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  • What's the Gerhard piece on that one GLC?

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    • Libra

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      • A couple of weeks ago, I picked up this (https://www.discogs.com/Luciano-Beri...lease/12189593) from a bargain bin. Finally got around to listening to it on Saturday night. Absolutely exactly the kind of thing I was wanting to listen to. Cathy Berberian's vocal gymnastics utterly compelling and very very odd.
        "White paper inner sleeve is pristine ..."

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        • Oxfam in Reading delivers on the 'Dutch avant-classical' front! I'll never see the Van Bergiijk and Van Vlijman here. The VB barrel organ track sounds promising.

          Also on the late 60's Oz classical front with the Richard Meale. "Soon it will die" apparently from the same time as "Clouds Now and Then", and also Haiku inspired.

          I won the Gaudeamus Quartet LP on Ebay for next to nothing. G4 my go-to string quartet for Dutch avant-classical SQ action.

          Many thanks to Bongolia for the other two, which were surprise companions for the Jolivet freebie he had going a while back.

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            Argenta, London Symphony Orchestra - España (4 Spanish themed pieces - Chabrier - España, Rimsky-Korsakov - Capriccio Espagnol, etc)

            Was in a junk shop yesterday, a few new classical LPs in, and about the second record I pulled out of the box was this pretty clean first pressing, original inner and everything. Not bad for 50p, although I need to work out if I can remove the plastic sleeve (it's glued on the inside) - any tips on doing that welcomed!

            Also a couple of white/gold HMVs - The Planets and Scheherazade, not particularly valuable but nice to find in well looked after condition. With Peer Gynt (not worth much either, takes my total to 3). Disappointingly tasteful sleeve on the Scheherazade - it's normally a chance for record companies to feature scantily clad women. I'm sure there is or was a gallery online somewhere of hundreds of Scheherazade sleeves in all their middle-east exploito splendour

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            • Originally posted by Grim Lounge Cowboy View Post
              Looking again at what you wrote it seems that you will be giving it the elbow.
              Sorry, forgot to reply to this the other month - seems the Maisky Bach box is sought after, presumably in South Korea (it even apparently had a vinyl reissue there recently). Still not had a chance (or remembered) to give it a proper listen yet.

              Coincidently my Casals box was 35p (reduced from 70p in a half-price sale) at another branch of the same charity shop about 15 years ago. I shall now be disappointed not to find another recording of them for 15p sometime in 2033 (fingers crossed for the Janos Starker with the spooky floating head B&W cover: https://www.discogs.com/Johann-Sebas...elease/4154889 )

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              • Van Bergiijk and Van Vlijman have left the building! The VV tracks made no impression. The VB tracks made a negative impression - esp the barrel organ track. Perhaps check them on Youtube if you have discovered that you don't happen to share my tastes in such matters.

                Sale of them to a local dude generated $20. That went towards an as-yet-uncompleted purchase which might feature on-site shortly.

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                • Penderecki's score for the 1964 film 'Painters Of Gdansk' is brilliant.

                  It starts and ends like a very stoned Jacques Loussier, the middle comprises of nods to Romantic classical, 60s soundtracks (duh) and some hefty slabs of concrète.

                  POG was a short film showcasing the art scene in Poland, it's not difficult to imagine what sort of images would have accompanied these sounds.

                  The piece would sit quite happily in the catalogues of Trunk or Finders Keepers, though they'd have to find a coupling as it's only 20 minutes long

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                  • I've had my eye on this for a while, primarily for Raxach's "Imaginary Landscape"; a satisfying nine minutes of undemonstrative flute against a sympathetic percussive backdrop. Music for scenery. If it has a flaw it might be what sounds like an attempt at a climax at the end. But then I suppose he had to give it a sense of an ending.

                    There is live take of IL on Youtube, done with a shade more feeling.

                    I may try to edit out the baritone vocals from Will Eisma's "Le Gibet". The instrumental passages reflect his studies with some of the big names of the 60's. But they are done with restraint and remain accessible.

                    Less restraint from Eisma in "Little Lane" when, fairly frequently, he deploys the weight of the orchestra. Also, though, there is less accessibility. Or, rather, what there is is less engaging. Little catches my attention throughout its 13 minutes.

                    Put off by the prospect of the contralto I've not listened to Raxach's "Paraphrase". I also wonder how a work of 16 minutes gets called "Paraphrase". No clues in the liner notes.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Grim Lounge Cowboy; 27-08-2019, 01:39 PM. Reason: Editing

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                    • Originally posted by Grim Lounge Cowboy View Post
                      There is live take of IL on Youtube, done with a shade more feeling.
                      Digging that.
                      "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                      • Originally posted by Grim Lounge Cowboy View Post
                        I've had my eye on this for a while, primarily for Raxach's "Imaginary Landscape";
                        Love the jacket design.

                        "White paper inner sleeve is pristine ..."

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                        • The jacket details aren't really visible in the photo. One side of the gatefold has two booklets attached for sleeve notes (Dutch and English).

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                          • More Dutch contemporary (circa 1985) classical.

                            Let’s start with the first track by the Asko Ensemble’s (no details as to instruments, I am afraid). A performance of Flaka by Klas Torstensson.

                            My early impression of this was that, a couple of brief quiet spells aside, it was strident and haphazard. Shrill strings and horns punctuated by random obtrusive drumming. Free jazz without that genre’s token gestures towards rhythm and melody.

                            The composer’s liner notes record that he was interested in extremes.

                            I listened again yesterday at lower volume (the sleeve recommends high volume). It makes passable background music. It was no more coherent, but there were some pleasant enough moments. Not enough of them, though, given the 14 minutes that the piece runs. Passable, but no more than that.

                            Harry Sparnaay and his bass clarinet featured twice in my CD swap a year or so back. Here he impresses with Spans, a composed solo piece, again by Torsensson. Torsensson draws on Sparnaay’s commend of extended techniques. Buzzy faux electronics follow didge-like growling.

                            Sparnaay’s timing is important here too. He is deft and assured.

                            Spans skips about a bit and is fairly engaging. But what Sparnaay can’t provide is a melody. The closest we get to one is a repeated figure derived from a familiar riff in Bizet’s Carmen. But over the nine minutes it isn’t enough to lull the ear and it isn’t used enough to provide structure and consistency. If Spans had been a bit tighter it could have been very good indeed.

                            Did I mention that Sparnaay was also a part of the Asko Ensemble?

                            Next it is the Asko’s again with Pharos by Cliff Grego. This, at least, is obviously composed. And there is more restraint than in Flaka. Again, though, I can’t discern any obvious structure. It is a 14 minute thread of the sort of mild discordancies you might expect from the avant-garde. There are some effective moments, but it doesn’t work as a piece. Or that is my view until I am shown otherwise.

                            In his liner notes the composer says that the piece is a response to how the new music problematises things for the relationship between the composer and the performer. What if he had also factored in the listener?

                            Last up is Heterostase by Jan Vriend. It is played by the Het Trio; flute, piano and guess who on bass clarinet.

                            Vriend, in his notes, says he is happy with the piece and happy with the performance. Very happy. It is a career best (circa 1985).

                            The point of the piece is variation. He wrings about 250 configurations out of the three instruments. The result requires attention as there are no easy regularities to latch on to. Neither, though, is there any of the harshness that is the easy touchstone of the modern. So, attention doesn’t feel like a chore.

                            If I am keeping this it will be for the solo Sparnaay.
                            Attached Files
                            Last edited by Grim Lounge Cowboy; 05-09-2019, 11:25 AM. Reason: typos

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                              Ginette Neveu - Chausson - Poème / Debussy - Sonata In G Minor / Ravel - Tzigane

                              Was in a charity shop yesterday I don't often go to (and turns out it is closing in a few weeks time) and saw this, which, although being my thing composer-wise, I'd actually passed on 6+ months ago, because of the tatty sleeve and ex-library stamp. Bit of a surprise to look it up later on popsike... (Note to self: keep an eye out for the female violinists)


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                              • Does it merit its e-price?

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