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  • Vpi record cleaners

    I'm debating investing in a VPI and just wanted to know whether any of you guys owned one. I realise they're pretty pricy (between £500-1000) that's why I wanted some advice.

  • #2
    The Oxfam Music in Ealing have one, they seemed to do the job pretty well though I think they had it to save time more then anything else as the manager insisted on cleaning almost every record. I think they managed to get one for under £300 and there was talk of them getting more to sell-on cheap. This was about 6 months ago so I'll drop by when I get a chance and see if anything came of this idea...
    www.myspace.com/thecromagnonband

    http://www.wolfpeople.co.uk

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    • #3
      Nooooooooo!

      You wax butcherer, you.

      It'll scrub your wax up OK once (none better than with isopropyl and clean cloths IMO), and then it's eatty eatty time into the grooves.

      I don't know one collector (except maybe you, mate) who would own one. I've seen shops and dealers with 'em, so they could clean the wax on records they'll never to see again. And sides, that's a lot of chowder!

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      • #4
        I'm sure I've heard guys like Anthony Pearson talking on Soulstrut about them and only being positive. I do know some collectors with them but they are serious jazz collectors paying big money for items.

        This method has got to be more thorough than hand cleaning surely? I was under the impression that hand cleaning just pushed the grime deper into the grooves than it already was?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by [b
          Quote[/b] (Belson @ Nov. 11 2004,13:56)]It'll scrub your wax up OK once (none better than with isopropyl and clean cloths IMO), and then it's eatty eatty time into the grooves.
          Greg, when you say it will eat away do you mean if you clean the same record more than once on the machine or do you mean the chemicals used will damage the record after one clean?

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          • #6
            there's a shop up here that's got one and to be honest, i've been pretty disappointed with the results when i've had stuff cleaned on it...in fact, one particularly knackered record sounded worse after a second cleaning....

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            • #7
              That's interesting to know.

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              • #8
                Smallfish charge £1 a record and I did a load for ebay and I would say it made little to no difference.

                Hand washing with your finger into the grooves is so much better for the vinyl.
                www.thesoundlibrary.net <- Changed URL

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by [b
                  Quote[/b] (llmod1 @ Nov. 11 2004,14:12)]
                  Originally posted by [b
                  Quote[/b] (Belson @ Nov. 11 2004,13:56)]It&#39;ll scrub your wax up OK once (none better than with isopropyl and clean cloths IMO), and then it&#39;s eatty eatty time into the grooves.
                  Greg, when you say it will eat away do you mean if you clean the same record more than once on the machine or do you mean the chemicals used will damage the record after one clean?
                  It&#39;s a machine, Mark - I wouldn&#39;t trust it as far as I could throw it.

                  It&#39;s when you add up all the factors (chemicals, moving parts, etc), that you realise the best method is the one involving some of your own elbow grease, or not, if ya get me : ).

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                  • #10
                    there are at least ( or were at least) three different companies making cleaning machines.........i think the vpi is the one with the arm that move across the surface right.....?
                    it runs silently........this is a much better machine than the Moth.......the Moth is the cheapest but it makes a hell of a racket and it&#39;s quite crude..........you have to be careful &#39;cause it&#39;s fairly easy to damage records with it..........
                    just a bit of grit on the felt pads can result in a bad scratch..........basically i&#39;d agree with most of what&#39;s been said already...........don&#39;t bother.........cleaning machines are good for dealers who want to make the vinyl look and sound clean in order to sell on...........if you&#39;ve got a few hundred lps to clean it&#39;s a lot quicker than doing it by hand..........
                    i know that a lot of serious collectors and audiophile nuts don&#39;t like any machine.........they claim that it changes the sound quality.....leaving a film of solution on the surface etc........clean them by hand mate and use the dough to buy records.....&#33;&#33;

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                    • #11
                      Well you could save a bunch of money by making your own

                      http://www.teresaudio.com/haven/cleaner/cleaner.html

                      The Unique Selling Point for the mahines seems to be they suck the crud and liquid out of the groove rather than leaving it on the recor. Which sounds good in theory to me as I&#39;ve often been a bit underwhelmed by the results of hand cleaning.
                      Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                      John Peel

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                      • #12
                        I&#39;d say that by fdat the best option is to use the Keith Monk LP cleaner the BBC use. A unit will cost you a few grand, but it does the job superbly, and I personally would strongly reccomend *not* cleaning LPs by hand.
                        A leaping rocker with a strong mood, a moderate beat and a safari feel.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by [b
                          Quote[/b] (Cameron @ Nov. 11 2004,20:28)]A unit will cost you a few grand, but it does the job superbly, and I personally would strongly reccomend *not* cleaning LPs by hand.
                          OK, don&#39;t leave it there - a little explanation please.

                          That goes against every professional dealer and worthwhile collectors advice I know.

                          I&#39;ve cleaned more records by hand and by a method used in Detroit record shops (and I&#39;m sure, many others) for years probably counting into the 100&#39;s of thousands. On the way removing anything from plain old storage dust to 20 year old encrusted jam/jelly depending on which side of the pond you&#39;re on.

                          So I&#39;ld appreciate the enlightenment since you strongly advise against it.

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