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Regional Accents in UK music

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  • Regional Accents in UK music

    So, I've been listening to the brilliant Sleaford Mods track "Donkey" pretty much on repeat. It's very evocative for me of the time of my life when I lived in Nottingham and I'd hear similar accents on a daily basis. I was struck by the fact that we have some incredible accents in the UK and I wondered what people's favourite usages of regional accents in songs? Obviously hip hop puts a premium on accent (I think that a big part of the appeal to me of Southern hip hop is that those drawls sound so gooooooo), but I'm interested in what's made it's what outwith these circles. I guess Mark E Smith would be one of the most striking example.

    'm particularly interested in the survival of odd and archaic regional words as well. There's a great scene in Billy Liar where the protagonist is talking to a local guy who lets rip with some incredible Yorkshire verbiage. I'll try and find it when it's not 6.30AM.

    "As technology has advanced, vinyl records are outdated as they are music from the 19th Century so only hipsters and elderly people buy vinyl records".

    Mixes for your delectation: http://www.mixcloud.com/danmatic/

  • #2
    Everyone tear down your own little wall
    That keeps you from being a part of it all
    Because you've got to be one with the one and all
    You've just got to be close to it all

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    • #3
      How could I forgot the Eccentronic Research Council! They have been my other favourite new band, and a big part of the appeal is Maxine Peake's vocals.



      Treeboy - that is great! I like how her accent seems to get heavier throughout the song. It reminds me of a 45 I've got somewhere - Carol Elvin maybe?
      "As technology has advanced, vinyl records are outdated as they are music from the 19th Century so only hipsters and elderly people buy vinyl records".

      Mixes for your delectation: http://www.mixcloud.com/danmatic/

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      • #4
        We've done this thread before. I remember as it introduced me to Eclectic Mud fave 'lover please' by the Vernon Girls. Can someone with better search skills than I link it?
        "..hole...road...middle thereof"

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        • #5
          I started this one a while back.
          Never a bad time to listen to Railway Jimmy.
          To infinity - and beyond!

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          • #6
            Students LOVE writing about accent in pop music. There are five key USA language features that were very very common in the 60s and are still prevalent now. Essays go like:

            1. USA five in British 60s music to now.
            2. Example of the Beatles and how useage of USA five declined as their career progressed.
            3. Suggest accent has something to do with popularity and artistic confidence and audience etc.
            4. Insert favourite band and discuss USA five.
            5. But what about Oasis/Blur/Ian Drury/Wurzels/Arctic Monkeys?
            6. Hmm, forward theory based on favourite artist's work
            7. And what if they covered the Chas N Dave songbook???

            Maybe not 7. Only the best students get as far as 7.

            There's also someone in my department who has done research on the first Arctic Monkeys album, especially the specific pronunication of the word 'right'. It indexes a traditional, very old Sheffield accent, which was declining in popularity, especially amongst the young, but is now all the rage thanks in part to them.
            Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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            • #7
              What are the five key USA language features? Is one 'bayyybeeee'?
              SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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              • #8
                This should EXPLAIN EVERYTHING:



                And yes, that non-prevcalic /r/ DOES return slightly in Help, as you argued on Sunday. My mistake.

                Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by eine View Post
                  This should EXPLAIN EVERYTHING:

                  Number 2 is pretty much standard everywhere outside southern England (although some Geordies weirdly say headmarster and plarster) and Scottish and Irish are rhotic.

                  I´d have thought nasality would have been one of them.

                  A grarph of David Bowie's mutating accent from Larfing Gnome to Let´s Dance (not Darnce) would be interesting
                  Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                  • #10
                    Able seamen - parlour talk (Bristol), first one to spot/name the sample wins a prize!


                    anything by Goldie looking chain (s. wales)
                    Vernons girls - you know what I mean (60s scouse-isms aplenty)
                    erm...Uncle Joe's mintballs (Yorkshire), also Jake Thackray
                    Both sides of Herman's hermits (60s London) also Madness perhaps.
                    erm...The proclaimers
                    "THIS IS A FINE TAPE AND BRINGS BACK MEMORIES OF YESTERYEAR WHEN THE MUSIC WORLD WAS GOOD AND NOT FOULED UP BY THE LONG HAIR SCURVES WHO JUST BEAT WILDLY ON ANYTHING AND COME UP WITH A LOT OF STUPID NOISE THat only damnfools and liars say they like it"

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by eine View Post
                      This should EXPLAIN EVERYTHING:



                      And yes, that non-prevcalic /r/ DOES return slightly in Help, as you argued on Sunday. My mistake.

                      Matt, you have broken my clever bone with a single incomprehensible table. I felt the same way when recently confronted by a fuse box. Talk me through it tonight, please.
                      SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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                      • #12
                        To be completely honest, trsansparent and clear, I don't really get this stuff at all
                        Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

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                        • #13
                          Can the panel construct a sentence utilising all five elements?
                          SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                            Can the panel construct a sentence utilising all five elements?
                            I studied English Phonetics last year so it´s all clear as a bell to me.

                            My little girl, you dance so hot

                            American: mah liddle gurrrl, you dance so haht
                            English: My littul girl, you darnce so hot
                            Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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                            • #15
                              Correct.

                              Three questions now about European wars of the 17th century...

                              Very useful, BC, thanks.
                              SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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