Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Classical Music Finds

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Blimey O'Riley, I'd be gutted if I'd knowingly flicked past that!

    Continuing my medieval theme found these 2 on me travels:

    http://www.discogs.com/Ruthin-Castle...elease/3788739 EDIT: This has some interesting bits of spoken word and instrumental passages in amongst the horrible singing.

    http://www.discogs.com/Ladies-Of-The...elease/5455677 EDIT: This is amateur operatic gubbins, unbearable.

    Will post my thoughts if they are any good but I'm thinking they will be vocal heavy which will be a turn off. Second one looks like a bunch of medieval reenactors which brings me to a question although this could be from my warped imagination but has bugged me for years. Is there a film with Brian Glover involving Medieval reenactors in which Brian Glover semi catchphrase throughout the movie is shouting 'Faggots!' a lot?

    Originally posted by medlar View Post
    Found a copy of SXL 6426 over the weekend, it's the second press so you can all calm down - here's the first press

    http://www.popsike.com/SXL-6426-Schu...199985730.html



    Also found a copy of Hans Erik Philip's "Fiskerne (Suite For Viola And Orchestra)" - incidental music to a Danish tv programme about fishermen in 1920s Denmark so I have discovered - really enjoying this, very moody neo-classical stylee
    Last edited by amidar; 06-09-2015, 10:36 PM.
    Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

    Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

    Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

    Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

    Comment


    • It's still raining classical here, it's so easy to go to a boot sale or a charity shop and come back with an armful of punts. Just like the golden age...

      A portion of last week's booter haul:

      Comment


      • Furtwangler is well known by Beethoven buffs and fans of German Opera.

        He was principal of the Berlin Philharmonic before Herbert von, many think Karajan never reached the heights of his predecessor.

        Karajan did enjoy vast improvement in recording fidelity, that's the trade off.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Sonovox View Post



          This is more like what I am looking for, the solo violin part has the same wild and stormy nature as SQ, op22. The orchestral writing itself again seems muted in comparison.
          Blimey, fella - I hope you're looking after it....
          you can hear colours when they rhyme...

          Comment


          • My copy is sadly not a WBG, a later press and so orders of magnitude less valuable.

            Dang.

            Comment


            • *RETURNS FROM ONLINE RESEARCH*

              Ah. OK, I think I get it now....well...look after it anyway....
              you can hear colours when they rhyme...

              Comment


              • Found this lurking amongst a Jim Reeves heavy pile of vinyl in the local pound chazza. Quite avant garde on first impressions:

                [IMG][/IMG]
                Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                Comment


                • Recent classical finds, some only from today so not had the chance to listen but well chuffed with the Stockhausen as I've been outbid on that on ebay numerous times so nice to find it Mint for a quid along with the other 2 Open University albums in the set. I found it in a charity shop in my home town which I only ever check when I have to visit the dentist so root filling part 1 paid off this time, oh and more David Munrow which is always cool. I've not listened to the 'Viennese Dances' album yet but I think the sellers on discogs are being a bit hopeful:





                  [IMG][/IMG]
                  Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                  Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                  Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                  Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                  Comment




                  • Berg - 'Lyric Suite For String Quartet'/'String Quartet, Op.3' Another Turnabout album previously owned by Warrington College of Art - I wonder if they, like me, were drawn by the fantastical colours on the sleeves? It seemed as good a random technique as any to start to explore twentieth century classical, so I took the plunge....and found I'd chosen the deep end....

                    The 'Lyric Suite', first performed (and critically well received) in 1927, strikes me as a piece of music that attempts to define itself entirely by what it is not, rather than what it is. It apparently utilises the 'dodecaphonic' twelve-tone technique previously employed by Berg's tutor, friend and svengali, Schoenberg. It's a frustrating piece, which runs through a series of variations all similarly dissonant and constantly fidgets lest anyone might accuse it of having a recognisable formal structure.

                    It tunelessly meanders through the best part of half an hour in a completely non-committal way, unapologetically disappearing out of the concert hall at any time it fancies as if to make a sandwich in the kitchen or to go outside and smoke a cigarette. I tried to imagine a situation that this music might conceivably soundtrack and could only recall times when I suffered with migraine that was so bad I just wandered desperately from room to room, in the vain hope that the next doorway I stumbled through might miraculously contain a cure.

                    Perhaps I was being a little unfair and had not fully considered the context of the work. The Great War (in which Berg fought), the Russian revolution (and subsequent failure of the German revolution), dadism, expressionism, surrealism, psychoanalysis; all would have loomed large in the collective European memory; maybe a listen to an earlier work, the 'String Quartet, Op.3', first performed (and not at all critically well received) in 1911 would throw things into relief?

                    Not really - this two movement piece, whilst containing perhaps a little more recognisable human warmth and a slightly more traditional structure is in every other respect as much a slave to it's form as 'The Lyric Suite' and equally dissonant. Neither piece, for me, even exploits fully the sonic possibilities of the string quartet, dominated as they are by the higher (although mercifully , just short of screechy) register. Perhaps the most significant thing to note here is the different reception the two pieces received 15 years apart.

                    Alban Berg is apparently best remembered for his opera 'Wozzeck', based on Georg Buchner's uncompleted dramatic text of the 1830s - oddly enough, this is a combination I could see working well; Berg's dissonant, unsettled and unsettling music might very effectively soundtrack the perpetual torment and serial humiliation of Buchner's timeless cannon fodder. I wouldn't be at all surprised to find that the young Bernard Herrmann was weaned on this stuff...
                    you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                    Comment


                    • Whoa GC!

                      You got it bad!

                      Comment


                      • I'd like to read your review of Webern next please.

                        Comment


                        • What?....Did I say something... interesting?...Hmm, well apparently that 'practical criticism' option I took with my drama degree wasn't entirely wasted then...I'm intrigued by that book, I must say....
                          you can hear colours when they rhyme...

                          Comment


                          • Probably doesn't need saying but I will anyway I find the vast percentage of posts and reviews on this site most interesting and the lighthearted badinage refreshing, as well as feeling intrigued and educated I do feel the occasional pang of jealousy sometimes that I cannot write such witty and concise prose that I come across on some of the posts herein. That said this thread in particular despite me being the OP is a veritable goldmine of invaluable information and vinyl porn.
                            Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                            Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                            Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                            Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                            Comment


                            • Peter Sculthorpe – Sun Music I – IV. Ex+/P (A horizontal tear right across the front of the sleeve and water damage on the back). $1.00. On Decca.

                              The last of the local component of the batch of ‘modern classical’ that I found a while back. I thought that this would be good. Someone I know knew of him and it. Web comment seems positive. It seems to fetch a fair price. No mention on Discogs, strangely.

                              I’ll try to be positive: it isn’t the kind of tutorial exercise in amusicality that I’ve not dwelt on in my previous posts. Also, after four listens I can now hear why the four pieces are grouped together.

                              Now the downside. The four pieces are grouped together because of a common approach. The sleeve notes say that “there is an emphasis upon protracted textures involving new instrumental techniques”. For which read “the composer juxtaposes spells of ‘interesting’ sound and, for the most part, leaves you to make connections between them”. The juxtaposition doesn’t come across as completely random, there is some sense of development. Still, it reminds me vaguely of those bits of film scores which are heavily tied to screen action; just as you think a piece is shaping up nicely it goes off at a tangent in response to what is on-screen.

                              Sun Music II is probably an exception in that (the sleeve tells me) it is based on Balinese Gender Wayang music. Readers who are familiar with Gender Wayang and Sculthorpe might like to confirm, or otherwise. Also, Sun Music IV has a fairly striking motif that gets deployed a few times. Apparently it is based on a “plateau-slope-plateau” formula found in Toltec architecture. Again, that is what the sleeve says. I can’t say, my knowledge of matters Toltec not being what it was.

                              If I felt more stupid than I do I’d keep the LP in the hope that repeated exposure would in some way train my brain. As it happens, I am too lazy and self-satisfied.

                              Free to a good home. Just shout me the postage. First right of refusal to contributors to this thread to date - until next Monday, say.
                              Last edited by Grim Lounge Cowboy; 07-10-2015, 01:31 PM. Reason: First right etc.

                              Comment


                              • What next? Someone prompt me. George Crumb? Seiji Ozawa? Robert Parris? Messiaen? Milhaud?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X