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  • Traps...

    "What kind compromises have you made that those collectors’ haven’t had to?
    Well, I’ve never been able to keep hold of any of my more valuable stuff for a start. I’ve had original Beatles’ demos, Sex Pistols acetates and other things worth thousands, but as I’ve always had to concentrate on fast turnover, so they’ve had to be sold. I had six children so I haven’t had choices since about 1981, but it’s stopped me from falling into the same traps of loneliness, addiction and seeing my collection as a measure of my social standing on planet earth, which other collectors do."

    This was taken from a blog flagged up by BradX in his thread "Someone should tell Brian..." Link: http://www.verygoodplus.co.uk/showth...uld-tell-Brian

    It's a decent read on hoarding / collecting records and how it has influenced those people's lives. It's the last sentence that interests me here... It comes from "Paul" an experienced record dealer.

    I'm not sure board members would want to go public on their feelings or experiences here, but I'll ask anyway.

    Have any of you or do any of you know anyone who has fallen into the traps Paul mentions - loneliness, addiction and seeing my collection as a measure of my social standing on planet earth?

    and is he right anyway? Discuss...
    In ((( VISUAL ))) Stereo

    Eclectic Mud



  • #2
    I have an addictive personality I've proved that on many an occasion collecting music is a safe form of it unless it becomes hoarding then it can affect yours and other lives in a negative way. I don't have any really expensive records but if I had anything worth around the 500 quid mark I'd have no problem selling it. OG, Third Press, Reissue I don't mind as long as it sounds good.

    I like the ritual of vinyl, reading the sleeve notes, putting the record on all that stuff. I have tons of digital files and its not the same, no buzz or effort. Youngsters today consume music in a different way through itunes etc so I hope the vinyl revival continues how it is but I agree with him its wont become massive but it shows there is still the 'teenage me' out there who loves music and wants to find out about it rather than just have a random collection of songs on an ipod so I hope at least a little trickles back into the high street and the stores keep going.

    I love music the collecting side comes second to that I would say but there is nothing wrong with either, I guess I enjoy both.

    I'm pretty strict on myself if I'm keeping something its usually 1 in 1 out these days, As for a measure of my social standing I have no friends who share many of my musical interests some cross over others don't so that doesn't bother me and never has.

    I hate talking about music to other random collectors I meet on my travels because they usually want to talk about presses and the cost of things or quite obviously know little above the rock standards and that probably makes me sound like a prick but I'd rather talk about the weather or something else (I generally don't bump into serious collectors on my travels). I like Led Zeppelin but I've heard them a million times and don't care about the first press of '1' unless I find one then and sell it which wont happen. Sometimes recently I've felt like I've been unconsciously grilled by sellers with little knowledge about what is worth money, I hate that.

    I like what John Peel said something along the lines of 'I want to listen to something I haven't heard everyday' and I like finding the odd good tune on records others wouldn't buy. That's one of the reasons I enjoy this forum among other reasons.

    I've felt lonely at times, guess many people have and music has kept me company one of its many magical gifts.
    Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

    Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

    Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

    Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

    Comment


    • #3
      I have a hoarding tendency. but I also like to sell, so im always fighting myself.
      I like to own 1 of everything in the series, even if I have made the series up in my head. but then once I won them all, im not fussed about selling them off. in fact what I do sometimes to break the "must collect them all" in me, is to sell one of the rearest bits. then I don't own them all, so I can sell the others.
      weird really.
      im not bothered about owning really rare records, I get scared with anything worth over £100. id rather someone else had it in case I drop it, scratch it or bend the sleeve. I like to own every song I like on vinyl. but recently have even stopped this. I mainly like vinyl for the size and covers, which is why I haven't got caught up in the recent soundtrack re issue wave. id rather have the original cover, showing the film, than a painting of something.

      People are strange really.

      I find it hard to talk to record shop owners, or stalls as I don't really care about rarity, or what its worth. its also hard as ill look though lots of different sections. so when they ask "what are you looking for?" I don't have an answer. im looking for something different, something that I want to buy.
      instagram.com/vinylhoard

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm Skip and I'm a vinylholic

        I've analysed my collecting regularly over the years and in the past five years really started to question it, especially since these days if I want to listen to a record it's usually easier to google it and stream it than to find it within the mess of vinyl.

        I started a collection by accident as I guess most people do. It started innocently with a few MoWax 12s and then before long I was avoiding lectures in Manchester by hiding in the bargain crates downstairs at vinyl exchange. A few cases of "oh you collect records? Here's a suitcase full" and soon I had a collection. Exposure to the easy listening scene at nights like Fondue (I think it was called) and the diverse tunes played at nights like DiscoPogo and I was rooting around in charity shops for [hammond] gold. My graduate loan went on a pair of 1210s so I could call myself a DJ despite only playing to an empty bar every third Tuesday.

        Since those days I've had phases where I've bought heavily into new music and haven't entered a charity shop, and other spells where I've been digging through copies of The Sound Of Music and No Parlez almost daily. I've never been tempted by the realms of rare Polish psych-jazz and prefer the serendipity of Sue Ryder.

        It's only recently that I've started to really question why I collect or what the value is in having a collection that I don't tend to listen to much and even if I did I'd need a few lifetimes of listening to get through. As I say when I first started collecting in the nineties even if you wanted to hear something common the only way was to own it or hope it came on the radio, now music is freely available everywhere. My vinyl takes up a lot of space and when I'm feeling weighed down mentally by stress it takes on the manner of a physical representation of that burden. Sometimes I wonder how light I'd feel if I just gave it all away. I look at dance 12"s I paid a tenner for that now go for 20p on discogs and wonder about all the money I could have saved.

        All in all, the pleasure I get from finding records nestling in odd places with 50p stickers on greatly outweighs the pleasure I get from actually owning a collection. It's the digging that gives me the buzz.

        Part of the problem is my life has changed from the years of "all back to mine" and playing tunes while friends sat around getting high. I'm a family man now and my chums are family folks too. It's all dinner parties and home by 9. Well it can feel like that anyway.

        The reason I started engaging here after decades of lurking was to try and reconnect with the feeling of sharing a great hidden break unearthed at a boot sale. I think it's probably too late to stop collecting - I think the only way to do it would be to ditch the whole lot. So I'm using you lot as a support group instead. Somewhere to come for conversations that aren't about schools and mortgages, and somewhere to show off what I found in Salvation Army to people that really care :-)

        Comment


        • #5
          A few years ago I felt that I was getting too obsessed with buying records

          Every journey I made had to factor in a 'quick' trip to a charity shop. Every holiday involved finding out about the nearest record shop. I was spending hours trawling the internet to try and find on line stores that had bargains
          The time I was putting into looking for records was starting to push aside the time for other things.

          And that was before the problem of when would I listen to them - how much time can you devote to one album if you have a steadily growing in pile? I found I was picking out one track I liked, digitizing it so I could listen to it on my ipod and then putting the record away.
          The acquisition of records had become more important than the music
          I'm not a horder - I don't have piles of records around the house and although I've got a stupid amount of vinyl it doesn't take over my living space
          But I began to ask myself what was the point in holding on to the records if the thrill was really in getting them and not in the music that they contained.
          I felt I wasn't taking into account all of those musicians who had written, played and recorded the music I had in my house that I just ignoring?

          So I took a year out from buying records. I didn't go into charity shops, record shops or buy on line. Instead I went back to the records I already owned and made a conscious effort to engage in greater depth with them.
          I discovered that records I had owned for a long time - in particular ones that I had come to know as a teenager or in my early 20s - felt like old friends. I knew all of the tracks, all of the twists and turns of the music, the nuances of lyrics. And of course they triggered many happy memories.
          When thinking about the records I liked most, that meant most to me, that had a great effect on my life, I returned again and again to those that I knew best. The 'trophy' records, or the ones that I'd bought because they were 'cool' or I thought would be cool, had only a minimal impact on me

          So I went through the shelves and got rid of a lot of dead weight.

          And when the year was done I had accrued a lot of store credit which I then spent of more records!!!!

          But, if there is a lesson, its made me think about my record purchases in a much more focused way. Do I really want this or am I just buying it because I'm in a record shop? Do I really want to spend so much money on a record which only one good song?

          I can't see a point when I will not want to discover new music (or music that is new to me!) on vinyl. But its something that has to co-exist with the other parts of my life - not the other way around
          "Record collecting is no mere hobby, no innocuous leisurely diversion. It is a feverish passion bordering on dementia, driving those under the influence to irrational, compulsive, fanatical extremes."

          Night of the Living Vinyl

          Comment


          • #6
            Some very interesting responses here and I certainly recognise myself in a lot of the comments ....

            .... but going directly to the question "What kind compromises have you made that those collectors’ haven’t had to?" I think I realised sometime quite early in my teens that I was never going to get a good job, have a career, get married and have children. Probably a terrible combination of lack of ambition, no direction, laziness and lack of confidence.
            The only thing I was good at was reading the NME and buying records.

            I was very lucky though - after floundering about in my late teens /early 20s I got a job in a radio station. And then later on in the 80s & 90s I got jobs in record shops. Sometimes I did both at the same time.
            I am ashamed (but not very) to admit that I have never bought any clothes for myself. I hate clothes shops and have panic attacks.... so I either get given clothes or I get someone to buy them for me. I have never owned a car and I rarely go on holiday. I've never had a mortage.
            There's a ton of things I went without ... not solely so I could buy more records.... but that was a part of it. Some things I'm just not very interested in (clothes, cars, even food was tedious for a long time).

            That all kind of worked ok for 30 years but I quit my job recently and moved away from where I used to live. I've lost my way a bit with my records. I still have a lot... and down the years I've sold a lot (estimated over 10,000) .... but now I like my CDs. I know, I know.... but I like hunting cheap Cds, it's still possible. I never (or very rarely) see any records I want.
            Recently I've had more time on my hands and it's been good going through my Cd collection - which is about 10,000 strong. I've found a ton of stuff I didn't know I had. Lots of promo things and obscurities.
            My records.... they are preserved, a bit like a mosquito in amber. I love them and everything but I'm just not bothered about listening to them anymore. I consider them a weighty liability (like Skip said upthread).
            The way record collecting has gone is a turn-off for me. I liked the old days when you could find weird stuff for pennies.
            If I could sell my record collection in one hit for a good price I probably would. My old pal /boss from the record shop offered me £20,000 for the lot which was almost tempting.
            galaxy of fallon to telepath 1

            Comment


            • #7
              RE: I just wanted to add a thought on this quote: "seeing my collection as a measure of my social standing on planet earth"

              I do wonder about my collection and about stuff I own or even just consume in general the extent that it is truly me and the extent that it is the person who I want to show to the world and the extent it is a me that I aspire to. I mentioned above that I used to enjoy being seen as a digger and a dj and maybe that fed into my collecting habit. Maybe I wanted to self identify with DJ Shadow and Peanut Butter Wolf. Now I work in an office job and live in a house with my wife and kids I rarely encounter anyone who even knows who or what a Peanut Butter Wolf is and I find myself wondering who I do self identify with.

              It's something I muse on often - if I grew a beard and got a big tattoo and a fixie it'd be because I wanted to self identify with a certain social group. A lot of moneyed folk seem to buy big black range rovers - why do they all want the same car? If I purchase a James Last LP is it because I want to own it or because I want to share it here on the finds thread?

              Do I actually like this Philip Glass opera or that Fugazi LP or do I just want to present an image of myself to the world of someone who enjoys the operas of Philip Glass and the music of Fugazi whilst actually listening to Fleetwood Mac's Rumours on repeat whenever I'm alone.

              If you see a purchase as an investment in yourself (not that this makes economic sense but go with me), are you investing in (1) your current self; (2) a self that you want to portray to others or (3) an idealised future self? Necessities such as basic food fall into the current self category but beyond that everything falls into the future self or externally presented self categories. This makes every purchase an element in the design of you. When you think about it in those terms you'd never buy a James Last LP again. But I don't think in those terms when I'm stood in record shops only when I get home and I'm trying to sneak vinyl past the wife as she talks about how the kids need shoes.

              This is a very cathartic thread.

              Comment


              • #8
                I used to buy loads of records for breaks, so I could play people amazing things from records when they visited me.
                no one visits me that's interested in breaks. no one visits me that is interested in the same music as me. so why do I still have the records. im not going to sample them.
                instagram.com/vinylhoard

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had to google 'fixie' man I'm getting old we call them 'push rods' down our way.

                  Is that a thing hipsters riding no geared bikes around town?
                  Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                  Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                  Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                  Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It was five years ago when I worked in Clerkenwell. I'm out in the sticks now so I don't see so many proper hipsters although the image has pervaded the mainstream. I imagine the genuine hipster is onto something even more esoteric by now.

                    I have looked sneeringly at hipsters whilst simultaneously wondering whether, had I been born in 1996 instead of 1976, I would be one.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't drink really, don't smoke, don't do drugs, don't follow football, no kids, mortgage paid off. Don't really need to buy any more records at all. I could easily see the rest of my days out with what I've got already. I still enjoy finding new sounds, usually online, and tracking the little blighters down. It is a bit of a lone pursuit for me. None of my local mates are interested in music/records to the extent I am. So it's a kind of self inflicted loneliness. I want to do it. I don't really even analyse why I do it. What's the point? I'm not going to beat myself up about doing something I enjoy.
                      It is, however, great to meet up with similarly "afflicted" people from the forum, have a good old rummage around through loads of records, and generally nerdy ourselves stupid over a very trivial pursuit, which means a lot to us. It's Zen-like man
                      Everyone tear down your own little wall
                      That keeps you from being a part of it all
                      Because you've got to be one with the one and all
                      You've just got to be close to it all

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by treeboy View Post
                        It is, however, great to meet up with similarly "afflicted" people from the forum, have a good old rummage around through loads of records, and generally nerdy ourselves stupid over a very trivial pursuit, which means a lot to us. It's Zen-like man
                        All my navel gazing above comes from sharing thoughts that I've had for a long time but nobody who I could share them with who might understand. I would like to make peace with my collecting and I need to reach acceptance. Zen is the right word!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          jeez...some home truths here. i could cut and paste my record buying cv in to this thread from the bits i've already read above.

                          i'll collect my thoughts and update this post later.
                          "I don't want to live in the past but it's a nice place to visit."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Share away Skip. You've landed in the right place. You refer to your mess of vinyl and the hassles of finding a particular record when you want to listen to it. You probably don't need me to tell you, but spend some time sorting them out (you'll probably shed some too as a result) so you can access what you want when you want to. It starts getting on top of you otherwise. And then you resent them. And probably ignore them, regard them as a problem.
                            It doesn't have to be like that. Not too late to fall back in love with your vinyl
                            Everyone tear down your own little wall
                            That keeps you from being a part of it all
                            Because you've got to be one with the one and all
                            You've just got to be close to it all

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Having been born in the same year and already had my birthday I can relate to a lot of what you've said.

                              Never went to Uni though so don't think I'd have ended up in the Hipster stylee my story is more like Brad but without the shopping bit and with added computers.

                              Originally posted by Skip View Post
                              It was five years ago when I worked in Clerkenwell. I'm out in the sticks now so I don't see so many proper hipsters although the image has pervaded the mainstream. I imagine the genuine hipster is onto something even more esoteric by now.

                              I have looked sneeringly at hipsters whilst simultaneously wondering whether, had I been born in 1996 instead of 1976, I would be one.
                              Mixes, Music: https://www.mixcloud.com/amitron_7/

                              Music: https://blackmoofou.bandcamp.com/

                              Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL1...bw92ZSjvLMZKlQ

                              Latest Infant Project: https://soundcloud.com/bcmf

                              Comment

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