Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Classical Music Finds

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Originally posted by medlar View Post
    You, and the entire rest of the world!
    "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

    Comment


    • #77
      No classical records of late just a CD of Japanese lute playing mostly by Bach which is about the only thing not written in Japanese script on the CD. Other than that I cant find much info about the album or the artist. Superb playing though and a stunning recording:

      Masatsugu Sasaki - Barock Lauten Konzert

      Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

      Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

      Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

      Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by Shere Khan View Post
        love that 'k'
        Oh dear Shere Khan - caught you at it again...we said you had to go to rehab, but you said 'Nono, Nono, Nono'...

        A quick catch-up on my classical studies - the need to acquire and install a new turntable has been a bit of a distraction recently (not to mention a huge workload) but I've remained on the lookout for interesting classical items to broaden my experience - so let's revisit some things I've learned through this thread since it began....

        I like baroque harpsichord music (and Naxos CDs)....

        Anyone who loves 'that 'k'' as much as Shere Khan could do worse than follow Xann's advice about investigating Domenico Scarlatti - he's got loads of 'em;...K 159, K 124, K 215, etc, etc... I bought this to discover more....



        Scarlatti: 'Harpsichord Sonatas' - Anthony Newman (Sony Essential Classics) - my harpsichord experience so far had all been French composers, so it was interesting to see what others had come up with. While there's nothing I find objectionable about this music, I find it less accessible than the French stuff - you can hear an immediate difference in that Scarlatti doesn't develop musical themes in the same way as the French composers - while the musical ornamentation is very much 'in yer face', the underlying melody is less obvious and so the pieces are not so instantly memorable. Scarlatti seemed to take a lot of different melodies and incorporate them in a similar style and tempo within the same piece as opposed to having the one theme developed in different ways. Thus, while the D'Anglebert 'Pancrace Royer' by Skip Sempe that Xann posted earlier in the thread is as frenetic and ornamental as any of these Scarlatti Sonatas, the listener comes away with a 'hummable tune' if you like, whereas the Scarlatti seems more fleeting to me, as if it only exists during the moment you're listening and is then forgotten.

        I imagine there are many good reasons for this of course, particularities of the local musical tradition or perhaps differences in the actual instruments and what they were capable of and not least, the preference of a composer's musical patron...there's a lot to learn isn't there? As something of an antidote, I was moved to purchase this...



        Rameau: Harpsichord Music (Complete) Volume 2 - 'Pieces de Clavecin (1728 & 1741) - Gilbert Rowland (Naxos) - Ah, that's better...back to the more familiar Allemandes and Courantes - but hey, what's this? As opposed to the 1724 (revised 1731) versions these pieces are played at a much more laid back tempo - were classical composers the first 'remixers' of their own works? Someone will have to explain this to me....whatever, these recordings are very warm and melodic and allow closer inspection of the constituent parts of the music and very wonderful they are too...with music as lovely as this it's good to take it a little slower...will now have to seek out Volume 1! (PS - props to Rameau for including 'La Poule' - chickens were important to music well before the Sun label came along, y'know...)




        We all love Pollini (but not necessarily Deutsche Grammophon...)

        Vinyl purists will be relieved to hear I've kept the classical vinyl drip-feeding in during the last few weeks despite all the distractions, and although it's tempting to go mad at charity shop prices, I'm trying to keep it at a level where I can absorb it at a fairly organic rate; even so, the acquisition rate is still probably in the lower end of 'too much, too soon'...heigh-ho...



        Chopin: Etudes Op.10 & Op.25 - Maurizio Pollini (DG)
        Brahms: Piano Concerto No.2 - Maurizio Pollini & Vienna Philharmonic (Claudio Abbado) (DG)


        Having previously bought a duff copy of Pollini's Chopin Preludes, I checked condition carefully! Of these, I've only listened to the Chopin and have to admit it's excellent - the virtuosity of Pollini's playing is truly amazing - I complained in a previous post that I found the teenage Beethoven's Piano Quartets too 'scholarly' - the sound of someone trying to fit in amongst the established order without offending his contemporaries. Thankfully, Chopin suffered no such bashfulness and set the 'show-off' bar extremely high here, demanding a level of proficiency that I suspect few could ever really meet. Again, one or two familiar melodies are reworked...also no real issues with the record itself.

        Reading recent posts, it seems one or two have an issue with Brahms. I've owned the CfP Halle recording of his Third Symphony for quite awhile (bought to check out the roots of Gainsbourg & Birkin's 'Babe Alone In Babylone'!) and it does get an occasional airing here, so I'm looking forward to giving Pollini plays Brahms a listen...

        Ravel:Bolero/Moussorgsky-Ravel: Pictures At An Exhibition - Berlin Philharmonic/Von Karajan (DG)
        Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture/Slave March/Romeo & Juliet - Berlin Philharmonic/Von Karajan (DG)


        As yet unlistened to and only a pound apiece - memories of my mum blasting out the CfP 'Bolero' on the old Fidelity stereo even before Bo Derek or Torvill and Dean, so I'm OK with that - was never much of an ELP fan, so 'Pictures' can be approached with an unpolluted ear and it's a lovely sleeve too...have vague memories of the 1812 being around the house too, but I'm not sure when I'll be in the mood to give it a listen - deep midwinter I should think...

        I like the Turnabout label/Brendel gives good Beethoven....

        Until this thread I'd either been blind or oblivious to the existence of Vox's budget wing but since the joy of finding Sophie Kind's 'Tone Paintings For Harpsichord' I've started to notice them more often; here's a couple more I nabbed:



        Gabriel Faure: Complete Piano Music Vol 2 - Evelyne Crochet (Turnabout) - one of four volumes apparently, this one including all the 'Valse-Caprices' and 'Piece-Breves, Op.84' amongst others - have been enjoying this; not the best quality recordings (done between the mid 60's and Mid 70's) and still to be tested on the new turntable, but acceptable to my ears...nice sleeve by the fellow responsible for the Stones' 'Rolled Gold', I'm assured....

        John Dunstable & Contemporaries: Music Of The Early Renaissance - Purcell Consort Voices/Musica Reservata (Turnabout) - My first chunky sleeved US Turnabout - not sure how I'll get on with this; based on past experience with early music could go either way, I tend to dislike anything that's too choir heavy...



        Beethoven: Piano Music Vol 1 - Alfred Brendel (Turnabout)
        Beethoven: Piano Music Vol 3 - Alfred Brendel (Turnabout)
        Beethoven: Variations & Vignettes - Alfred Brendel (Turnabout)


        It definitely felt like a breakthrough moment in my search for a way in to Beethoven when I discovered Brendel's 'Waldheim' on Youtube (which has been revisited many times since - must get round to buying it!) and while I've rejected one or two other Brendel recordings on grounds of condition since, this little tryptych on Turnabout was too much to resist at 50p a slice - haven't played them yet, but all seem to continue the 'remix' theme of this post, being heavily laden with variations, both on original themes and those of others (Salieri, Paisiello, Dittersdorf, etc). The 'Variations & Vignettes' album looks particularly interesting featuring jams on 'God Save The King', 'Rule Britannia' and Scottish themes - like one of those interesting little side projects made by more contemporary artists - should be fun....

        Little 'Uns

        Still no opinions on the smaller variety of classical records expressed on this thread....let's hear some....

        In the light classical dept, I revisited the Czech version of the Swingles just in time for their Xmas offering....and found three Chopin Nocturnes by a recently departed and much respected British practitioner...

        ...and finally...

        Giantchicken's outrageous bargain of the month!....

        The same charity shop that charged me 50p each for the Brendel Beethoven's decided enough was enough and they would brook no more rampant exploitation - although their maths went somewhat awry when they insisted on a whole pound for this four album box set;



        Feel a bit guilty now....I'm not sure I even like opera....
        you can hear colours when they rhyme...

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by amidar View Post
          Wow - New on me - Is there a year on there?

          Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
          Scarlatti: 'Harpsichord Sonatas' - Anthony Newman (Sony Essential Classics)... whereas the Scarlatti seems more fleeting to me, as if it only exists during the moment you're listening and is then forgotten.

          I imagine there are many good reasons for this of course, particularities of the local musical tradition or perhaps differences in the actual instruments and what they were capable of and not least, the preference of a composer's musical patron...there's a lot to learn isn't there?...
          Interpretation is everything with this stuff - That Skip Sempe is wild, no one else quite plays it like that. Scott Ross recorded the complete Scarlatti keyboard works. When I listen to that, I feel the same way you do about the Newman. Initially It's pleasant enough, but a bit forgettable. By disc 5 you're thoroughly bored - There's 30+ discs in the collection.

          Since the CD gloves are off, the most enjoyable Scarlatti I've heard are the Hantai recordings on Mirare.

          Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
          Giantchicken's outrageous bargain of the month!....

          The same charity shop that charged me 50p each for the Brendel Beethoven's decided enough was enough and they would brook no more rampant exploitation - although their maths went somewhat awry when they insisted on a whole pound for this four album box set;



          Feel a bit guilty now....I'm not sure I even like opera....
          Know what you mean.



          I don't listen to it either

          On the subject of remixes (Variations/Transcriptions) one to get lost in is 'La Folia', which started as a structure then acquired a melody line. There's loads of 'em.

          Come into some classical vinyl recently. Not entirely sure what I'm going to do with it.



          Pretty things in there too...



          What to do?

          Comment


          • #80
            The wind quintet and Jon Lord album look interesting, don't think I've ever heard 'Gemini Suite'.

            Re the Lute album: Its on CBS/Sony from 1989 Cat: CSCR 8019

            Apart from some Japanese shops selling it I cant find any other info about the album or indeed the artist.
            Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

            Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

            Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

            Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by giantchicken View Post
              Oh dear Shere Khan - caught you at it again...we said you had to go to rehab, but you said 'Nono, Nono, Nono'...

              ..
              Yes. I've been laying off since. I did just buy this but it's a CD. I'd been waiting for a cheapish copy to come up and it did so I had to. I can recommend Cuckson- she has a new CD out 'Melting The Darkness'.

              [IMG][/IMG]

              Nice bunch of Turnabouts there. I was watching Alfred Brendel on TV many years ago. My stepfather walked into the room and said, "Who's that"? I said "It's Alfred Brendel". He then said "He looks like Roy Hudd gone wrong". He wasn't far off.
              "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

              Comment


              • #82
                So, it was this thread with its harpsichord love that prompted me to pick up this Rosalyn Tureck LP:



                Outstanding! I have always found Bach keyboard works a bit stuffy, rigid, but Tureck does an amazing job of breathing life into the Chromatic Fantasia and Fugue and indeed all of the pieces here. I had never heard of her before, but will grab anything else I see immediately.

                I had a good weekend on classical keyboard front, as I also found these 10" records of Wilhelm Backhaus playing Beethoven Sonatas which are spellbinding. I am amazed at the brilliant classical vinyl there still is out there to be had for a pittance. Happy days.

                Comment


                • #83
                  talking of pittance, just bought 2 David Munrows (Greensleeves To A Ground and Music For Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain), the Turnabout Baroque Harp LP, a Supraphon Musica Antiqua Bohemica series LP (not played yet, but they have great packaging - gatefold cloth covered board, booklet, etc) and the 3 LP Archiv Production Monteverdi Vespers (Schneidt / Regensburger Domspatzen) box set (including booklet and paper sleeve) all for a fiver from the Classical Exchange in Notting Hill.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Another Turnabout harpsichord winner!....Warrington Art & Design College library's loss is my gain!..lovin' that colourscheme.....yaaaaay!!!!

                    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Woke up at an ungodly hour this morning so took a trip into town to pass the time and found a new box of vinyl in one of the chazzas at a quid a pop. A few bits for the general finds thread but a huge pile of classical and all pretty old, I'll be back early next week to have a proper look but picked these up in the meantime:



                      http://www.discogs.com/Various-Music...elease/2886162



                      http://www.discogs.com/Villa-Lobos-E...elease/5380079

                      and this very nice 3 album David Munrow boxset:



                      http://www.discogs.com/David-Munrow-...elease/2145393

                      There was a Lionel Rogg harpsichord album on Oryx that caught my eye and a Bach organ box set but I'd spent my tenner, hopefully they hang around.
                      Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                      Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                      Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                      Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        So went back for those albums and it turns out there were 2 harpsichord albums by Mr Rogg and the Bach box set was by him as well:

                        [IMG][/IMG]
                        Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                        Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                        Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                        Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          A while back I made a vague reference to picking up some records and not having digested them. They belong in this thread.

                          I’ll start with the one that has made the least impression.

                          Malta: The Music of Charles Camilleri. The New London Orchestra conducted by Joseph Sammut and Michael Moores. On the "Enterprise" label.

                          The sleeve tells me that Camilleri’s music makes much use of Maltese folk melodies. Draws a parallel with Bartok. But I thought that I could hear folk in the little Bartok that I have heard. Whereas this just sounds like garden variety light orchestral music. Apparently some of it premiered before a royal personage in 1969. I can imagine H.R.H. tapping the royal foot and thinking about regency architecture.

                          I had two reasons for investing a dollar in this. First, one of the tracks is called “Three African Dances”. I had hoped that this would get a bit fired up. Not a bit of it. There were drums in the distance at one point. The odd brief nod at a dance rhythm. All way too polite. Second was the cover. Done by the guy who did X number of Maltese national postage stamps. Google “Emvin Cremona” and you won’t find the LP sleeve.

                          Having written this I googled Camilleri and his work. I feel partly vindicated – ‘light music of the highest order’ apparently.

                          Next!

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Currently reading Norman Lebrecht's "Maestros, Masterpieces and Madness - The Secret Life and Shameful Death of the Classical Record Industry" and it's very enjoyable and full of opinionated writing, and behind-the-scenes anecdotes and info about how record companies worked. Some shockingly low (and high) sales figures, crazy contracts, just got up to the CD era, including the desperate attempts of the majors to buy Naxos, including people flying to Hong Kong with suitcases of cash (and Naxos' own classic slightly dodgy budget label behaviour). Really useful also to see how the labels and sublabels fitted together and how they positioned themselves in the market. There's quite a few WTF moments in the writing though, but it's a fun read.

                            The hardback has a nicer but blander cover than the slightly lurid paperback.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              I found Genesis of a Music by Harry Partch recently

                              http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8...sis_of_a_Music

                              Fairly inpenetrable
                              some times play g+ with back noise,some times vg , super psyché juju lpfront sleeve is very nice vg back vg , but the top corne left is eating buy rats, ask for picture

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by medlar View Post
                                I found Genesis of a Music by Harry Partch recently

                                http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8...sis_of_a_Music

                                Fairly inpenetrable
                                Well, if you're looking to move it on...

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X