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  • A question about 1960's record buyers

    Has anyone ever met a music fan who was a young adult (and therefore had disposable cash to waste on records) in the 1960's who was actually a fan of psych music, bought psych records as they were released and still enjoys that genre now?

    I know this is a pretty random question but all the guys I know in the local record circles are just a little too young to have bought Skip Bifferty in 1968 so they tend to be of an age where their first record purchases were Sabbath, Zeppelin, Genesis etc etc circa early/mid 70's rock/prog. It was only in later years and still now that they're trying to buy those late 60's rarities that adorn Galactic Ramble.

    It would be nice for once to meet someone who is still buying records but back in 1967/68 was popping into their local record shop and buying Tomorrow, Kaleidoscope, July or even the US psych that may have got imported into the UK at the time. Pretty much the stuff that all psych collectors go gaga about now and pay huge sums to own.

    Older guys I've met just seem to have been all about The Beatles, Stones and the most psychedelic they got was a Hendrix or early Floyd LP...basically just real obvious artists (or is that because I live in the north of England where LSD consuming hippies weren't welcome )
    "Don't get involved in the f**kin' chat pages. It's just full of arseholes talkin' sh*te non-stop"

  • #2
    Originally posted by Campag Record View Post
    Has anyone ever met a music fan who was a young adult (and therefore had disposable cash to waste on records) in the 1960's who was actually a fan of psych music, bought psych records as they were released and still enjoys that genre now?
    Good question. And the answer is no. I can't think of anyone (parents, older types back then) I knew who went for this type of stuff.
    Later on (70s) I did have a good mate who had the most amazing prog / kraut / rock collection, before anyone had heard of Can, Amon Duul etc. And then punk came along and broke his world.
    some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

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    • #3
      Used to be in a band with a guy 10 years older than me, so born in 1950, who would go on about the Idle Race and John's Children and the Pink Fairies and so on, all of whose records he had bought at the time........but unfortunately, not kept.
      Those funny cars won't make the teardrops start/ but way up there is where she broke my heart

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      • #4
        Late 70s I was part of an extended network of friends, some of whom were of that age. During my "musical education" I was leant some extraordinary records by various older hippie types, some of which, to my disgrace, I still have. These include originals of Sea Shanties by High Tide, Cosmic Sounds, The Left Banke Too. Spent many evenings listening to great records and generally soaking it all up. Later on, I had some interesting conversations with Bill Allerton about buying records in the mid-late 60s. He was buying stuff like the Eyes ep when it came out. He also told me about a place called Vintage Vinyl I think (?) where you could pick up (early 70s) all those (nowadays) mega rare UK psych 45s you had missed, for cheap. Spent an evening 'round Nick Salamons house in Walthamstow listening to some of his incredible collection, he was picking stuff up back then too. John Falkner sells at Luton and is now at the stage where he is selling off his collection. He's an interesting guy to talk to if ever you are up there. When I was raving about seeing July at LBB, he nonchalantly shrugged his shoulders "been there, done it!" Most people of that age I know (knew in some cases sadly) are far less starry eyed about that period than the people(me For instance) who feel they missed out on something extraordinary. That's just the way it is I suppose.
        Everyone tear down your own little wall
        That keeps you from being a part of it all
        Because you've got to be one with the one and all
        You've just got to be close to it all

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        • #5
          Yes, a damn good question - the answer has to be no - but the explanation why would probably need a book length essay since it tests to the limit anyone's ability to think historically. For a start, in the mid-sixties, your knowledge of new music was pretty much limited to what you heard on the radio (little beyond the 'Top 20'), saw on the TV (little at all) or what was in the inkies at a time when the NME was staffed by ageing jazzers who'd never really got beyond 'bebop vs trad jazz' or 'can white men sing the blues?' type debates. Not an auspicious place to start.

          People like the Beatles and the Stones were in a better position to soak up new influences and it was the effect of these on their own music that probably hipped most people to a wider range of sounds, assisted by pirate radio, an emergent underground press and the greater self indulgence afforded by steady employment, the possibilities afforded by further education (art schools were big in this respect) and relative wealth...

          Perhaps the growing self-awareness of youth was the main catalyst - it's easy I think to overestimate the effects of radical politics, pot and acid, the paraphernalia of psych itself- these remained the preserve of a small clique - I think most people who got into psych did so in a rather naive and innocent way - 'because they liked the music', although I do recall my mum and grandma in the late 60's trying to dissuade the seven or eight year old me from playing with the colourful and hairy young people who would sit out on the grass in Sheffield's Peace Gardens.

          But if psych was born of youthful self-awareness, in that were also the seeds of it's destruction - it was now possible to be 'younger' for longer, and fashion and pop exploited this to the max, leading people to believe they had to 'move with the times' to be seen as relevant, leading to the almost Stalinist factionalism that occurred in the punk/new wave era.

          I've just remembered being introduced to Andy Ellison in 1978 - 'Wow,' I thought. 'Look at me, hanging with the singer from the Radio Stars!' Of course, despite the fact that he looked a little older than most punky types, I hadn't a clue of his John's Children past. Stuff like that just wasn't talked about at best and often actively denied, because pop was about youth...

          It would be another 20 years before it all started coming out in the wash in the sleeve notes of CD retrospectives. Hope this gives you a flavour...
          you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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          • #6
            Thanks for the responses guys....all very interesting.
            "Don't get involved in the f**kin' chat pages. It's just full of arseholes talkin' sh*te non-stop"

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            • #7
              Fascinating thread. I hope for some more responses.
              "As technology has advanced, vinyl records are outdated as they are music from the 19th Century so only hipsters and elderly people buy vinyl records".

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tsundoku View Post
                Fascinating thread. I hope for some more responses.
                I was thinking the very same! I think it has been mentioned before, but 22 shillings was a fair bit of money back then for a proper album, hence the profusion of cheapo major label offshoots. The friend I mentioned above was jammy enough to have won a modest amount on the pools back in the 70s, hence his incredible collection!

                Just to add, and get all nostalgic, at the top of Brixton Hill where the Sainsburys is, that space used to be a Harlequin records shop. Can you imagine what it would be like to go back in time?
                some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

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                • #9
                  The North East was not really a hotbed of psych, but there was a small scene and I know someone who was a teen and was buying a lot of obscure stuff as it came out and continued to buy it to sell on throughout the 70s and 80s. I remember he used to regularly have a stall at Newcastle record fairs in the 80s and he had loads of amazing stuff, Blossom Toes first, Gods LPs, Kaleidoscope Faintly, lots of Vertigo swirls and they were all in the £10-£15 range. He used to have visits from London dealers and shops like Vinyl Experience to buy up things. I bought a fair few things but I was just a schoolboy with very little pocket money so a tenner was a lot. I've kind of lost touch with him now but he had an amazing collection although all was for sale. I remember him telling me that all the new overtly psych groups including those that never recorded were just young kids really but caught up in the times and trying to do something new.

                  My uncle was into psych at the time and had things like Grateful Dead, Blue Cheer and stuff. I remember showing him my copy of Skip Bifferty I had recently bought for the small fortune of £15 and he said "oh yeah, everyone had a copy of that". Not sure if he was serious or just trying to stop me going on about records.

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                  • #10
                    Most of the people I sell this stuff to are in their 30s and 40s.

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                    • #11
                      I think there was an added channel for awareness of obscure psuch bands which was live gigs. Where a band did regular gigs probbaly led to a small amount of people being aware of and buying their records. Its common enough to enounter some elder types modest collection which will be mainly mainstream/obvious stuff with some obscure but regionally popular enough psych grail. Round here it would most likely be Mushroom's "One Fine Morning" in their with Pink Floyd's Relics and some battered Stones lp. The owner wouldn't have it due to an interest in the genre so much as "Oh yeah those guys used to play at my college". Or in the case of a cousin of my Dad's who used to go see Hawkwind but had no idea that they ever lasted beyond 1970 or had a succesful music career.
                      Enthusiastic vagueness passes for scholarship in the twilight world of the disc-jockey.

                      John Peel

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
                        I think there was an added channel for awareness of obscure psuch bands which was live gigs. Where a band did regular gigs probbaly led to a small amount of people being aware of and buying their records. Its common enough to enounter some elder types modest collection which will be mainly mainstream/obvious stuff with some obscure but regionally popular enough psych grail. Round here it would most likely be Mushroom's "One Fine Morning" in their with Pink Floyd's Relics and some battered Stones lp. The owner wouldn't have it due to an interest in the genre so much as "Oh yeah those guys used to play at my college". Or in the case of a cousin of my Dad's who used to go see Hawkwind but had no idea that they ever lasted beyond 1970 or had a succesful music career.
                        Yep agree with that - I remember the local secondhand record shop (see my avatar) was full of '2nd division' and local psych/prog LPs. Turned out a lot of those bands had played small clubs or support to major name acts in the city. There was a 'jazz' club who used to book people like The Skatalites alongside Tubby Hayes and Stan Tracey ...well they ARE really great jazz musicians, regardless of syncopation.

                        Used to go through friends' parents record collections and there'd always be some really interesting 'spice' amongst the big names....and often an interesting story to go with them.
                        "Cover condition:Is perfect except on back cover theres an area of dirty smudge dont know what it is and covers a bit wrinkled which im sure could be flattened out"


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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by medlar View Post

                          Just to add, and get all nostalgic, at the top of Brixton Hill where the Sainsburys is, that space used to be a Harlequin records shop. Can you imagine what it would be like to go back in time?
                          I bought this in the Harlequin's shop off Piccadilly Circus in the mid-70s:



                          http://www.britishrecordshoparchive.org/harlequin.html

                          and yes it would be great to go back in time and see what delights I missed in the Jazz section that day

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by medlar View Post
                            22 shillings was a fair bit of money back then for a proper album
                            Damn straight. A colleague of mine told me that she used to save up for LPs, play them once to record onto cassette for listening purposes, and then file them away to keep them safe. Have been pestering her to let me at least have a look at those LPs for as long as I've worked with her, but no dice. She did tell me she bought a Fairport Convention LP the day it was released here so I really want to see what else she has squirelled away.

                            Originally posted by emperor tomato ketchup View Post
                            I think there was an added channel for awareness of obscure psuch bands which was live gigs.
                            Very true. Works for Jazz, too. I took you both to Jazz Michaux, didn't I? He used to see a lot of musicians play at clubs on the US bases, where he could get a lot of LPs at a fraction of what they would have cost in the regular shops.

                            Did any of our German posters (or their parents) have similar experiences, I wonder?
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                            • #15
                              trying not to change the subject, but it must be the same for all genres. A lot of the doom fans now are looking for records that came out in the 90s. and a few of my mates talk about releases they are after that are worth loads now but i bought at the time.
                              a lot of bands only get found out about after a long time, apart from locally as stated above. it takes a few years for these releases to become sought after.
                              you wouldnt have thought of fans in Birmingham for example looking for American Psych, but thye would have seen Fairport and third ear band locally (as my dad often reminds me). my dad used to buy records every weekend, but he would pay half and his mate paid half. my dad got to play it first and tape it, his mate kept the record. as he was only going to tape it as well it must have seemed a fair deal at the time.
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