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  • Not mint, but pretty good. Yes, the biro, damn you J Castiau! think I might be knocking $990.00 off for that.

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    • Lol, still well done mate, definitely a sought after records among classical collectors by the looks.
      Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

      Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

      Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

      Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

      Comment


      • Not checked these out yet or indeed listened but I doubt I'll beat yours Benny but here's four from the last couple of weeks:

        [IMG][/IMG]
        Last edited by amidar; 09-12-2015, 05:51 PM. Reason: four not three!
        Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

        Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

        Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

        Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

        Comment


        • Your Bach has such an unassuming cover Benny. Congrats.

          I might just nip out now and go back quickly to the State Library's record sale. If you will excuse me...



          [Door slams. Tyres screech]

          Comment


          • Originally posted by bennyboy View Post
            Blimey.
            Blimey indeed, Mr Bennyboy. Now I'm very happy for you and all, but of course the problem with posts like this, showing relatively unassuming looking albums that turn out to be worth a heap, is that it starts off that horrible nagging feeling inside....and then the questions begin....didn't I see one just like this the other week?....was it in the Cancer Research Shop or the Age Concern?..... I was given a free run at a fairly huge and exotic classical collection the other week and now I could swear there were at least a dozen like that amongst it all, although this is probably just my mind playing tricks. Unfortunately, being a relative greenhorn in the classical buying field I didn't really have a clue what I was looking at, but I don't think I came away with anything worth more than five or six quid.....but hey, that isn't the point is it?...anyhow we shall return to that episode later , in the meantime back to matters musical.....and this time it's Mozart......



            Humour In Music - 18th Century Style (Turnabout)
            W.A. Mozart - 'A Musical Joke (K.522)'
            Leopold Mozart - 'Toy Symphony'/'Musical Sleigh Ride'


            Well that cutesy sleeve had 'festive season' written all over it, and I couldn't resist....yes, yes, I know, not the best place to start your Mozart studies, but there's sometimes a certain value in the 'things can only get better' school of blind optimism - and anyway the warning was writ large - it's a musical joke...we're back in the 1780s and Mozart is busy busy busy and at the height of his powers, beavering away on more serious works but still finding time to knock out the odd little divertissement like this...I'll be honest; most of this joke was over my head - I mean I got the formula string sawing and only an oaf could miss the off key horns, but I was still frustrated - clearly this is a kind of pastiche, but of what exactly? The sleeve notes give no clues; 'there is no evidence that he was satirizing any composer in particular'....

            Mozart senior was an occasional visitor in these Vienna years and probably found himself rather getting under the feet of his son. On side two we hear his 'Toy Symphony' (originally attributed to Haydn) and 'Musical Sleigh Ride'. Being kind, we could say that the works are innovative in their use of toy trumpets, cuckoo noises and general mechanical rattlings - but to my ears these things merely add an extra irritating layer to music that is already stiff, formal and conventional - exactly the sort of thing that a younger generation might send up in a pastiche....ahhhh!!!! But enough of this frippery....



            W.A. Mozart- 'Piano Concerto No.22 in E flat Major, K.482'/'Rondo in D Major for Piano and Orchestra, K.382' (Turnabout)

            ....here's Alfred Brendel with the Vienna Chamber and Pro-Musica Orchestras in tow, just in time to save the day! I'm warming more and more to Brendel the more I listen. I finally copped his 90's recording of Beethoven's 'Waldstein' on CD and the earlier Beethoven 'Variations & Vignettes' on Turnabout (including 'Rule Britannia' and 'God Save The King') had me digging stuff I never thought I'd be into. I even watched a documentary about him and liked him so much I want a Brendel T-Shirt....so how would I get on with him playing Mozart in an orchestral setting?

            Well, just gradely in fact. This concerto is quite a showy piece, with the orchestra nicely framing the piano, and relatively little interplay between the two. There's a sort of fanfare style intro that allows the piano to come in in a suitably grand manner and Brendel's talent for 'feel' keeps it virtuoso without ever getting too flashy - this I think is his main strength. The Allegro maintains a brash and confident swagger throughout. The Andante is a little more melancholy than you might expect and it's all very neatly taken home on side two. An unexpected bonus comes with the Rondo - if I felt I had been robbed of a good Christmas record by Mozart Senior's 'Toy Symphony', this more than makes up for it - hell, suddenly I can even hear the roots of Jona Lewie's 'Stop The Cavalry' in this....
            you can hear colours when they rhyme...

            Comment


            • Robert Parris – “The Book of Imaginary Beings”. For Flute, Violin, Cello, Piano, Celeste and Percussion. (1973 Turrnabout). Ex+/Ex+. $2

              I mentioned this some time back.

              The title is a lift from Borges. I tried to read a translation once and got tired of it very quickly. Strangely, I can’t find the Penguin Borges that I did like.

              Parris teases in his liner notes on the relationship between music and text. There are some pronounced clip-clop sounds in “A King of Fire and His Steed”. And yet Parris says to those who “hear…a horse’s hooves in [it] I can only say that I am astonished”. The drums in “A Bao A Qu” derive “from the beating in my clogged ears during a bad cold”. But then, “the siren-call in [“Sirens”] is clear even to me”. All very cute, but what is the point of trying to use music to illustrate imaginary beings? Probably it is almost placebo-like. Prompt the listener into discerning coherence and commonalities where there otherwise wouldn’t be any.

              Having listened on-and-off for several months I can say the following.

              “Amphisbaena” is a short torrent of percussion, strings and what-have-you, and is the first of the eight pieces. It succeeds by sheer momentum, if nothing else. “Amphisbaena Retroversa” is the same music in reverse and it comes at the end. Nice idea. If I ever use them in a mix I’ll reverse the order, just to be contrary.

              Having the steady drumbeat so quiet in “A Bao A Qu” is a neat trick. Every time I listen it is the drums that hold my attention.

              Parris set a fairly high bar for himself by calling a piece “Sirens”: whatever Ulysses heard must have been very compelling. What Parris gives us is conventionally pretty. Not boat-crashingly attractive - but then what would be?

              Worth $2, especially in a charitable context.

              Look, it is there on Youtube!

              Side 2 has Robert Evatt’s “Quintet for Piano and Strings”. This was premiered in 1954, and must have sounded conventional even then. Evatt says that the piece “is not music of consuming technical interest or intellectual appeal”. You have to wonder if he didn’t think that he had done better since.
              Last edited by Grim Lounge Cowboy; 27-12-2015, 09:51 AM. Reason: Look...

              Comment


              • Pierre Boulez has died.

                Gutted.

                BBC

                Comment


                • Late last year I was looking through the records in a charity shop - same old stuff from last time I was there, lots of Jim Reeves and Jimmy Shand. I was about to leave when an assistant tapped me on the shoulder; 'Oh, are you into records? We've got a load more downstairs.' I offered to have a look, but he insisted on bringing them up and within minutes had reappeared with a great big massive double armful....and then another....and then another....and another....

                  Most of them were classical, but it was clear that this was no ordinary collection - this was eye-popping stuff, luxurious leather bound editions, 78s in carry cases, box sets, booklets, dowel spines, sleeves and dealer stickers from every period post-war and from all over the world, including a good deal of French and South American records. And who was there to sift through these treasures on behalf of VG+? Yes, yours truly, Mr Classical dilletante himself.....DOH!!!!

                  At 50p a slice, it would have been very easy to go completely mad and bag anything that looked remotely interesting - I even considered putting in an offer for the lot, but where would I put them and what would I do with them? I've barely even sold a record in my life and since someone had obviously spent a lifetime putting this collection together, it seemed disrespectful. One day, I thought soberly, this could be my collection. Or yours.

                  So, with mixed feelings, I dug in, conscious that I had about an hour before I had a prior engagement. I probably flicked past several highly collectible albums, but what can you do? If any more classical savvy collectors than I came by afterwards, they were going to hit paydirt, so I stuck to anything a) I was actually interested in and b) the odd thing that I thought might be worth a bob or two. I didn't leave with many at all, not even a dozen, none of which, as far as I can tell are worth much more than a five-spot anyway.

                  I've revisited the shop and noticed that they're slowly starting to get put out week by week, so I'll keep an eye out, but in the meantime, just to illustrate my lifelong ability (as an old mate put it) to 'fall into a barrel of t*ts and come out sucking my thumb' let's start with this;



                  Brahms- 'Symphony No.1 in C.Minor' (London Philharmonic Orchestra - Sir Adrian Boult)

                  It's a German issue. It's on the serious looking 'Europa' label. It has an arty sleeve that looks a bit like stained plant cells under a microscope. It's Sir Adrian Boult and ....The London Philharmonic Orchestra?....hold on a minute, isn't that the lot that did all those 'Sounds Astounding' type albums on Stereo Gold Award?

                  Yes it is. And for the second time this thread we're touched by the hand of Leo Muller. Not that I imagine he had too much to do with this. It's in a very woolly sort of stereo, perhaps a repackaging of Boult's 1961 recording? You guys would know better than I.

                  It's the first movement. Brahms is bloody angry. He's on the lawn outside your house, brandishing a pistol wildly and shouting a lot. But on more than one occasion he is stung by doubt, swallows his words and ends up just threatening you with a letter from his solicitor that will require you to fill in a complicated form. What was it Chekhov said? 'Never put a loaded revolver on the stage unless you intend to use it'. Should have listened, Johannes...

                  Second movement. Brahms is down by the sea watching the waves swell and ebb, embarrassed by his ineffectiveness. For a while he considers throwing himself off the cliff, but something on the horizon gives him hope and in his head he starts to form a nascent melody - which sounds rather like Mozart. He goes home.

                  Third movement - it's a new day, with new possibilities. He eats a hearty breakfast and dances with the maid. But as he is about to spring into action, he is filled by sudden indecision. He hasn't thought this through.

                  Fourth movement. Night has fallen and Brahms emerges from the darkness, sneaking round your garden, piercing eggs with a needle and hiding them under your windows. Where the window is open he considers stitching anchovies into the hem of your curtains, but thinks better of it. Suddenly, drama!...he hasn't planned his escape!

                  A tortuous period ensues where he cannot for the love of god find a taxi. Eventually wandering into town he finds a bus. At last he can relax and for the first time we begin to hear a recognisable melody, which is not bad, but not as memorable as, say, his third symphony will be. As the credits roll he hastily contrives a dramatic theme on which to end. He's pretty good on the power chords, but other than that it's a little aimless and overstays it's welcome.

                  More to come soon...
                  you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
                    Late last year I was looking through the records in a charity shop - same old stuff from last time I was there, lots of Jim Reeves and Jimmy Shand. I was about to leave when an assistant tapped me on the shoulder; 'Oh, are you into records? We've got a load more downstairs.' I offered to have a look, but he insisted on bringing them up and within minutes had reappeared with a great big massive double armful....and then another....and then another....and another....

                    Most of them were classical, but it was clear that this was no ordinary collection - this was eye-popping stuff, luxurious leather bound editions, 78s in carry cases, box sets, booklets, dowel spines, sleeves and dealer stickers from every period post-war and from all over the world, including a good deal of French and South American records. And who was there to sift through these treasures on behalf of VG+? Yes, yours truly, Mr Classical dilletante himself.....DOH!!!!

                    At 50p a slice, it would have been very easy to go completely mad and bag anything that looked remotely interesting - I even considered putting in an offer for the lot, but where would I put them and what would I do with them? I've barely even sold a record in my life and since someone had obviously spent a lifetime putting this collection together, it seemed disrespectful. One day, I thought soberly, this could be my collection. Or yours.

                    So, with mixed feelings, I dug in, conscious that I had about an hour before I had a prior engagement. I probably flicked past several highly collectible albums, but what can you do? If any more classical savvy collectors than I came by afterwards, they were going to hit paydirt, so I stuck to anything a) I was actually interested in and b) the odd thing that I thought might be worth a bob or two. I didn't leave with many at all, not even a dozen, none of which, as far as I can tell are worth much more than a five-spot anyway.

                    I've revisited the shop and noticed that they're slowly starting to get put out week by week, so I'll keep an eye out, but in the meantime, just to illustrate my lifelong ability (as an old mate put it) to 'fall into a barrel of t*ts and come out sucking my thumb' let's start with this;



                    Brahms- 'Symphony No.1 in C.Minor' (London Philharmonic Orchestra - Sir Adrian Boult)

                    It's a German issue. It's on the serious looking 'Europa' label. It has an arty sleeve that looks a bit like stained plant cells under a microscope. It's Sir Adrian Boult and ....The London Philharmonic Orchestra?....hold on a minute, isn't that the lot that did all those 'Sounds Astounding' type albums on Stereo Gold Award?

                    Yes it is. And for the second time this thread we're touched by the hand of Leo Muller. Not that I imagine he had too much to do with this. It's in a very woolly sort of stereo, perhaps a repackaging of Boult's 1961 recording? You guys would know better than I.

                    It's the first movement. Brahms is bloody angry. He's on the lawn outside your house, brandishing a pistol wildly and shouting a lot. But on more than one occasion he is stung by doubt, swallows his words and ends up just threatening you with a letter from his solicitor that will require you to fill in a complicated form. What was it Chekhov said? 'Never put a loaded revolver on the stage unless you intend to use it'. Should have listened, Johannes...

                    Second movement. Brahms is down by the sea watching the waves swell and ebb, embarrassed by his ineffectiveness. For a while he considers throwing himself off the cliff, but something on the horizon gives him hope and in his head he starts to form a nascent melody - which sounds rather like Mozart. He goes home.

                    Third movement - it's a new day, with new possibilities. He eats a hearty breakfast and dances with the maid. But as he is about to spring into action, he is filled by sudden indecision. He hasn't thought this through.

                    Fourth movement. Night has fallen and Brahms emerges from the darkness, sneaking round your garden, piercing eggs with a needle and hiding them under your windows. Where the window is open he considers stitching anchovies into the hem of your curtains, but thinks better of it. Suddenly, drama!...he hasn't planned his escape!

                    A tortuous period ensues where he cannot for the love of god find a taxi. Eventually wandering into town he finds a bus. At last he can relax and for the first time we begin to hear a recognisable melody, which is not bad, but not as memorable as, say, his third symphony will be. As the credits roll he hastily contrives a dramatic theme on which to end. He's pretty good on the power chords, but other than that it's a little aimless and overstays it's welcome.

                    More to come soon...
                    Are you at a loose end Giant Chicken?
                    "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Shere Khan View Post
                      Are you at a loose end Giant Chicken?
                      Hell no. I'm very busy.....doing nothing.....
                      you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
                        Hell no. I'm very busy.....doing nothing.....
                        And I know that's not as easy as it sounds.
                        "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Shere Khan View Post
                          And I know that's not as easy as it sounds.
                          Well, I had the day off. A somewhat impressionistic review I admit. I suppose what I was trying to say is that Brahms rather bottled it. For a work that took, by his own admission, over 20 years to compose, it's a bit of a dog's dinner. Mind you, that was 20 years of him being mooted as the new Beethoven with commentators already calling it 'Beethoven's Tenth' before they'd even heard it. That's some pressure....
                          you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
                            that was 20 years of him being mooted as the new Beethoven with commentators already calling it 'Beethoven's Tenth' before they'd even heard it. That's some pressure....
                            Isn't that the problem with Brahms; he's not Beethoven? I've never really got with him. There are a few bits I like but I tend to think of him as a bit ponderous. If it took over twenty years he's making My Bloody Valentine look like a bunch of 'In,out, bish-bash-bosh there's your LP' merchants.
                            "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

                            Comment


                            • To this day I still can't listen to Brahms. Maybe we are spoilt, as we have instant access to allsorts.
                              Perhaps back in the day going to see Brahms rockin' da joint was well wicked. Time and place and all of that...
                              some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by medlar View Post
                                To this day I still can't listen to Brahms. Maybe we are spoilt, as we have instant access to allsorts.
                                Perhaps back in the day going to see Brahms rockin' da joint was well wicked. Time and place and all of that...
                                Maybe but it sounds like it was, "Hey, coming to see Brahms new thing"? "Too right; when"? "About 20 years time, and it probably won't be much cop, either"
                                Anyone see the Boulez programme on BBC 4 a few days ago? Very good. The film of the crockery being smashed in the Ligeti piece at The Roundhouse was priceless. Old Pierre may have been committed to advancing the cause of modern music but he had no truck with modern hairstyles; he had a comb-over pretty much from day one until he died.
                                "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

                                Comment

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