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  • #46
    Originally posted by Xann View Post
    The D'Anglebert Lully transcriptions sound like they're your sort of thing. You could also maybe try Domenico Scarlatti who penned a small mountain of harpsichord tunes.



    I'd like to see Skip play!
    You're not wrong, Xann - tremendous stuff that...it seems I'm definitely partial to the harpsichord, but I'd better take it slow and easy....one could easily overdose, especially when the notes are arriving more quickly than the brain can process them! I'd like to see Skip play too, but it would be even better with more wigs and slap...and maybe some of those dinky little court shoes?
    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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    • #47

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      • #48
        Great thread this!



        Recently pounced on a job lot of Martinu records online. I am not a Martinu fan really - mostly I find it quite nice but no more - but there are occasional Sparks and somehow I feel there must be a masterwork or two buried in his huge output...



        ... and there were two other records in the lot that I wanted. The Nonets record basically because it had Alois Haba's Nonet No 4 on it. And the Janacek because Janacek.

        The Nonet record was pretty amazing, I ended up totally blown away by works from Jan Tausinger and Svatopluk Havelka, two composers I have never heard of before. The Janacek had a stunning piece called Fiddler's Child. All of these beautifully orchestrated.







        I also picked up this De Falla record, the Harpsichord concerto is beautifully done, there is the bonus of the alternate version for piano, and Nights In The Gardens Of Spain is wonderful as well.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Tinhat Toyboy View Post
          Thanks TT, that's a truly compelling recording....certainly gives you plenty to think about, eh?



          Originally posted by Sonovox View Post
          Great thread this!....The Nonet record was pretty amazing, I ended up totally blown away by works from Jan Tausinger and Svatopluk Havelka, two composers I have never heard of before. The Janacek had a stunning piece called Fiddler's Child. All of these beautifully orchestrated.
          Great thread indeed!....nonets?...were these deliberately composed to fit the requisite number of musicians, or did it just turn out that it required that many? Of course, you could ask the same of quartets or quintets, but nonets seems somehow even more arbitrary....it was a bit dark and slow for me t.b.h.....the Janacek had some nice melancholic passages though. You see, I am listening! Will perhaps check out the De Falla harpsichord concerto when I get some time...there's a whole lot of harpsichord music for me to discover right now!
          you can hear colours when they rhyme...

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Sonovox View Post
            ...I am not a Martinu fan really - mostly I find it quite nice but no more...
            I really quite like Martinu, for me he sits nicely in the middle of the Classical/Romantic and the spiky 20th Century works.

            You have the Symphony I listen to the most, number 6.

            The pieces I've been meaning to pick up for an age are the works inspired by Jazz, and this...





            Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
            I'd like to see Skip play too, but it would be even better with more wigs and slap...and maybe some of those dinky little court shoes?
            In keeping with the period, the concert hall should burn down during the finale

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            • #51
              Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
              Great thread indeed!....nonets?...were these deliberately composed to fit the requisite number of musicians, or did it just turn out that it required that many? Of course, you could ask the same of quartets or quintets, but nonets seems somehow even more arbitrary....it was a bit dark and slow for me t.b.h.....the Janacek had some nice melancholic passages though. You see, I am listening! Will perhaps check out the De Falla harpsichord concerto when I get some time...there's a whole lot of harpsichord music for me to discover right now!
              A nonet is typically a wind quintet and a string quartet together (with a double bass rather than a second violin). Although other groups of nine instruments are sometimes used. The Czech Nonet specializes in them, natch. I've found out it has been going since 1924 and apparently around 300 nonets have been composed specifically with it in mind. Sounds like enough to keep me busy.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Xann View Post
                I really quite like Martinu, for me he sits nicely in the middle of the Classical/Romantic and the spiky 20th Century works.

                You have the Symphony I listen to the most, number 6.
                Still haven't got round to most of it, will try that one next. I really enjoyed the Etudes & Polkas which is not normally my kind of thing.

                Martinu's Jazz Inspired Compositions is one of the first classical records I bought, long time ago, purely on the strength of the cover:

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                • #53
                  This weeks classical finds:

                  [IMG][/IMG]

                  Bruch Violin Concerto No 1 - Lalo - Symphonie Espagnole Enjoying the Bruch concerto on side A.

                  Yehudi Menuhin - Mendelssohn Concertos, Bruch Concerto Containing the same piece as the above.

                  Bach - The Brandenburg Concertos Determined to get into this having failed thus far. My only other copy on the world record club sounded too tinny and staid to my ears so hoping this release on Phillips by the English Chamber Orchestra is better.

                  In Quires and Places - Choir of the Priory Church I tend to play this kind of thing early in the morning perfect start to the day. Don't have the fondest memories of sitting in churches as a kid or torturous hymm practice at school so its odd I find myself in my 30's listening to quite a lot of organ based church music.

                  The London Oratory Junior Choir - Laetare Jerusalem Another release like above on Abbey records who I guess specialise in this sort of church, organ/choir music.
                  Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                  Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                  Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                  Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

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                  • #54
                    On the way back from the dentist today I noticed a box of records in a charity shop. I picked up Maurizio Pollini's Piano Music of the 20th Century 5 LP box set. It's austere, of course- it's Maurizio Pollini after all- but I like that.. Webern, Nono, Bartok, Boulez; it's all here. One of the reasons I picked it up is for Webern's Opus 27. I already have it with Pollini but the vinyl's a bit noisy. I hoped this would be better, but it's similar. I think Deutsche Grammaphon pressings are a bit hit and miss; give me Supraphon any day. It all looks mint, as these box sets usually are, so a quick rinse in the disco antistat should sort it. It was only £1.50 so I can't grumble. Just listening to Luigi Nono- if mrs SK walks in now she's going to go ape. I have to wait until there's nobody around for this sort of thing, really. Enough allowance is made already.
                    [IMG][/IMG]
                    [IMG][/IMG]

                    I also picked up, for 50p each, Two volumes of Modern Music (1890-1950) which comprise Volume X of The History of Music In Sound. They run from Debussy, through Skryabin (love that 'k') through to Rubbra and Rawsthorne. and feature some great interpreters: Lamar Crowson, Pasquier trio, Koeckert Quartet.....
                    Actually, listening to the Pollini Nono it strikes me it does sound like a trip to the dentist

                    "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Shere Khan View Post
                      I think Deutsche Grammaphon pressings are a bit hit and miss; give me Supraphon any day.
                      The UK pressed Supraphons are supposedly worse sounding (the ones with the "distributed by Paul Hamlyn" logo on the cover or inner sleeve). Got a few that don't sound great, but not heard a Czech one to compare. Have been avoiding those since I read that.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by bongolia View Post
                        The UK pressed Supraphons are supposedly worse sounding (the ones with the "distributed by Paul Hamlyn" logo on the cover or inner sleeve). Got a few that don't sound great, but not heard a Czech one to compare. Have been avoiding those since I read that.
                        Not something I've noticed, but a quick flick through the shelves didn't show up any Paul Hamlyns- didn't even know they did that. Mind you, I'm not coming at this from a hi-fi buff perspective because that's the last thing I am. I'm just saying that in this house DG pressings seem to be a bit crackly and when I find a Supraphon I always think 'Great, that'll be clean'. The vinyl is generally fairly thick, too. Only problem is they don't always have a legible spine- like many 'foreign' sleeves- so if they're not in alphabetical order you're buggered. It's maybe that the majority of DG pressings I come across are newer and therefore not the same quality as the older pressings because now I think of it the old DG plain white and yellow sleeves are usually okay.
                        "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Shere Khan View Post
                          Just listening to Luigi Nono- if mrs SK walks in now she's going to go ape. I have to wait until there's nobody around for this sort of thing, really. Enough allowance is made already.
                          So, Nono is a no-no. Nice piece though, sounds more like a thunderstorm approaching and departing to me.

                          Looks like a great box set.

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by amidar View Post
                            Bach - The Brandenburg Concertos Determined to get into this having failed thus far. My only other copy on the world record club sounded too tinny and staid to my ears so hoping this release on Phillips by the English Chamber Orchestra is better.
                            If it doesn't work for you perhaps seek the Richter.

                            If you've got Spotify? It's on there.

                            The modern recordings by Fasolis, Savall and Alessandrini are also there, if you'd care to compare the older and newer styles?

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Sonovox View Post
                              So, Nono is a no-no. Nice piece though, sounds more like a thunderstorm approaching and departing to me.

                              Looks like a great box set.
                              Yes, it is nice. It was written for Pollini as a dirge. Looking for what Nono himself had to say about it I came across this beautifully expressed description of the piece.

                              “Sounds of different bells reach my home in the Guidecca in Venice, Venice, variously repeating, with various meanings, during the day and the night, through the fog and the sun. They are signals of life on the Laguna, on the sea. ….and life continues in the suffered and serene necessity of the ‘equilibrium of the profound interior’ as Kafka said.”……. “The formation of sound was explored including the use of the vibrations of pedal strokes, perhaps particular resonances in the ‘profound interior’. Not episodes that distinguish themselves in their succession, but memories and presences superimposing on each other ….merging with the ‘serene waves’ (onde serene)”
                              "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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                              • #60
                                I have a lorra lorra stuff I could talk about here. But the one thing that really delivered the jawdropping for me recently was this:



                                Hindemith String Quartet No 3 / Honegger String Quartet No 2 by the Prague City & Dvorak Quartet. I really only bought it to check out the Honegger - a composer who I've heard practically nothing by. But unexpectedly, the Hindemith quartet knocked me for six. Total throat grabber, a wild and furious ride, instant hard filed. (It's Op 22, by the way, later confusingly renumbered to No 4).

                                Anyway, this was unexpected, because everything else I've heard by Hindemith seemed a bit 'meh' - Symphonic Metamorphoses, Mathis Der Maler... nothing really worked for me. This is the other end of the spectrum. So what am I missing - what else Hindemithian should I be on the lookout for?

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