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  • Poetry

    anyone fa,iliar with the bgp imprint beat goes poetry

    picked up a sleeveless album called poetry and jazz at the blackhawk a few years back and then lost it. never seen or heard anything of this imprint since so if anyone's got any info it'd be appreciated.

  • #2
    Easy, brethren.

    I know about dis.

    FERLINGHETTI: “Autobiography”, Lawrence Ferlinghetti/The Cellar Jazz Quartet, “Poetry Readings in the Cellar”, Beat Goes Poetry BGP 1024

    But that's about it.

    C ya later, fatty pum pum.

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    • #3
      cheers mucka, figured you'd know about this but i always forget to ask ya. have you got any?

      Comment


      • #4
        I think they only re-ished a couple of LPs. One was the Blackhawk and the other was a Ginsberg one (Howl and other poems).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by [b
          Quote[/b] (wrong tom @ 12 June 2003,15:23)]have you got any?
          That's a no show, doodio.

          Comment


          • #6
            Jazz at The Balckhawk by Kenneth Rexroth is a VERY RARE LP,
            for commercially released LP's anyway.

            Originally released on Fantasy in close to/around 1958/59
            on RED VINYL. 2nd pressings are rare too on Black vinyl

            These are US Pressings btw

            As far as the Beats go, Rexroth was quite a bit of a snob, college educated, money in the family and all of that there,
            he thought of Kerouac as a bum.

            Jack

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            • #7
              doesn't suprise me about our ken hating on kerouac, have you heard this record? The man's scathing wit is incredible, i particularly love 'Nicolas'.

              Shame i lost my copy even if it was a bgp version. cheers for the info - most helpful

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              • #8
                As far as Beat Poets go, Kenneth Patchen is my Beat god.

                Some guys just couldn't read like others, that's for sure.
                I'm not a Kerouac or Ferlinghetti fan for that reason alone.

                K Patchen reads with great rumbling passion and the jazz that backs him is top drawer jazz, like 1958 west coast bop.

                I am sure many of you have heard
                "The Murder of Two Men By a Young Kid Wearing Lemon Colored Gloves". That might be his best LP, called
                "Kenneth Patchen Reads his Poetry with Jazz", released in 1958

                I've got MP3's on the site. Just type Patchen into the search
                and it will bring it right up.

                JD

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                • #9
                  On the subject, the back of the BBC Radiophonic LP mentions work done by the workshop (mainly David Cain or Baker, I think) for 'experimental poetry broadcasts on Radio 3', but I've never heard/come across any of these (to my knowledge, anyway). Sounds intriguing...does anyone know if any of this stuff has been mp3'd on the web, released or whatever?
                  a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by [b
                    Quote[/b] (wayne @ 18 June 2003,00:40)]BBC Radiophonic LP mentions work done by the workshop (mainly David Cain or Baker, I think) for 'experimental poetry broadcasts on Radio 3', but I've never heard/come across any of these
                    probably done for Bob Cobbing, anna locwood, Charles Verey, Neils Mills. lookout for an LP released by the ARTS COUNCIL in 1971 called "konkret canticle - Experiments in Disintregrating language" (33AC). It's very wild, mostly in the "lettrisme" style (see Henry Chopin, bernard Hiedesieck, Lemaitre, bryon Gysin, Hausmann ect.)
                    http://www.iueke.com/

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                    • #11
                      iueke -

                      thanks for that: a quick search with the info you posted immediately hit on mp3's of the material at Ubuweb

                      http://www.ubu.com/sound/konkrete.html

                      so I'll get down to downloading & listening to those later.

                      You're a star!
                      a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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                      • #12
                        As regards the Radiophonic Workshop, I think there was an adaptation of Ray Bradbury's 'And There Will Come Soft Rains' that featured some sounds from RWS staffman Desmond Briscoe. There's also a 1960s BBC Transcription Service sampler LP which features a short clip from a play (can't remember which one) with Radiophonic backing.

                        On a similar theme, has anyone ever heard any of those 'Living Shakespeare' LPs which turn up in charity shops quite often - they've got 'Music Concrete by Desmond Briscoe' on them, and I've always wondered what they're like. Must buy one one day.

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                        • #13
                          Checking the Radiophonic LP notes in relation to the earlier post, the man in question is David Cain (not John Baker) & the specifics are that the material was made for a TV series called 'Six Bites Of The Cherry': also mentioned is a 1967 'experimental radio production of TS Eliot's The Waste Land', a poem on the mass 'set for chorus, boy's choir, solo speaker & electronic tape' & (away from poetry) sound scores for 'War Of the worlds' & 'The Hobbit' on radio...and a 'Total Radio Stereophonic Experiment' called RUS, based on a history of russian culture...it was the 'Six Bites...' I was struggling to remember earlier...

                          As for those Shakespeare sets, heard a few bits of them while using them to teach poetry a few years back, & 'musique concrete' seemed to mean 'orchestrated sound effects' rather than actual concrete compositions (if there's a difference?); battle noises, footsteps, doors creaking etc etc...but not obviously approached musically, if you know what I mean. Then again, there are so many of those recordings maybe the sets you mean are different ones...
                          a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            obviously a subject close to my own heart - can i just throw in that apart from the experimental poetry with radiophonic backing mentioned above, the workshop (delia derbyshire in this case) produced an electroacoustic / music concrete backing for a radio3 programme called "inventions for radio", where people were asked to talk about their dreams. delia subsequently took this material, chopped and processed it and added lots of radiophonics to great effect.

                            "dreams" was never actually released, but there is a 9-minute edit of it in mp3 for download at the delia derbyshire website.

                            http://www.deliaderbyshire.org/recordings.php3

                            the site is a great resource for radiophonic info, i suppose most people will know about it already but anyway, have a look round if you've not already.

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                            • #15
                              The 'dreams' edit is great: this is the sort of stuff radio ought to be doing & isn't (not on the BBC anyway). I also love the Anthony Newley 'Moogie Bloogies' track - totally insane, but impossible to resist... Love to imagine Anthony popping that one onto the turntable for Joan Collins to check out!

                              These smilies are genius, by the way: if you pair them up, do you get a 'celebrity deathmatch' scenario?



                              Guess not...
                              a giant steam-powered turntable in warwickshire plays six foot cement recordings of Prince Albert's speeches to the rejoicing populace

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