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I think that hip-hop saved the charts

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  • I think that hip-hop saved the charts

    Here
    In ((( VISUAL ))) Stereo

    Eclectic Mud



  • #2
    R4 Today programme played "The Message" (82?) to illustrate the '91 hip-hop revolution

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    • #3
      it feels like it's about a 2 minute re write from being a Daily Mash article

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      • #4
        "However, there was a blip - the introduction of arena rock in the 1980s meant that, for a while, music lacked diversity."

        most songs / ballads are still stealing from the structure of these songs today


        "The third, in 1991, came about when rap and hip-hop went mainstream.

        "The third revolution is the biggest," explained Dr Mauch.

        "This is so prominent in our analysis, because we looked at harmony - and rap and hip-hop don't use a lot of harmony. The emphasis is on speech sounds and rhythm.

        "This was a real revolution: suddenly it was possible that you had a pop song without harmony."

        rap / hip hop in 1991 had melody, it was all funk samples.

        this is a terrible piece of writing
        instagram.com/vinylhoard

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        • #5
          They seem to be proposing an evolutionary/selection based theory of pop music.

          So obviously hip-hop is like wings or lungs, allowing pop to adapt to new environments.

          However evolution is never regressive, but sampling in hip-hop is like taking a bit of a dinosaur - the cool bits like big teeth or the bits on the back of a stegosaurus - and putting it on a bird or a monkey.

          I don´t think they´ve really thought it through.
          Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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          • #6
            "In the early 1960s, chords called dominant sevenths, found in jazz and blues started to die out."

            Jazz Lives! Not least as samples in hip hoppery...

            Last edited by SirSlim; 06-05-2015, 01:45 PM. Reason: spelling

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            • #7
              "In the early 1960s, chords called dominant sevenths, found in jazz and blues started to die out."

              There are also some caves in France where you can see them painted on the walls
              "You don't want to kill the cash donkey"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SirSlim View Post
                "In the early 1960s, chords called dominant sevenths, found in jazz and blues started to die out."

                Jazz Lives! Not least as samples in hip hopper...

                The professor says the dominant sevenths returned in the 70s thanks to soul and funk.

                Rather like small warm blooded shrew-type mammals, which faced extinction several times during the jurassic and Cretaceous periods, but eventually became dominant after the extinction of rock dinosaurs.
                Vardy.....¡¡¡PELIGRO!!!

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