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  • Good find, Skip - 'the osprey of violinists'? - well I'll have to take your word for it unless I find one...So is it one of those four-figure examples then? There's a lot of Kogan records - surely they can't all be worth a mint - isn't a lot of it down to the analogue goodness or otherwise?

    Mind you, aren't Saga supposed to specialise in providing holidays for the over 50's? - having looked at their website one time, I concluded I'd need a few four figure finds before I could go and look at the ruins of Troy...
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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    • No I think this particular LP is worth roughly the pound that I paid for it. Even in minty condition (which classical LPs have to be to be worth anything on the collectors market) it wouldn't be worth too much. I have a bit of an idea of what to look for with classical vinyl - labels, artists, catalogue IDs etc so that if I do see anything interesting I can pull out the smartphone and have a look. This ticked the Kogan box but none of the others.

      That said he is a charity shop rarity. You're much more likely to see David Oistrakh or Yehudi Menuhin LPs. I've had Kogan on my look out for list for ages without any cropping up. I bought it entirely out of interest.

      I have to say that while his playing is definitely exciting it's not really for me and will probably be released back into the wild. It's all a bit too Russian for my taste and that's before the fact he's playing Tchaikovsky.

      I'm starting to develop a taste in classical music and exposure to this sort of thing all helps. Ultimately I'll probably steer away from Virtuoso violinists and pianists because I think you probably need an appreciation of the instrument to appreciate the music. I liken it to technical maestros like Joe Satriani and Steve Vai - I've known guitarists who revere their work but to me much of it sounds like soulless noodling. I know enough to understand that the soul is in the playing and that I have cloth ears for that breed of guitarist.

      My explorations are leading me in the direction of English classical at the moment and I have found a few keepers this month


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      • Originally posted by Skip View Post
        Ultimately I'll probably steer away from Virtuoso violinists and pianists because I think you probably need an appreciation of the instrument to appreciate the music.
        Being able to play the instrument in question certainly endows a deeper understanding and appreciation of the skills being displayed.

        That said, unsurprisingly, many of the best recordings are by the best musicians. Avoiding them potentially sends you cruising into the realms of mediocrity.

        This is uber virtuoso Jascha Heifetz. I think he's totally approachable, see what you think?

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        • Originally posted by Xann View Post
          That said, unsurprisingly, many of the best recordings are by the best musicians. Avoiding them potentially sends you cruising into the realms of mediocrity.
          No I won't be avoiding them. I'm definitely leaning towards small groups and soloists in favour of full orchestral performances.
          I picked up this solo viola LP this month too and it's very rewarding.




          I'm not sure what it is that I don't connect with on the Kogan LP. It's all a learning journey.

          Many thanks for the link to the Heifetz performance, I did enjoy it.

          My first genuine connection with classical music came from hearing the composer Josef Suk played by the violinist Josef Suk. You might say it's what Suk'd me in
          Last edited by Skip; 31-03-2016, 11:13 AM. Reason: Thanks

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          • The other day at the library sale I noticed that there were a number of albums by Hans Werner Henze. Which to choose?

            I decided upon “The Tedious Way to the Place of Natascha Ungeheuer”.

            So, what have we got here? Schoenbergian Sprechgesang – check. Taped interludes – check. Improvised sections – check. Free Jazz group – check. Other orchestral elements each symbolising some participant in or aspect of the class struggle – check. Car parts serving as instruments – check. Bananas agitprop libretto – check.

            Henze has a poke at the avant-garde in his sleeve notes. So, I suppose that deploying the full armoury of the avant-garde might be some sort of exercise in Marxist dialectics.

            One listen. Never again. It has almost nothing going for it - the vocals being the deal-breaker.

            I propose that we each acquire an album by this guy and meet up at Giant Chicken’s place for a Henze night. I’ll bring Don Cooper as a palate cleanser.

            The good news is that when I picked this up I also picked up something that I like. I hope to say a bit about that quite soon.

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            • Got bits by Henze.

              Like this one.

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              • Originally posted by Funktionnaire View Post
                The other day at the library sale I noticed that there were a number of albums by Hans Werner Henze. Which to choose?

                I decided upon “The Tedious Way to the Place of Natascha Ungeheuer”.

                So, what have we got here? Schoenbergian Sprechgesang – check. Taped interludes – check. Improvised sections – check. Free Jazz group – check. Other orchestral elements each symbolising some participant in or aspect of the class struggle – check. Car parts serving as instruments – check. Bananas agitprop libretto – check.

                Henze has a poke at the avant-garde in his sleeve notes. So, I suppose that deploying the full armoury of the avant-garde might be some sort of exercise in Marxist dialectics.

                One listen. Never again. It has almost nothing going for it - the vocals being the deal-breaker.

                I propose that we each acquire an album by this guy and meet up at Giant Chicken’s place for a Henze night. I’ll bring Don Cooper as a palate cleanser.

                The good news is that when I picked this up I also picked up something that I like. I hope to say a bit about that quite soon.
                I'd recommend giving his autobiography 'Bohemian Fifths' a go. It's a good read, and he can be quite camp. As for his music the String Quartets and his music for guitar float my boat. I know some people don't dig classical guitar (especially of a modern turn) but I listen to quite a bit.

                "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                • Originally posted by Funktionnaire View Post
                  I propose that we each acquire an album by this guy and meet up at Giant Chicken’s place for a Henze night.
                  Sounds like the only way this chicken is likely to fill his home with Henze these days.....

                  you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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                  • I hope to pop by the sale early tomorrow. Last I was there it was:

                    El Cimaron

                    Voices

                    Konzert fur Clavier und Orchester

                    And a box (symphonies?).

                    Suggestions?

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                    • I'd go for the piano concerto, but you're different aintcha?

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                      • Take the box! Take the box!

                        It is unusual for me to like vocal music. So, I am wary about "Voices". Somehow I also formed the impression that El C was voice-heavy. "Natascha Ungeheuer" clearly had a vocal component, but I was swayed by the mention of the jazz and the perc-guy (whose name escapes me for now - Stomu???). Also I like the name "Natascha".

                        Piano Concerto had a striking sleeve.

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                        • Stomu Yamashta? His early work is best before he went all cheesy fusion. Funnily enough if it is indeed him I have a copy of his 'Red Buddha' album on its way to me. Very talented dude!

                          Originally posted by Funktionnaire View Post
                          Take the box! Take the box!

                          It is unusual for me to like vocal music. So, I am wary about "Voices". Somehow I also formed the impression that El C was voice-heavy. "Natascha Ungeheuer" clearly had a vocal component, but I was swayed by the mention of the jazz and the perc-guy (whose name escapes me for now - Stomu???). Also I like the name "Natascha".

                          Piano Concerto had a striking sleeve.
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                          • Originally posted by Funktionnaire View Post
                            Take the box! Take the box!
                            What is it? Who is it?

                            You have masochistic tendencies.

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                            • Here's a classical LP I picked up today:


                              Nothing special in terms of collectibility but it's my third Dinu Lipatti LP. I'm over familiar with Grieg's piano concerto but the Schumann concerto is excellent and I'm happy.

                              He's a wonderful pianist. I can't describe what it is that I love so much. There's a purity and warmth that I don't find in a lot of piano music (to the extent I tend to steer clear). He died tragically young at 33. Here's his last recital which starts with Bach's keyboard Partita #1. I can put this on and forget myself completely.

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                              • Lipatti is a great player, and you're not the only VG+er that's been known to partake - Medlar's partial too, iirc?

                                Lipatti was taught by Alfred Cortot. He's also worth checking out, though obviously many of the finest performances aren't Hi Fi recordings.

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