Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Rep your biggest pet peeve(s)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #91
    Originally posted by jb stanislas View Post
    Also, everything seems to be "awesome" here. Someone got a new record or pair of boots etc.. and they are awesome. That is my pet peeve.

    Comment


    • #92
      The toilet roll dispenser at work holds two toilet rolls one on top of the other. When the bottom one is finished the cylinder holding the, now empty, roll breaks in half (it seems by design) and falls on the floor thus allowing the full roll on top to take its place.

      My peeve is not that the bits fall on the floor (although the design could be better), it’s that certain individuals don’t bother to pick them up when they do fall, they just leave them where they have fallen. These are no doubt the same people who have the “that’s not my job” attitude in work. One day we will have an elf and safety ‘major’ where somebody walks into the loo, puts their foot on one of the cylinders (which have a habit of rolling outside of the trap), and end up breaking their neck.

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by jb stanislas View Post
        In the UK, is the word "like" over-used by people when describing something? It is here in Australia.
        Also, everything seems to be "awesome" here. Someone got a new record or pair of boots etc.. and they are awesome. That is my pet peeve.
        "like" - yes over-used , especially by the kids.

        "awesome" - also a pain. It used to be that everything was simply great:

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by candiman View Post
          My peeve is not that the bits fall on the floor (although the design could be better), it’s that certain individuals don’t bother to pick them up when they do fall, they just leave them where they have fallen. These are no doubt the same people who have the “that’s not my job” attitude in work. One day we will have an elf and safety ‘major’ where somebody walks into the loo, puts their foot on one of the cylinders (which have a habit of rolling outside of the trap), and end up breaking their neck.
          Precise peeves are the best. So Candiman, do you always pick them up when you see them on the floor? Ethically, you must, right, as it'll make you worse than the person letting them fall in the first place. Once you do, however, it may become 'your job'. I think the correct course of action in this instance is to print up a note:

          IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
          PLEASE DON'T LEAVE THE TWO HALVES LYING ON THE FLOOR
          IT'S IRRITATING AND DANGEROUS
          IT'S YOUR JOB TO CLEAN THEM UP

          This kind of communication is what toilets are for. There's also, if I may say so myself, a buried faecal poetry to this.
          Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by eine View Post
            Precise peeves are the best. So Candiman, do you always pick them up when you see them on the floor? Ethically, you must, right, as it'll make you worse than the person letting them fall in the first place. Once you do, however, it may become 'your job'. I think the correct course of action in this instance is to print up a note:

            IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
            PLEASE DON'T LEAVE THE TWO HALVES LYING ON THE FLOOR
            IT'S IRRITATING AND DANGEROUS
            IT'S YOUR JOB TO CLEAN THEM UP

            This kind of communication is what toilets are for. There's also, if I may say so myself, a buried faecal poetry to this.
            I think this is a bit bossy and would make me want to leave the cylinders on the floor even if I was previously going to pick them up.
            A humorous message would have better results, I think, eg.

            IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
            PLEASE DON'T LEAVE THE TWO HALVES LYING ON THE FLOOR
            IT'S IRRITATING AND DANGEROUS
            IT'S YOUR JOB TO CLEAN THEM UP
            Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

            Comment


            • #96
              Originally posted by babycart View Post
              I think this is a bit bossy and would make me want to leave the cylinders on the floor even if I was previously going to pick them up.
              You are more rebellious then me, but you're right, the cat has cheered me up a lot. It's a little irrelevant though? What about



              Could that be a pic of aforementioned two cylinders? If so, I would be irritated with them lying on the floor.

              IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
              GATHER THEM UP
              AND DEPOSIT THEM IN THE BIN
              NEVER THE TOILET
              Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by eine View Post
                You are more rebellious then me, but you're right, the cat has cheered me up a lot. It's a little irrelevant though? What about



                Could that be a pic of aforementioned two cylinders? If so, I would be irritated with them lying on the floor.

                IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
                GATHER THEM UP
                AND DEPOSIT THEM IN THE BIN
                NEVER THE TOILET
                Can I refer you to one of my peeves upthread?
                Too much capitalisation
                "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

                Night of the Living Vinyl

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by eine View Post
                  Precise peeves are the best. So Candiman, do you always pick them up when you see them on the floor? Ethically, you must, right, as it'll make you worse than the person letting them fall in the first place. Once you do, however, it may become 'your job'. I think the correct course of action in this instance is to print up a note:

                  IF THE VACANT CYLINDER SPLITS ON YOUR WATCH
                  PLEASE DON'T LEAVE THE TWO HALVES LYING ON THE FLOOR
                  IT'S IRRITATING AND DANGEROUS
                  IT'S YOUR JOB TO CLEAN THEM UP

                  This kind of communication is what toilets are for. There's also, if I may say so myself, a buried faecal poetry to this.
                  I pick them up of course - except one time when I could only find one half. It is not a large loo (two of everything) and I looked everywhere. (A contender for a new thread: Rep your biggest unsolved mystery )

                  A notice? Hmm. It is not a large loo because it doesn't really need to be. There are a total of 13 males. The 13 includes me, elf & safety officer, md, and two who are not often in the office. It's not me, it won't be elf & safety man (very true to his cause) or md (only recently installed on our floor, it wouldn't be him anyway), nor the other two (by process of elimination). So down to 8 possibles. In such an intimate environment the trouble with a notice along the lines of above is people will immediately think H&S man has put it up (nothing wrong wirth that I suppose). If I worded a notice it would be sure to end up being a bit more playful, and again I would probably be fingered for it straightaway.

                  (Sorry for any unintentional double entendres in the above!)

                  Almost a la Cluedo I could wait until there were only one or two in the office, go into the loo, almost empty a toilet roll, then wait for other people to use the facilities and see what transpires. Eventually the culprit would be caught with his pants down!

                  (That one was entirely intentional).

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Yet another person who's name starts with "J" that gets the "Jihadi" tag:

                    http://tinyurl.com/o7rzduv

                    Comment


                    • Certainly a situation over there candiman.

                      Could be just a single culprit or more than one (working separately one would imagine, not together). There may even be 'unknown perpetrators' amongst you (ie people on whose watch the cylinder has not yet split, so we just don't know how they would react). We also have to consider that some people are oblivious, so focused on the task in hand they don't notice the larger consequences of their actions. We also have to remember that people are not always predictable and can do one thing one day and another the next. Finally, we must accommodate those with injuries preventing them from bending down or those who the act of collecting split cylinders triggers some kind of morbid fear (aversion to floors, dirt or maybe some buried unpleasant memory).

                      Having said all that is not like a BIG THING and should, in any normal situation be talked through. You seem to think (or perhaps I am inferring) that this would not be a successful strategy? Perhaps because of the close 'men working with men' culture you have going on which has its joys but also means asking people to do things outside of work hierachies doesn't always work, because of that jostling happy mucking about ape thing male groups tend to develop. So you could go the notice route and then just ride out being fingered by the 8 (again, apologies). Or you could follow your entrapment plan, but then with such an intimate environment, this might be a little intense for everyone, and actually a lot of work for you. It also may lead to exactly the kind of situation you want to avoid— identifying a suspect and then having to confront him, one on one, over it, which may not work out:

                      "Geoff, umm, I'd like a word about the cylinders in the toilets."
                      "What on earth are you talking about candiman"
                      "The cylinders in the toilet, you know the ones that split. You don't pick them up."
                      "...err..."
                      "The cylinders, they split when they've run out of paper. You shouldn't leave them on the floor. It's irritating and a health and safety hazard."

                      By which I mean that identifying a culprit doesn't actually solve some of the wider issues you have here. And furthermore, it doesn't preclude there being more than one cylinder leaver. What if all 8 were cylinder leavers? What if, in fact, you were in a minority of five that always pick the cylinder up? That would introduce some interesting questions about democracy and the use of space.

                      You could, yourself, a) chose not to see it as a problem or thing anymore and 'get over it' or b) accept that what goes on in cubicles goes on in cubicles and resign yourself to picking up the split cylinders whenever you come across them (which, pending update, is your current course of action). But then there is the potential of harm, which you have voiced, of someone seriously hurting themselves after falling and hitting their head on a cistern or sink in what I imagine is quite a tight, enclosed space.

                      Thinking this through, however, I don't see why you don't ask the Health & Safety guy to take on you responsibility? It is after all what he is paid to do. Indeed, it's quite illuminating that he hasn't taken this on. Is this kind of health and safety beneath him? Or is this something to do with the jostling happy mucking about ape thing that (I think) may lie at the heart of the problem (ie this is precisely about the delicate balance between split cylinders rolling about on the floor endangering necks on one side of the seesaw and maintaining a kind of fictional male tribe of jostling friendliness where 'having to do things' outside of the agreed purpose of whatever your work is about is ignored on the other side of the see saw). IF SO, I suggest you suggest to your as you put it elf & safety man that he simply replaces the whole toilet roll system and you just have a big bag of 24 deluxe Andrez rolls in there (or cheaper ones if you will) and that completely removes the problem.

                      If that, for whatever reason, is not an option (do you wholly trust the elf & safety man?), then I suggest you slowly develop a cultural taboo. Given the by now established delicate social balance of the group of men thing (where saying something outright and expecting everyone to comply isn't simply an issue of health and safety at all but rather a negotiation of (laregley masculine) power and identity—I'd be interested to know whether I have this right btw), you instead gradually and slowly address the problematic behaviour by culturally engineering a belief held firmly amongst the group that leaving the cylinders rolling about on the floor is not dangerous, but dirty. And not dirty in a messy way, but dirty in a filthy way, in a forbidden madness disease 'don't eat shit' way. You need to root this belief quite deeply in the group, and I would do it subtly, by use of metaphors and ellipitcial talk about things that look like cylinders, connecting them to unpleasant behaviour or consequences.

                      Perhaps you could tell a story—for example—about a nervous old teacher who would drop his chalk on the floor, at the end of every lesson, as a kind of final act and leave the chalk there, split in half. And he'd do this at the end of lesson without fail, almost as a triumphant gesture that he'd completed a lesson and it was a thing that some students kind of liked—a quirk, an eccentricty—but you always saw it as a sign of weakness, a sign that he was just about holding on. Then one day he was acting really fraught for the whole lesson, close to the edge, so much so that some of the students laid off the constant jostling and remarks at the back of the class, just because they recognised that something had shifted. Anyway, when he finally reached the end of the lesson and dropped his chalk, this white cylinder, and it split on the floor, he looked out at the class, face blank. There was silence. He just looked out, dribbling and then slowly performed the action again, throwing another cylinder of chalk on to the floor, like a trained ape. Again and again. And you remember stepping up and saying, 'Sir, Jenkins, are you okey Sir? Perhaps you should stop splitting chalk on the floor Sir' to which he didn't reply but just lay down on the pile of split chalk cylinders and vomited. Eventually, after the headmaster was called and you think an actual ambulance came, he was taken from the school and just dissapeared, and you had a new teacher the next week, and can only assume Jenkins went mad and was institutionalised for the rest of his life. You even heard that nurses had to wipe his own arse.

                      Try that?
                      Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

                      Comment


                      • *with apologies to David Foster Wallace and thanks to candiman for supporting my work avoidance.
                        Spirit Duplicator—collectable, charming, affordable... and also socially networked on FB / Twitter / Instagram.

                        Comment


                        • Don't forget 'amazing', seems to get used a lot these days by the middle class yummy mummies brigade!

                          Originally posted by candiman View Post
                          "like" - yes over-used , especially by the kids.

                          "awesome" - also a pain. It used to be that everything was simply great:

                          Mark GV Taylor

                          https://www.facebook.com/referencepointlondon

                          Comment


                          • Whenever in a busy transport hub, especially here in London (rail, bus, tube or airport), the fact that those damn small sized trolley suitcases that everybody nowadays pulls behind them!!!

                            They take up the space of at least two people, and far too often you almost fall over the bloody things, not to mention people just suddenly changing direction and moving straight across you with the cases so that you almost go head over heels if you don't have your wits about you! Practical design in terms of ease of carriage for the case owner, just not for all the folks behind them...
                            Mark GV Taylor

                            https://www.facebook.com/referencepointlondon

                            Comment


                            • I'm finding the whole Mother's Day thing increasingly annoying

                              No disrespect to all you mothers out there but I don't like being called a mother even if it is in the context of a 'humourous' card
                              "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

                              Night of the Living Vinyl

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by eine View Post
                                Certainly a situation over there candiman.

                                Could be just a single culprit or more than one (working separately one would imagine, not together). There may even be 'unknown perpetrators' amongst you (ie people on whose watch the cylinder has not yet split, so we just don't know how they would react). We also have to consider that some people are oblivious, so focused on the task in hand they don't notice the larger consequences of their actions. We also have to remember that people are not always predictable and can do one thing one day and another the next. Finally, we must accommodate those with injuries preventing them from bending down or those who the act of collecting split cylinders triggers some kind of morbid fear (aversion to floors, dirt or maybe some buried unpleasant memory).

                                Having said all that is not like a BIG THING and should, in any normal situation be talked through. You seem to think (or perhaps I am inferring) that this would not be a successful strategy? Perhaps because of the close 'men working with men' culture you have going on which has its joys but also means asking people to do things outside of work hierachies doesn't always work, because of that jostling happy mucking about ape thing male groups tend to develop. So you could go the notice route and then just ride out being fingered by the 8 (again, apologies). Or you could follow your entrapment plan, but then with such an intimate environment, this might be a little intense for everyone, and actually a lot of work for you. It also may lead to exactly the kind of situation you want to avoid— identifying a suspect and then having to confront him, one on one, over it, which may not work out:

                                "Geoff, umm, I'd like a word about the cylinders in the toilets."
                                "What on earth are you talking about candiman"
                                "The cylinders in the toilet, you know the ones that split. You don't pick them up."
                                "...err..."
                                "The cylinders, they split when they've run out of paper. You shouldn't leave them on the floor. It's irritating and a health and safety hazard."

                                By which I mean that identifying a culprit doesn't actually solve some of the wider issues you have here. And furthermore, it doesn't preclude there being more than one cylinder leaver. What if all 8 were cylinder leavers? What if, in fact, you were in a minority of five that always pick the cylinder up? That would introduce some interesting questions about democracy and the use of space.

                                You could, yourself, a) chose not to see it as a problem or thing anymore and 'get over it' or b) accept that what goes on in cubicles goes on in cubicles and resign yourself to picking up the split cylinders whenever you come across them (which, pending update, is your current course of action). But then there is the potential of harm, which you have voiced, of someone seriously hurting themselves after falling and hitting their head on a cistern or sink in what I imagine is quite a tight, enclosed space.

                                Thinking this through, however, I don't see why you don't ask the Health & Safety guy to take on you responsibility? It is after all what he is paid to do. Indeed, it's quite illuminating that he hasn't taken this on. Is this kind of health and safety beneath him? Or is this something to do with the jostling happy mucking about ape thing that (I think) may lie at the heart of the problem (ie this is precisely about the delicate balance between split cylinders rolling about on the floor endangering necks on one side of the seesaw and maintaining a kind of fictional male tribe of jostling friendliness where 'having to do things' outside of the agreed purpose of whatever your work is about is ignored on the other side of the see saw). IF SO, I suggest you suggest to your as you put it elf & safety man that he simply replaces the whole toilet roll system and you just have a big bag of 24 deluxe Andrez rolls in there (or cheaper ones if you will) and that completely removes the problem.

                                If that, for whatever reason, is not an option (do you wholly trust the elf & safety man?), then I suggest you slowly develop a cultural taboo. Given the by now established delicate social balance of the group of men thing (where saying something outright and expecting everyone to comply isn't simply an issue of health and safety at all but rather a negotiation of (laregley masculine) power and identity—I'd be interested to know whether I have this right btw), you instead gradually and slowly address the problematic behaviour by culturally engineering a belief held firmly amongst the group that leaving the cylinders rolling about on the floor is not dangerous, but dirty. And not dirty in a messy way, but dirty in a filthy way, in a forbidden madness disease 'don't eat shit' way. You need to root this belief quite deeply in the group, and I would do it subtly, by use of metaphors and ellipitcial talk about things that look like cylinders, connecting them to unpleasant behaviour or consequences.

                                Perhaps you could tell a story—for example—about a nervous old teacher who would drop his chalk on the floor, at the end of every lesson, as a kind of final act and leave the chalk there, split in half. And he'd do this at the end of lesson without fail, almost as a triumphant gesture that he'd completed a lesson and it was a thing that some students kind of liked—a quirk, an eccentricty—but you always saw it as a sign of weakness, a sign that he was just about holding on. Then one day he was acting really fraught for the whole lesson, close to the edge, so much so that some of the students laid off the constant jostling and remarks at the back of the class, just because they recognised that something had shifted. Anyway, when he finally reached the end of the lesson and dropped his chalk, this white cylinder, and it split on the floor, he looked out at the class, face blank. There was silence. He just looked out, dribbling and then slowly performed the action again, throwing another cylinder of chalk on to the floor, like a trained ape. Again and again. And you remember stepping up and saying, 'Sir, Jenkins, are you okey Sir? Perhaps you should stop splitting chalk on the floor Sir' to which he didn't reply but just lay down on the pile of split chalk cylinders and vomited. Eventually, after the headmaster was called and you think an actual ambulance came, he was taken from the school and just dissapeared, and you had a new teacher the next week, and can only assume Jenkins went mad and was institutionalised for the rest of his life. You even heard that nurses had to wipe his own arse.

                                Try that?
                                I'm going to have to sit down and think on this very carefully. I know the perfect place!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X