS from '66 last week. It's excellent too, carries a 'Morgan Music' stamp on the rear sleeve & supervision from Monty Babson. First time i've ever seen a proper LP by him & it stans up as a great UK jazz LP (Kenny Clare on drums) w/ some accordian on it too.
            boney
            You can't take a stocking offa bare leg

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            • #7
              There's another Lusher LP on CBS with Pete Moore arranging, with an excellent version of Makin' Whoopee (the song in different versions is on both LPs, for some reason&#33 - unfortunately I don't have either LP.

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