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  • Hauntology?

    im curently reading Retromania: Pop Culture's Addiction to its Own Past by Simon Reynolds.
    its just got on to sampling and has started talking about hauntology, boards of canada, ghost box and the like.
    now ive seen all that mentioned here, but didnt really know what it was and kind of stayed away from all of it. but the descriptions in the book sound like its exactly what i would like. so now i feel a bit stupid for not exploring it.
    so what im looking for is a pointer to the best example, so i can then start exploring the genre / whole thing.

    i always seem to be about 5 - 10 years behind everyone else
    instagram.com/vinylhoard

  • #2
    PM me an address, Paul, and I'll do you a compilation. I would definitely recommend Ghost Box, but also Pye Corner Audio. Boards of Canada predate the 'movement' but tick the boxes. I wrote a bit about it here in which I make several claims, including the one that the Broadcast / Focus Group LP is a defining moment in world history.
    Last edited by ginghamkitchen; 27-01-2014, 04:08 PM.
    SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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    • #3
      There was a good comp called "Children of The Drones" that I heard on some blog. It was hauntological as fuck. Though plenty fo the music was old 70s stuff that pre-figures hauntology. Similarly some Trunk releases (Seasons, Blood On Satan's Claw) could be seen as pre-cursors. I'd be interested to take a look at your comp Paul. Though I do know at least some of the main players.
      Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

      John Peel

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      • #4
        i have both of them Trunk releases. love both of them. the newish classroom projects lp they did is also amazing.
        instagram.com/vinylhoard

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        • #5
          The Children Of The Drones comp was produced by my friend Andrew on his Cottage Of Electric Hell blog. I am happy to announce that Andrew and I are currently working on creating a series of secret tapes to be made available starting in March. Here's one we did earlier - http://cottageofelectrichell.blogspo...s-of-evil.html - but the new stuff is all of our own making. Be afraid - I'm doing the vocals.

          Perhaps I could up the comp on the Fringe Download Swap page? Is that a more 21st century solution?
          SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
            PM me an address, Paul, and I'll do you a compilation this weekend..
            Dare I suggest you stick this up as part of the Fringe Download Swap? I'd be very keen to hear it. I sometimes delibarately limit what I take on, just as a way of keeping on top of listening, but on listening to the Eccentronic Research Council recently, it struck me how much I like this stuff.
            "As technology has advanced, vinyl records are outdated as they are music from the 19th Century so only hipsters and elderly people buy vinyl records".

            Mixes for your delectation: http://www.mixcloud.com/danmatic/

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            • #7
              Great minds, etc - see above.
              SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ginghamkitchen View Post
                Great minds, etc - see above.
                Make it so.

                I doubtless came to that blog from yours and it has some really interesting stuff.
                Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                John Peel

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                • #9
                  i was recently struck by an interesting article on how movements make their own precursors. hauntology seems one of those in particular. it's the distillation of a particular kind of 70s British thing a lot of the time, with library synths, slightly creepy public service announcements, etc; not so much an new thing as a focus on the previously ignored interstitials and details of old things.

                  i'd point toward Moon Wiring Club and Demdike Stare for recommendations, if you should see them out; the latter in particular have done some very nice coloured vinyl EPs recently.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by spacefin View Post
                    i was recently struck by an interesting article on how movements make their own precursors. hauntology seems one of those in particular. it's the distillation of a particular kind of 70s British thing a lot of the time, with library synths, slightly creepy public service announcements, etc; not so much an new thing as a focus on the previously ignored interstitials and details of old things.
                    i'd echo (in an appropraitely eerie and ever-so-slightly sinister way) the above, adding only the question about its geog-specific sense. are there non-UK European elements / leading lights on the scene, or is it a specifically British (and in many cases, English) aural lens?

                    Originally posted by spacefin View Post
                    i'd point toward Moon Wiring Club and Demdike Stare for recommendations, if you should see them out; the latter in particular have done some very nice coloured vinyl EPs recently.
                    as an aside, that Demdike Canty bloke used to hang out here a bit too, before all that success went to his head where are you Sean?

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                    • #11
                      I think it's mostly a British thing in it's purest sense. There is a distinction between Hauntology and all the horror infused music around at the moment, but it's rather an academic one. It's a genre that, for me, perfectly reflects a very 21st century approach to enjoying music - the artist more or less outlines their reference points and what they are seeking to achieve and the listener (if they like the pitch) buys into the process. That doesn't mean that the music is secondary (it some cases, it's quite extraordinary) but understanding the context is extremely important.

                      I'm going to see Demdike Stare in a couple of weeks, Al, I'll have it out with him then.
                      SPIRIT DUPLICATOR Est 2015.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by alanmck View Post
                        as an aside, that Demdike Canty bloke used to hang out here a bit too, before all that success went to his head where are you Sean?
                        I'm pretty sure Demdike have distanced themselves from any accusations of hauntology, after being baited by Simon Reynolds to define themselves. So no, they probably wouldn't describe themselves as hauntological.

                        The Scarfolk Council blog is very amusing and somewhat relevant, in case you find it all a little too dry and serious.
                        You freeking scientologists are all the same, quible, dribble and then demand ice creams. Ohhhhhhhhhhh.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by spacefin View Post
                          i was recently struck by an interesting article on how movements make their own precursors. hauntology seems one of those in particular. it's the distillation of a particular kind of 70s British thing a lot of the time, with library synths, slightly creepy public service announcements, etc; not so much an new thing as a focus on the previously ignored interstitials and details of old things.
                          Sure is. Acid Jazz and/or Rare Groove would certainly seem like a similar case.
                          Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                          John Peel

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                          • #14
                            With regards that Scarfolk blog: There was a fun Ghost Box night at the ICA on Saturday. Screenings of some Julian House films (including a promo short for the new Soundcarriers album which sounds ACE) plus a Q&A with Julian and a DJ set afterwards in the bar. "Look Around You" was mentioned as a kind of tongue-in-cheek companion. I concur...
                            Drastically reduced to 72p

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by alanmck View Post
                              i'd echo (in an appropraitely eerie and ever-so-slightly sinister way) the above, adding only the question about its geog-specific sense. are there non-UK European elements / leading lights on the scene, or is it a specifically British (and in many cases, English) aural lens?
                              There´s interest in Spain, as this blog from a couple of years ago in El Pais shows. The author´s name also refers to the Spanish "bizarro" concept, which involves digging up weird and fascinating cultural nuggets from the past, although usually with a strong emphasis on camp.

                              IOt strikes me that Spanish band Vainica Doble were doing something similar over 30 years ago, blending folk, psychedelia, children´s stories and songs, psychology, soundtracks, TV themes and visual art into an overall concept that, I think, is unique.
                              Elegy to my Grandmother´s Garden is, as the comment says "a song of ghosts", and even samples an old 78.

                              Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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