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  • SRT pressings...

    Just back from a week in the Lake District and picked up an 80s 7" purely because it was an SRT pressing and there was a miniscule chance it might have been punk or NWOBHM related. Which is unlikely, since it looked like Oxfam had put their entire stock through popsike and taken the top price and added and extra 50% for luck. £295 for a Smashing Pumpkins album, £125 for an Aphex Twin album - nah, I'll take a gamble on a crap looking 99p single which has been on the racks for the last 24 weeks, thanks...

    Anyway, what was my original point. Ah yes, what would be a typical run for an SRT 7" in the late 70s or early 80s have been? Would it have varied much from client to client, or would 300 or 500 have been a pretty standard deal? Everybody loves to claim a record was from a pressing of 99 copies, don't they... Any help appreciated.
    Club stuff: www.facebook.com/DivineGlasgow

    Mixes: https://www.mixcloud.com/andrewdivine/

    Photos: www.instagram.com/divine_glasgow/

  • #2
    some SRT press runs were 5,000.
    new SPOKE release: >>> SEE HERE <<< RKM LIBRARY BEATS

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    • #3
      When we compiled working mans soul we spoke to several people involved with srt or their associated studios (they used one studio up north and one down south.) the basic package in the 70s was a days studio time plus 200 LPs, and they could choose to pay for more if they wished. The tapes were wiped after use, used for the next band through the doors, although again the band could pay for an extra tape copy from the studio. As col said, some srt LP runs were considerably bigger than major label first pressings!

      Sorry mr d, no idea about pressing runs on srt 80s 45s, but yes, it definitely varied widely from client to client.
      http://www.blaxploitation.com
      Chops for show, groove for dough.

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      • #4
        a little info re the Grannie rarity here, though I'm sure SRT upped the minimum press requirement when Purchase Tax was abolished in the mid-70s

        http://www.discogs.com/artist/2352414-Grannie

        info on David Richardson here:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_...udio_engineer)

        I picked up an SRT 7" today - I'm describing it as fuzz guitar drum break boom bap cover version [email protected]@K

        new SPOKE release: >>> SEE HERE <<< RKM LIBRARY BEATS

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        • #5
          Colonel - what's that Highlands record under Tricia?

          Divine - need to get our meet up organised, hope you enjoyed the Lake District. Actually just back from Cumbria myself but was restricted to Center Parcs so no digging opportunities presented themselves.

          I try to keep track of all the SRT presses I come across for no apparent reason, have a list of about 1,500 now. Need to stop keeping so many lists, it's getting unhealthy!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dukowski83 View Post
            Colonel - what's that Highlands record under Tricia?
            new SPOKE release: >>> SEE HERE <<< RKM LIBRARY BEATS

            Comment


            • #7
              Cheers Colonel - I thought it looked like a C. John Taylor effort. I have his earlier single which is - well, not my favourite. I saw it described as like 'Mull of Kintyre on acid' which rather got my hopes up but alas....

              Is this one any better?

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              • #8
                Thanks for the info, gents. As I suspected, there's no real way of knowing without the group confirming... Still not had a chance to listen, but a quick google suggests my spider senses might have been in the right ball park - the record is by Nessie (most likely NOT Scottish, though...) looks like I'll need to add a scan to 45cat.
                Club stuff: www.facebook.com/DivineGlasgow

                Mixes: https://www.mixcloud.com/andrewdivine/

                Photos: www.instagram.com/divine_glasgow/

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                • #9
                  Nessie were from the Carlisle area - or so I heard from someone far more in the know about wave/powerpop records while I was researching some early SRT singles

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                  • #10
                    some of my earlier recollections were a slightly incorrect so i thought it might be useful to post the original interview notes from our chat with Keith Herd from Fairview Studios, who recorded most of SRT's Northern-based clients.

                    Keith Herd interview
                    1hr phone call
                    13th April 2006

                    Keith Herd was the engineer behind many of the SRT sessions - those recorded at his won studio, Fairview.
                    Keith started recording bands in his house, got bitten by the engineering bug and when work started to come in regularly he set up his own studio - Fairview, based near Hull.

                    SRT was set up by two business partners, one a businessman and the other an ex-pro musician, to specialise in producing 'road albums' for bands - vinyl LPs to be sold at gigs.
                    At the time it was very difficult to find places that could organise the whole production process from recording through mastering to production, so SRT very successfully filled a gap in that market. SRT mainly advertised in Stage: bands would pay SRT a sum of around 500 GBP for 2 days in the studio and manufacture of about 200 LPs, to be sold at gigs by the band.
                    Each band could pay extra for an additional day or two in the studio and additional copies of their LP. It's likely that some of the SRT releases really are rare, since the standard SRT contract only provided for manufacturing of (Keith remembers) 200 LPs.

                    Keith won the SRT contract after working with John O'Hara on an early SRT release, and worked with SRT from about 1974 through to 1982.
                    Fairview was the preferred studio for all Northern bands, while a London-area studio (possibly near Dartford?) was used for recording all Southern-based bands.
                    At its peak, the SRT contract saw 2-3 bands per week using Fairview. It was one of Keith's biggest contracts and provided very regular work.
                    Keith learned his trade on the job - he started out with a very time-consuming instrument-by-instrument technique then learned a faster, bigger-sounding ensemble way of mixing through John O'Hara. Keith says that, in his opinion, his early SRT LPs aren't too well engineered but Keith quickly picked up studio tricks to improve the engineering and recording process so by 1975-76 Keith was on top of his game.

                    The contract specified that Keith send each band their own 1/4" master, which either ended up with the band (to use at their own replication house) or at SRT for manufacture of the LP.
                    SRT didn't necessarily return the tapes to the band or Fairview - they were often reused though so could be returned to the recording studios.
                    Keith has no copies of the tapes as standard because tape was expensive and would be reused wherever possible.

                    Apparently SRT were still going certainly until around 2004-5, so may still be going [note: this was in 2006].
                    They moved into CD production a while ago and were providing duplication services.

                    Apparently most of what Fairview did was jazz (albeit much of it fairly low-grade trad) and pop and rock, but there's also some good soul and folk on the SRT recordings from Fairview.
                    It was all recorded on then industry-standard Ampex tape, which is the sticky stuff, so any remaining tapes would need to be baked/restored before playing.
                    http://www.blaxploitation.com
                    Chops for show, groove for dough.

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                    • #11
                      SRT advertised in The Stage because it was one of the main directories for jobbing bands, singers and entertainers. Their late 70s advert reads: "SRT: a great record and sleeve manufacturing service. Phone SRT 01-446 3218."

                      Many of SRT's clients advertised in The Stage too and mentioned their SRT LPs!
                      http://www.blaxploitation.com
                      Chops for show, groove for dough.

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