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  • Old Soul Mag's

    I have recently found a copy of 'Black Music' magazine from 1974 - the educational part for me has been the classified ads and reviews. Being three years old at the time, its interesting to get a contemporary feel for how the music we listen to now was perceived. I was drawn to this short review of Melvin Bliss 'Synthetic Substitution' (see below) I thought it summed the tune up quite nicely.

    There are some crazy ads for DJ's at the back, also I would not mind sending off for some of those £1 Soul packs.

    Has anyone else got similar reviews? Are there any other Mag's from this period worth looking out for?

    theprogram

  • #2
    Nick, can you book Disco Bob for the Salmon, please?
    You freeking scientologists are all the same, quible, dribble and then demand ice creams. Ohhhhhhhhhhh.

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    • #3
      "Funky Soul Super Hifi Regmatic One Time DJ"

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      • #4
        All the Black Musics you see are worth picking up. It was a really good magazine but it didn't last very long (maybe two years?), from about 74-76. The guy that ran it, Tony Cummings, was a bit of a madman if you ask me (which you aren't admittedly) and is now a born-again Christian on some sort of evangelist radio station. He don't play the devil's music no more, baby. he also wrote a book on Phildalphia soul that is so full of detail it's actually incomprehensible. God is welcome to him

        Blues & Soul's well worth picking up too, from 60s through to 80s.

        There are a few fanziney things that have existed over the years but I can't remember what halg of them are called. Soul Underground? Voices From The Shadows? God knows. you can get Tony Cummings to ask him for you.
        http://www.djhistory.com

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        • #5
          I picked what must be nearly a full set of BMs at a boot sale a couple or three years ago

          As well as Tony Cummins they had the great Davitt Sigerson. He used to do a regular feature on what he regarded as influential records of the day with some interesting choices. Because he was a bit of a muso himself he was able to give quite a unique perspective on how records are put together. The one he wrote on “Atmosphere Strut” is amazing. Incidentally, he also had a hand in Disco Dub Band “For the Love of Money” (and I believe went on to do film soundtracks).

          The 7” reviews are always interesting too both to see some of the mad things that got UK releases and because they would list every US 7” that came out that month.

          BTW the best soul fanzine is the brilliant (but extremely sporadic) "Shades of Soul"
          Last edited by son of stan; 26-01-2005, 12:55 PM.
          Endless Tripe

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          • #6
            Originally posted by son of stan
            I picked what must be nearly a full set of BMs at a boot sale a couple or three years ago

            As well as Tony Cummins they had the great Davitt Sigerson. He used to do a regular feature on what he regarded as influential records of the day with some interesting choices. Because he was a bit of a muso himself he was able to give quite a unique perspective on how records are put together. The one he wrote on “Atmosphere Strut” is amazing. Incidentally, he also had a hand in Disco Dub Band “For the Love of Money” (and I believe went on to do film soundtracks).

            The 7” reviews are always interesting too both to see some of the mad things that got UK releases and because they would list every US 7” that came out that month.

            BTW the best soul fanzine is the brilliant (but extremely sporadic) "Voices From The Shadows"
            Had a hand in is putting it mildly. As far as I know, he WAS Disco Dub Band.
            http://www.djhistory.com

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ladyboygrimsby
              Had a hand in is putting it mildly. As far as I know, he WAS Disco Dub Band.
              There's an article in one of those BMs about some other bloke that was involved in it. Can't remember what he was called, an American (I think) based in London who mainly did UK reggae stuff. Anyway whoever it was talks about having recorded it and how it is going to be the "first ever dub disco record". (I'll check out the details when I get home and post more info).

              (Oh and I didn't mean Voices from trhe Shadows, I meant "Shades of Soul")
              Endless Tripe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ladyboygrimsby
                ... Had a hand in is putting it mildly. As far as I know, he WAS Disco Dub Band...


                .. just found a minty copy of this - what a nice little 45 !
                If you're looking for a pristine copy then this isn't the one for you. The vinyl looks like someone has polished their brickwork with it and the label has been ruined by some fool with a pen.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sie Vulture


                  .. just found a minty copy of this - what a nice little 45 !
                  If anyone's got a spare, I'm after one, too, mine's knackered.

                  SOS: Let me know if you find that piece I'd be interested in seeing it.
                  http://www.djhistory.com

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the excellent info guys!

                    I'm now on a quest to find 'Disco Bob'

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ladyboygrimsby
                      If anyone's got a spare, I'm after one, too, mine's knackered.

                      SOS: Let me know if you find that piece I'd be interested in seeing it.
                      Okay, the fella I was thinking of was called Mike Dorane. Came to Europe from the USA in the 60s, had two top ten hits in Germany when he was 16 (doesn't say what they were). Worked as a session bass player for Pama and on various Uk reggae productions. In 75, he took his demos to Island and they impressed Chris Blackwell so much that they gave Dorane his own label, Rockers. Movers (which Disco Dub Band came out on) was an offshoot of that which was intended for his soul / funk oriented output.

                      The BM article describes his way of making records: playing all the instruments himself - rhythm guitar, drums, bass, organ, lead guitar and synths. It suggests that the Disco Dub Band record was made the same way (describing Davitt Sigerson as the producer).

                      There seems to be some kind of tie up with "Black Music" mag. This article was written by Tony Cummings (who also produced one of the reggae records strongly featured!)

                      Hope this is of interest.

                      (Bill, I'll sort you out a photocopy of this article if you want).
                      Endless Tripe

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